Games
[Event "Tata Steel Masters"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.01.13"] [Round "1.6"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Matlakov, Maxim"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C77"] [WhiteElo "2767"] [BlackElo "2718"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "105"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. d3 {Anand decided to avoid the main lines.} b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 7. c3 d6 8. Bg5 ({Caruana against So chose instead: } 8. Nbd2 O-O 9. Nf1 {but Black was perfectly fine after} d5 10. exd5 Nxd5 11. Ng3 f6 12. O-O Be6 {Caruana,F (2799)-So,W (2788) London 2017}) 8... h6 { Questioning the bishop at once is Black's best reaction.} 9. Bh4 g5 10. Bg3 Ba7 $146 {The black bishop is standing on the road of the rooks thus the black one on a8 ambushes its opponent.} (10... Bb6 11. Nbd2 O-O 12. Qe2 Ne7 13. d4 Ng6 14. dxe5 Nh5 15. O-O-O Nhf4 16. Bxf4 Nxf4 17. Qf1 {as in Alekseev,E (2651) -Predke,A (2543) Kaliningrad 2015}) 11. Nbd2 ({One point behind Matlakov's idea is that a move like} 11. a4 {can be simply ignored.}) 11... Na5 12. Bc2 Nh5 {Active play.} 13. a4 {This typical idea is not effective here.} (13. b4 { first, and only after} Nc6 14. a4 {was more accurate.}) 13... b4 $1 {Matlakov seizes his chances and takes over the initiative.} 14. cxb4 Nc6 15. b5 Nb4 { The knight offers Black some extra tactical options.} 16. Nc4 (16. Bb1 { disconnects the white rook from the queen and the simple} axb5 {leads to Black's advantage, since} 17. axb5 $2 (17. Qb3 {is better, although Black looks good after} Bc5) 17... Bxf2+ {is not good for White.}) ({Perhaps the simple} 16. O-O {was best when the tactical line} axb5 17. axb5 Bxf2+ $2 18. Bxf2 Rxa1 19. Qxa1 Nxc2 20. Qa4 {self-traps the knight on c2.}) 16... Nxg3 { Going for a forcing continuation.} ({Also promising for Black seems} 16... g4 17. Nh4 axb5 18. Ne3 ({Worse is} 18. axb5 Bxf2+ 19. Kxf2 Rxa1 20. Qxa1 Nxc2) 18... Bxe3 19. fxe3 Nxg3 20. hxg3 Qg5 {and Black should be somewhat better.}) 17. hxg3 g4 18. Nh4 ({No time for a spoiler} 18. b6 gxf3 19. bxa7 fxg2 20. Rg1 Nc6 $1 {favours Black.}) 18... axb5 19. axb5 (19. Ne3 Bxe3 20. fxe3 {would have transposed to the line mentioned above.}) 19... Bxf2+ {The ambush worked!} 20. Kxf2 Rxa1 21. Qxa1 Nxc2 22. Qa4 Qf6+ {It is important to spoil White's co-ordination.} ({Instead the immediate} 22... Nd4 23. b6+ Kf8 24. Rf1 { would allow artificial castling as} Qf6+ $2 25. Ke1 {is bad for Black.}) 23. Kg1 ({Or else the king would be badly exposed.} 23. Ke2 Nd4+ 24. Ke1 O-O) 23... Nd4 24. b6+ {A critical moment.} Bd7 {This natural move throws Black's advantage away.} ({Correct was} 24... Kf8 $1 {Now White cannot grab the pawn} 25. bxc7 $4 {due to the spectacular mate} ({Therefore Anand should have continued as in the game with} 25. Qd1 cxb6 26. Kh2 Kg7 27. Rf1 {but now} Qd8 { is an important additional option for Black. True, Anand's knights will have a lot of fun visiting both outposts on d5 and f5, but Black is a pawn up.}) 25... Ne2+ 26. Kh2 Qxh4+ $1 27. gxh4 g3#) 25. Qd1 $1 ({Once again} 25. bxc7 {is mate after} Ne2+ 26. Kh2 Qxh4+ 27. gxh4 g3#) 25... cxb6 26. Kh2 O-O 27. Rf1 { Now the difference with the above-mentioned line becomes clear. The bishop on d7 stands on the road of the black queen.} Qg5 ({If} 27... Qe7 28. Qd2 Kh7 29. Qb4 {regains the pawn.}) 28. Nxd6 Be6 {Now Black has to be careful.} 29. Nhf5 Nxf5 {Drops a pawn.} ({Correct was} 29... Rd8 30. Nxd4 Rxd6 31. Nxe6 Rxe6 32. Rf5 Qg7 {White is somewhat better, but Black should be able to hold.}) 30. exf5 Bd5 31. Qe2 Qf6 $1 {Practically forced.} ({Since} 31... f6 32. d4 $1 exd4 33. Qb5 Ba2 34. Rf4 $1 {leaves the black pieces scattered around the board.}) 32. Qxg4+ {Eight moves later tables have turned, and it is White who has the extra pawn.} Kh7 33. Ne4 Bxe4 34. dxe4 Rd8 {Correctly activates the rook.} (34... Rg8 35. Qf3) 35. Rc1 Rd4 36. Rc7 Rb4 37. Qe2 Kg7 38. Rc8 Qg5 ({Black has to be careful not to let the white queen in.} 38... Rd4 $2 39. Qb5 {with the threat Qb5-e8 could be deadly.}) (38... Kh7) 39. Rc6 Rb3 ({Here and on the next few moves it made sense to insert} 39... h5 $1 {fixing the white pawns.}) 40. Rc3 Rb4 ({On a hindsight, the queen endgame} 40... Rxc3 $1 41. bxc3 Qd8 {sounds like a better after-game idea...}) 41. b3 Rd4 42. Rc6 Rb4 43. Qf3 Kh7 {Now Anand finds a way to consolidate his advantage.} 44. Rd6 $1 Kg7 45. Rd5 { The rook is perfect on d5. It attacks the black pawns and limits the opponent's rook.} ({Not} 45. f6+ Kg6 46. Rd8 Qh5+ 47. Qxh5+ Kxh5 48. Rg8 Rxe4 49. Kh3 Re3 {and Black is just in time.}) 45... Qf6 {Now that the queen the passive, the king can get better.} 46. Kg1 $1 {One idea is to support the white pawns from the f3 square. Another-to go all the way to c3 and trap the black rook.} Kh7 47. Qd3 Kg7 48. Kf2 Rd4 ({Or} 48... Kh7 49. Rd6 Qg7 50. Kf3 { intending g3-g4.} (50. Ke2 Qg4+)) 49. Rxd4 exd4 50. Qb5 Qd8 ({The last chance was} 50... Qd6 51. e5 Qc7) 51. Qd5 Qf6 (51... Qxd5 52. exd5 Kf6 53. d6) 52. g4 Kg8 53. Kf3 {Black resigned as he loses a second pawn.} (53. Kf3 h5 54. e5 hxg4+ 55. Kxg4 Qg7+ 56. Kf3) 1-0 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.01.13"] [Round "1.3"] [White "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Black "Wei, Yi"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2787"] [BlackElo "2743"] [PlyCount "109"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [WhiteTeam "Russia"] [BlackTeam "China"] [WhiteTeamCountry "RUS"] [BlackTeamCountry "CHN"] 1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. d4 Nf6 5. O-O O-O 6. c4 dxc4 7. Na3 c5 8. dxc5 c3 9. Nb5 Na6 10. Nxc3 Nxc5 11. Be3 Nfe4 12. Nxe4 Nxe4 13. Bd4 Bxd4 14. Qxd4 Qxd4 15. Nxd4 Nd6 16. Rac1 Rd8 17. f4 Kf8 18. Kf2 Bg4 19. h3 Bd7 20. e4 Rac8 21. Rxc8 Rxc8 22. Rd1 Ke8 23. e5 Nf5 24. Nb3 Bc6 25. Rc1 Kd7 26. Nc5+ Ke8 27. Nd3 Kd7 28. g4 Nd4 29. Rc4 Ne6 30. f5 gxf5 31. gxf5 Ng7 32. Bxc6+ bxc6 (32... Rxc6 {Positionally this is desirable. Black certainly doesn't desire to weaken the pawns. Unfortunately for Wei Yi, Kramnik has prepared some tactics.} 33. e6+ $1 fxe6 $4 (33... Ke8 34. exf7+ Kf8 35. Rxc6 bxc6 {The knight endgame is also very difficult for Black to defend thanks to the ghastly pawn structure.}) 34. Ne5+ {is a simple fork.}) 33. Nc5+ Kc7 34. Rh4 h5 35. f6 exf6 36. exf6 Ne8 37. Rxh5 Nxf6 38. Rf5 Nd5 39. Rxf7+ Kd6 40. Ne4+ Ke5 41. Nd2 a5 42. Nc4+ Ke6 43. Rh7 Rb8 44. Ke2 Kf5 45. Rh6 Nf6 46. h4 a4 47. Kd3 c5 48. Ne3+ Ke5 49. h5 Rd8+ 50. Kc4 Ne4 (50... Rd2 $1 {The engine considers this Wei Yi's last resource.} 51. Kxc5 Ne4+ $1 52. Kc6 Kd4 {Both tho knight check and this move were necessary to permit Black to capture on b2.} 53. Nf5+ Ke5 {and the knight either repeats the position by retreating to e3 or White surrenders b2 when Black has good chances of a draw.}) 51. Kb5 Kd4 52. Nc4 a3 53. Nxa3 Nd6+ 54. Kc6 Nf7 55. Nb5+ 1-0 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.01.13"] [Round "1.2"] [White "Giri, Anish"] [Black "Hou, Yifan"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2752"] [BlackElo "2680"] [PlyCount "127"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [WhiteTeam "Netherlands"] [BlackTeam "China"] [WhiteTeamCountry "NED"] [BlackTeamCountry "CHN"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Nc3 Nxc3 6. dxc3 Be7 7. Be3 Nc6 8. Bd3 Be6 9. Qe2 Bf6 10. O-O-O Qe7 11. Kb1 a6 12. Rhe1 O-O-O 13. h3 Rhe8 14. g4 h6 15. Nd2 Bg5 16. f4 Bh4 17. Bf2 Bxf2 18. Qxf2 Qf8 19. f5 Bd7 20. f6 g6 21. Be4 Kb8 22. Nc4 Re6 23. Bxc6 Rxe1 24. Rxe1 Bxc6 25. Na5 Re8 26. Nxc6+ bxc6 27. Qg3 Qh8 28. Re7 Rxe7 29. fxe7 Qe8 30. Qe3 Kc8 31. h4 Kd7 32. Qxh6 Qxe7 { After an exchange of forcing play, the position calms. The queen endgame proves slightly more favorable for Giri primarily because of the weakness of the a-pawn which can frequently be targeted.} 33. b3 Qe4 34. g5 Qe5 35. Qf8 Qd5 36. Kb2 c5 37. Qg8 Qf3 38. Qf8 Qd5 (38... Kc6 $4 {It's important to note that this is not possible which means Black has no waiting moves with the king.} 39. Qa8+ {wins the black queen.}) (38... Qf1 $4 {Shuffling with the queen on the f-file also loses.} 39. h5 $1 gxh5 40. g6 {and White queens.}) 39. Qg7 Qf5 40. Qg8 Qf3 41. a4 Qf1 42. Qf8 Qf5 43. Qa8 Qf1 44. Qe4 {Giri has cleverly used zugzwang to obtain a magnificent central posting for his queen. Hou Yifan now has a very difficult choice.} Kd8 $2 {the classic misstep in a difficult position.} (44... Kc8 $1 {Positioning the king to defend the a-pawn if White allows it was the most resiliant idea.}) 45. Qg4 $1 {White both prepares h5 (which liquidates the weak h-pawn) and prevents the black king from traveling to b7 to defend the a-pawn and relieve the queen.} d5 46. a5 $2 (46. h5 $1 { The engine calls a5 a significant mistake and prefers to play this immediately. White can play a5 at a later time.}) 46... Qe1 47. h5 gxh5 48. Qxh5 Qe6 49. Qh8+ Ke7 50. b4 cxb4 51. cxb4 Kd7 52. Qd4 Kc8 $6 {Moving the king away is dangerous. King and pawn endgames loom, and the king needs to be near the action.} (52... Qd6 {Maintaining the status quo should be fine for Black.}) 53. Qf6 Qxf6+ 54. gxf6 Kd7 55. Kb3 Kc6 $4 {The losing mistake - this endgame is sure to appear in king and pawn manuals in future.} (55... Kd6 $1 {This move prepares c5 which will hold the balance without great difficulty.} 56. b5 { Perhaps ...Kc6?? was an attempt by Hou Yifan to stop this break?} axb5 57. Kb4 c6 $1 {This and only this draws. Ideas of a6 and Kc5 look scary, but Black keeps equality, promoting just after White.} (57... Kc6 $4 58. c3 $1 {is zugzwang. I would guess that a line like like this combined with the scary lines after ...c6 might have convinced Hou that this path was losing. She was in great time trouble at this point.}) 58. a6 Kc7 59. Kc5 b4 {...d4 is similar. } 60. Kxb4 Kb6 61. a7 Kxa7 62. Kc5 Kb7 63. Kd6 d4 64. Ke7 c5 65. Kxf7 c4 66. Kg7 d3 67. cxd3 cxd3 68. f7 d2 69. f8=Q d1=Q {Naturally such lengthy continuations would be hard for Hou to spot in time trouble after a long defense.}) 56. c4 d4 {This loses as due to mutual zugzwang as Black can't defend d4 and stop pawn breaks with b5, but at this point it is clear that other moves are also losing.} (56... dxc4+ 57. Kxc4 Kb7 58. b5 axb5+ 59. Kxb5 { is a classic outside passed pawn win. White exchanges the a-pawn for the c-pawn and runs over to win the f-pawn to win the game.}) 57. Kc2 Kd6 58. Kd2 $1 (58. Kd3 c5 59. bxc5+ $4 (59. b5 {is equal.}) 59... Kxc5 {is mutual zugzwang. Black wins the c4-pawn.}) 58... c6 (58... c5 59. bxc5+ Kxc5 60. Kd3 { is the same mutual zugzwang with Black to move.}) 59. Ke2 Kd7 (59... Ke6 60. b5 $1 {White queens the a-pawn.}) 60. Kd3 {Only now that Black's king has retreated does White step to d3, winning d4.} Kc7 61. Kxd4 Kd6 62. Kd3 Kc7 63. Ke4 Kd6 64. Kd4 1-0 [Event "chess24.com"] [Site "chess24.com"] [Date "2018.01.13"] [Round "1.1"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2834"] [BlackElo "2811"] [Annotator "DF"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Qe2 {A minor choice, generally renowned for leading to a drawish ending.} Qe7 6. d3 Nf6 7. Nc3 Qxe2+ 8. Bxe2 g6 ({On schematic grounds, I might have preferred} 8... c6 {to close off all options of Nb5 and 'dominate' the c3-knight. The followup could then be ...d5 and ...Bg4, with the idea of trying to exchange the light-squared bishop for anything, and exchange the pair of dark-squared bishops.}) 9. Nd4 a6 10. Bf4 { Now this pressures the d6-pawn, so as to prevent ...c6 following a fianchetto. Black has little choice but to play ...Nc6 one way or another, and he will be left with doubled pawns.} Bg7 (10... Nbd7 {is the maximalist move, trying to prevent Bf3 altogether.}) 11. h3 Bd7 12. Bf3 Nc6 13. Nxc6 Bxc6 14. Bxc6+ bxc6 15. O-O-O Kd7 {Objectively, there is nothing whatsoever wrong with Black's position, and as long as one doesn't get carried away with premonitions of White kings appearing on a5 after the rooks come off (echoes of Rubinstein) then it is also easy enough to play.} 16. Rhe1 Rhe8 17. Ne4 (17. Bd2 {may have been wisest, focusing on the task of exchanging all the rooks as quickly as possible and then placing pawns on light squares.}) 17... Nd5 (17... Nxe4 18. dxe4 Re6 19. f3 Rae8 20. Bd2 {is also fine but now White's moves are definitely easier to find, starting with c4, Kc2, b3.}) 18. Bd2 f5 19. Ng5 h6 20. Nf3 g5 21. c3 c5 22. Kc2 Bf6 ({The computer wants} 22... a5 {but it can never be good to allow this pawn to be fixed.}) 23. Rxe8 Rxe8 24. Re1 Rf8 25. Rh1 Re8 26. g3 g4 27. Ng1 Bg5 28. Kd1 a5 29. Ne2 {One of several acceptable moves.} (29. a4 Rb8 $1 $15 {was the point and White is being stretched a bit thin.}) 29... a4 (29... Rb8 $5 30. b3 a4 31. Bxg5 hxg5 {is a little bit testing, perhaps}) 30. Bxg5 hxg5 31. hxg4 fxg4 32. Rh5 Re5 33. Rh7+ Ke6 34. a3 (34. d4 {screams out to be played, but there is nothing much going on here either:} Rf5 35. c4 Nb6 36. b3 axb3 37. axb3 Rf3 $11 {Nevertheless, this was marginally safer for White than the game.}) 34... Rf5 35. c4 Nf6 36. Rh2 { It looks slightly dangerous to a human to allow ...Rxf2, because ...Nd7-e5 with pressure will follow soon.} Rf3 37. Kc2 Nd7 38. d4 {Else White is in very obvious difficulties.} Nb6 (38... Rf5 {is a sensible engine suggestion; this keeps a bit of pressure by not clarifying the situation of the d4-pawn.} 39. Kd3 (39. Rh7 Nb6 40. dxc5 Rxc5 $36) 39... Rf7 {An engine move; what was your first clue?} 40. Rh6+ $6 Ke7 41. Rh2 cxd4 42. Nxd4 Ne5+ 43. Kc3 c5 $15) 39. dxc5 dxc5 40. Nc3 Ke5 41. Nd1 ({Presumably the expected continuation was:} 41. Nd1 Nxc4 42. Rh5 Kd4 43. Rxg5 Ne5 44. Rg7 {when White is completely out of the woods.}) 1/2-1/2 [Event "Tata Steel Masters"] [Site "chess24.com"] [Date "2018.01.13"] [Round "1.5"] [White "Jones, Gawain C B"] [Black "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2640"] [BlackElo "2753"] [Annotator "DF"] [PlyCount "72"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 Bb4+ 7. Bd2 (7. Nc3 {is the 'main line' I was taught as a kid, but it has a number of problems.} Nxe4 8. O-O Bxc3 9. d5 Ne5 (9... Bf6 {becomes needlessly messy, e.g.} 10. Re1 Ne7 11. Rxe4 d6 12. Bg5 Bxg5 13. Nxg5 O-O 14. Nxh7 $11 {and Black must be precise to draw}) 10. bxc3 Nxc4 11. Qd4 O-O $1 12. Qxc4 Nd6 13. Qf4 b6 $11 { White faces all the practical problems in this ending as his compensation does not take the form of a real attack on the king.}) 7... Bxd2+ 8. Nbxd2 d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Qb3 {Here, Black's third most common move, other than the two he played, is actually to agree a draw.} Na5 (10... Be6 {is a slightly entertaining gambit line}) 11. Qa4+ Nc6 12. Qb3 Nce7 {My feeling is that this optimism is maybe a bit misplaced, and Black soon ends up a little worse as his position is after all a bit more difficult to play.} 13. O-O O-O 14. Rfe1 c6 15. Ne4 Nb6 (15... a5 16. Ne5 f6 $11 {is the engine suggestion but you have to be reasonably sure of yourself to cue up White's future Ne6 motifs.}) 16. Bd3 Ned5 17. Nc5 {This was the position on the board when I began my game in the 4NCL (British chess league.) Shortly before leaving my room, I noted down a prediction- White to win here. It does indeed look slightly more pleasant, but of course IQP positions are always hard to play.} Nf6 18. Rac1 Rb8 { When you play such moves, you must ipso facto be slightly worse. Finding a plan for White is, however, not totally trivial.} 19. Qa3 ({One of my best ideas in the position, I think, is to try and exploit the position of the Black rook by means of a cumbersome-looking 'queen lift'.} 19. Qb4 $5 Nfd5 { If this isn't played now or next, the White queen gets to f4.} 20. Qd2 Nd7 21. Nb3 $14 {Black still lacks ways to complete his development.}) 19... a6 20. Qb3 Qc7 21. Ne4 (21. Ne5 $14 {was another relatively easy move to make, with the idea of Qd1-f3 and (if allowed) Bc2-b3! Black also lacks ...Rd8 due to a rather cheap tactic.}) 21... Nfd5 22. Nc3 Qd6 23. Be4 Bg4 $1 {Black has now completely equalised.} 24. Nxd5 (24. Ne5 Be6 25. Bxd5 Nxd5 26. Ne4 {looks tactically tricky, but Black's defenses are all in place after} Qd8 27. Nc5 Re8 $11) 24... cxd5 25. Bb1 Bxf3 {Now White lacks the dynamism he would need to try and win, and in fact if Black could get his knight to c6 he could try something. A few more good-enough moves and peace broke out.} 26. Qxf3 Rfe8 27. Qc3 g6 28. Bd3 Kg7 29. g3 Rbc8 30. Rxe8 Rxe8 31. Qb3 Re7 32. Bf1 Qf6 33. Qb4 Re4 34. Rd1 Re7 35. Rc1 Re4 36. Rd1 Re7 1/2-1/2 [Event "Tata Steel Masters"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.13"] [Round "1.7"] [White "So, Wesley"] [Black "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2792"] [BlackElo "2804"] [Annotator "DF"] [PlyCount "57"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 $5 {This is another exceedingly rare guest in elite practice.} 3. e5 Nd5 4. Nc3 e6 5. Nxd5 exd5 6. d4 Nc6 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. Bd3 { I'm not surprised Wesley So decided to avoid the absolute most critical continuation and try for a positional edge, but I'm not sure what Black's prep could have been.} (8. Qxd5 $1 {is critical, and I was once privileged to watch a sharp line being played at a neighbouring board.} d6 (8... Qb6 $6 9. Bc4 Bxf2+ 10. Ke2 O-O 11. Rf1 Bc5 12. Ng5 Nxe5 13. Nxf7 Nxf7 14. Rxf7 Qe6+ 15. Qxe6 dxe6 16. Rxf8+ Kxf8 17. Bf4 $14 {Tan,J-Bach,M Helsingor 2015 , among others.}) 9. exd6 Qb6 10. Be3 $5 (10. Qe4+ Be6 11. Qh4 Bxd6 12. Bd3 $14 {is safer}) 10... Qxb2 11. Bb5 $1 $14 {White retains an extra pawn against best play.}) 8... d6 9. exd6 Qxd6 10. O-O O-O 11. Re1 h6 12. h3 Bd7 13. Be3 {Presumably, Wesley So had in mind some idea of occupying the d4-square when he made his 8th move, but it is not possible to execute unless Black helpfully trades the bishops. With a move such as the one played Black keeps equality.} d4 (13... b6 $6 14. c3 Rfe8 15. Qd2 $14) 14. Bd2 Rfe8 15. a3 Qd5 {Thematically playing for ...Bf5.} 16. b4 Bd6 17. c4 dxc3 18. Rxe8+ Rxe8 19. Bxc3 Be6 20. Be4 Qxe4 21. Qxd6 Qc2 22. Qd2 {Instead of playing this move it is also possible to offer a draw immediately.} Qxd2 23. Nxd2 Rd8 24. Re1 Nd4 25. a4 Nc2 26. Rc1 Nd4 27. Re1 Nc2 28. Rc1 Nd4 29. Re1 1/2-1/2 [Event "Tata Steel Masters"] [Site "chess24.com"] [Date "2018.01.13"] [Round "1.4"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Adhiban, B."] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2768"] [BlackElo "2655"] [Annotator "DF"] [PlyCount "65"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. Nf3 e6 5. Be2 Ne7 6. O-O h6 {Not the move I was intending to recommend in my forthcoming book (!) but nevertheless a main line. Perhaps it is worth a detailed look!} 7. Nbd2 Bh7 8. Nb3 Nd7 9. a4 (9. Bd2 { may possibly be a better challenge to Black's ...g5-centric setup (though obviously Svidler in his preparation thought differently.) Careless play by Black would be:} Nf5 10. Rc1 g5 11. h3 Be7 12. c4 $14 {and White obtains essentially what he wants.}) 9... g5 $5 {A very logical novelty (at least according to my database.)} (9... Nf5 10. a5 Be7 {was played previously, but as in the last note ...Be7 is met well by c4.} 11. c4 $14 {Azarov,S-Kunal,M Abu Dhabi 2016}) 10. a5 a6 (10... Nf5 11. c4 $1 g4 12. Nfd2 h5 13. a6 b6 14. cxd5 cxd5 15. Nb1 $14 {seems concerning, or at least easier to play for White, as Black's king lacks shelter on either the kingside or queenside, and its home in the centre will soon come under attack. Maybe best now is ...f6, but White should be better.}) 11. c3 (11. Bd2 Nf5 12. h3 {looks sensible, keeping open the option of g4 and also thinking vaguely about the strategically desirable Ne1-d3 or Qe1/Bb4 plans.}) 11... Nf5 {Now this may be equal as ... Black will be able to choose between ...c5 and ...f6.} 12. Bd3 (12. c4 $11 { may proceed like the note to Black's 10th but Black now has b5 covered in the event of the c-pawns being swapped.}) (12. g4 Ne7 13. Be3 {is advocated by the engine but after} f6 $1 $13 {I am skeptical.}) 12... g4 13. Ne1 h5 14. Nc2 c5 { As promised, but White now tries to prove a little something and basically gets it.} (14... f6 $5 15. f4 Qe7 $132 {may have avoided giving White such easy play.}) 15. Nxc5 Nxc5 $6 (15... Bxc5 $1 16. dxc5 Nxc5 17. Nb4 Rc8 $11 { may have been easier.}) 16. dxc5 Bxc5 17. Nd4 $1 (17. Bf4 Nh4 $1 $11 {is a good wrinkle for Black, exchanging the bishops and bringing his knight to a great square on g6.}) 17... Bxd4 (17... Nh4 {may once again have been a good idea. White always lacks f4 due to Black's advanced kingside pawns.} 18. Be3 Rc8 19. Bxh7 Rxh7 20. Qd2 Rg7 $132) 18. cxd4 Rc8 {Reaching a curious position where White must be better but his position may be a little harder to play.} 19. Ra3 $6 {A strategically well-informed move, thinking about doubling on the f-file in future, but this proves impossible to arrange.} (19. Bf4 {With the simple plan of Rc1, since Black's c8-rook currently does more work than the White a1-rook.} Nh4 {If Black plays ...Ne7 then all the minor pieces come off, which is in White's interest only.} 20. Bxh7 Rxh7 21. Rc1 $14) 19... Rc7 20. Bf4 Nh4 21. Qd2 (21. Bxh7 Rxh7 22. Qd2 {is the engine opinion, still trying to arrange a rook trade with Rc1.}) 21... Bxd3 22. Bg5 Qc8 23. Rxd3 Nf5 {Almost a perfect fortress. Black has equalised for the second time! Any lingering advantage the engine gives is purely down to preference for a bishop over a knight.} 24. Qb4 Kd7 25. Qa4+ Rc6 26. Rc1 Rg8 27. Bf6 Qc7 28. g3 Rc8 29. Rc5 Ke8 30. b4 Qd7 31. Qd1 Rxc5 32. bxc5 Qb5 33. h3 1/2-1/2 [Event "Tata Steel Masters"] [Site "chess24.com"] [Date "2018.01.13"] [Round "1.2"] [White "Giri, Anish"] [Black "Hou, Yifan"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2752"] [BlackElo "2680"] [Annotator "DF"] [PlyCount "127"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Nc3 {To my mind, a fairly underestimated line, and the reason I don't often play the Petroff now.} (5. c4 {is an interesting attempt at playing move-orders, but I think Black is considered to be fine after} Nc6 $11) (5. d4 {is the main move.}) (5. Qe2 { was the first game, Carlsen-Caruana.}) 5... Nxc3 (5... Nf6 {would have been an interesting choice against Giri, considering he has championed the Black side. From what I understand, the point for White is to avoid the impulse to play too early against the c8-bishop, because that will simply encourage a fianchetto and Black will be fine.} 6. d4 Be7 7. Bd3 O-O 8. O-O Re8 9. Re1 $1 { The point of this is to force Black to commit his light-squared bishop one way or another. Even moves that do not obviously do this- such as ...d5- really do make a decision, because they make the fianchetto rather undesirable. White can play against either ...Bg4 or ...b6, but should do so in different ways and definitely should not commit to h3 just yet.} ({Following the immediate} 9. h3 b6 $1 {Black was soon fine in Vachier Lagrave,M-Giri,A Germany 2012.}) 9... Nbd7 10. Bf4 {White is slightly better, for instance} Nf8 11. h3 b6 12. Bb5 Bd7 13. a4 $14) 6. dxc3 Be7 7. Be3 {The choice is between this move and Bf4. The current move allows Black lots of ...Ne5 possibilities, which I believe he should take.} (7. Bf4 {meanwhile does not gel so well with the rest of White's kingside attack.} O-O 8. Bd3 Nd7 9. Qd2 Nc5 $11 {for instance seems fine for Black.}) 7... Nc6 8. Bd3 Be6 {White should play one of the queen moves and then castle queenside, and I think given that White has played Be3, Black should castle queenside too. No surprise then that the present game continued in that way.} 9. Qe2 (9. Qd2 Qd7 {was similar enough and a game of mine: Jackson-Fernandez, Coventry 2013.}) 9... Bf6 10. O-O-O Qe7 (10... Qd7 {is more natural to me, not worrying about White's Ng5 ideas, but more concerned with cuing up ...Bf5 in future.}) 11. Kb1 a6 12. Rhe1 O-O-O 13. h3 Rhe8 (13... h5 { is trivially easy to recommend in hindsight, but it should have been reasonably obvious that White wanted kingside space.}) 14. g4 h6 15. Nd2 $1 $14 {Now White is probably a tiny bit better, but obviously an incredible amount of technique and further errors need to be played out over the board before White can think about winning.} Bg5 16. f4 Bh4 17. Bf2 Bxf2 18. Qxf2 Qf8 19. f5 {Opting to set Black more direct problems, but ceding the e5-square. While I am not sure this is the best continuation, it could be the most practical, especially against slightly lower-rated opposition.} (19. Nf1 {seems more natural to me, waving the idea of Ng3-h5 around.}) 19... Bd7 20. f6 g6 (20... Rxe1 21. Rxe1 g5 $11) 21. Be4 Kb8 22. Nc4 Re6 $6 {In practical terms, another slight mistake. We obtain a similar structure to Carlsen-Caruana, but with the minor pieces off the board Black faces more difficulties.} 23. Bxc6 $1 Rxe1 24. Rxe1 Bxc6 25. Na5 Re8 26. Nxc6+ bxc6 27. Qg3 {The engine evaluation of 0.00 is hopelessly unhelpful for looking at this position. What is important is that White is marginally more active and has a better structure and advanced f6-pawn. Giving variations is slightly pointless here, so I shall try and confine myself to comments only.} Qh8 28. Re7 Rxe7 29. fxe7 Qe8 30. Qe3 Kc8 31. h4 Kd7 32. Qxh6 Qxe7 33. b3 $14 {White will be able to fix the f7-pawn and of course a6 is still a weakness also. Doubtless this endgame will be discussed for a while to come, including fortress possibilities and better White tries, but the contours of what White must aim for are now clear.} Qe4 34. g5 Qe5 35. Qf8 Qd5 36. Kb2 c5 37. Qg8 Qf3 38. Qf8 Qd5 39. Qg7 Qf5 40. Qg8 Qf3 41. a4 Qf1 42. Qf8 Qf5 43. Qa8 Qf1 44. Qe4 {Again, in human terms White has acheived something else- the centralisation of his queen. Black must wait around until White shows what the next stage of his plan is- though presumably it must be b4.} Kd8 45. Qg4 {A mini-zugzwang.} d5 46. a5 $1 Qe1 47. h5 {This simplifies Black's task a little bit, but does not completely give equality.} (47. Qf4 Qe6 48. Qf2 Qe7 49. Qf1 Qe6 50. b4 $14 {is another try}) 47... gxh5 48. Qxh5 Qe6 49. Qh8+ Ke7 50. b4 cxb4 51. cxb4 Kd7 $11 52. Qd4 Kc8 53. Qf6 $5 {Even the pawn endgame retains certain practical difficulties and would be an ideal candidate for the next Naiditsch book.} Qxf6+ 54. gxf6 Kd7 55. Kb3 Kc6 $4 { My educated guess is that this move arose out of a desire to win a moral battle for tempi. Against 55.Kc3 Black had ...Kd6 in mind, and so it was natural to try and avoid that 'critical square' with the present move... Well, we may never know.} ({Black had to play} 55... Kd6 $1 {to draw, and the idea is of course ...c5.} 56. c4 (56. Ka4 c6 57. Kb3 c5 $11) 56... c5 $1 57. b5 d4 58. b6 Kc6 59. Kc2 $11 {Both kings are stuck.}) 56. c4 {Suddenly White is completely winning.} d4 (56... dxc4+ 57. Kxc4 Kd6 58. b5 axb5+ 59. Kxb5 Kd7 60. a6 Kc8 61. Kc6 Kb8 62. a7+ {is even more trivial}) 57. Kc2 Kd6 58. Kd2 $3 { Amazing tempo play, but stereotyped enough.The idea is that only after Black recaptures on c5 must White play Kd3! as that position is a mutual zugzwang.} ( 58. Kd3 c5 {is once again a draw.}) 58... c6 59. Ke2 {Avoiding the d3-square for the last time.} Kd7 (59... Ke5 60. b5 $18) (59... c5 60. bxc5+ Kc6 (60... Kxc5 61. Kd3) 61. Kd2 $1 Kxc5 62. Kd3 $18) 60. Kd3 Kc7 61. Kxd4 Kd6 62. Kd3 Kc7 63. Ke4 Kd6 64. Kd4 {Not an undeserved victory, but a slightly surprising one.} 1-0 [Event "Tata Steel Masters"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.13"] [Round "1.6"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Matlakov, Maxim"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2767"] [BlackElo "2718"] [Annotator "DF"] [PlyCount "105"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. d3 b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 7. c3 d6 {Black should play this sooner or later.The alternative is essentially ...d5, which is double-edged in the Italian and probably borderline suicidal now Black has played ...b5.} 8. Bg5 h6 9. Bh4 g5 10. Bg3 {We will not be getting a repeat of the various 'draw lines' Anand has played which involve sacrifices on g5 against a castled king, and then perpetual check...} Ba7 (10... Bb6 {may keep marginally more options open, including contesting the a-file 'properly'.} 11. Nbd2 O-O 12. Qe2 Ne7 {and now} 13. d4 Ng6 $5 $132 {was an interesting and ultimately successful pawn sacrifice in Alekseev,E-Predke,A Kaliningrad 2015}) 11. Nbd2 Na5 12. Bc2 Nh5 {We are now in new territory, and Black is playing extremely inventively. However, Anand is not to be outdone.} 13. a4 $5 { Highlighting a problem with ...Ba7, but at the same time committing to playing the sacrifice that follows. White is playing maximalist chess.} (13. b4 Nc6 14. a4 $132 {might have been a more normal way to play}) 13... b4 14. cxb4 Nc6 15. b5 Nb4 16. Nc4 {White played all these moves nearly instantly.} (16. O-O $6 { may be possible, but is a bit wet and White is not having the fun after} Nxg3 17. hxg3 h5 $44) 16... Nxg3 17. hxg3 g4 {Black commits!} (17... axb5 18. axb5 Bxf2+ $2 {does not work immediately as Black's knight lacks proper access to d4.} 19. Kxf2 Rxa1 20. Qxa1 Nxc2 21. Qa4 $1 $16) (17... Bc5 $44 {was still possible, looking for compensation- I am reasonably sure it is sufficient.}) 18. Nh4 axb5 19. axb5 Bxf2+ 20. Kxf2 Rxa1 21. Qxa1 Nxc2 22. Qa4 {White had presumably envisaged this position up to ten moves in advance and liked his practical chances. White's knights hop around in pleasing ways near the Black king, while White's kingside construction with the h4-knight and (soon to be) h2-king is watertight.} Qf6+ (22... Nd4 23. b6+ Kf8 24. bxc7 Qxc7 $11 {was also interesting, but the d6-pawn is weak.}) 23. Kg1 Nd4 24. b6+ Bd7 25. Qd1 cxb6 26. Kh2 {Reaching a position which is only ever going to be hard for Black to play.} O-O (26... b5 27. Rf1 Qe7 28. Ne3 {gives White either the d5-square or g4-pawn}) 27. Rf1 Qg5 $6 {A minor inaccuracy, giving up the wrong pawn, and White's moves just keep playing themselves.} (27... Qe7 28. Ne3 Qg5 $1 {was the right time to place the queen here. Now} 29. Nhf5 Bxf5 30. Nxf5 Qh5+ 31. Kg1 Nxf5 32. Rxf5 Qg6 $11 {could follow, when White's position is still easier but his king has lost its bomb shelter.}) 28. Nxd6 $14 Be6 29. Nhf5 Nxf5 $6 (29... Rd8 30. Nxd4 Rxd6 31. Nxe6 Rxe6 32. Rf5 Qg6 33. Qb3 $14 { is similar to the last note but with White having better co-ordination. Still, this was an interesting try, not least because Black can now try and do 'nothing' e.g. ...Re8 and ...Qe6, and try to complete the fortress with ... Kh7-g6 and ...h5.}) 30. exf5 Bd5 31. Qe2 $1 Qf6 (31... f6 32. d4 {is a slightly non-obvious point until you reach the position itself, whereupon it becomes clear that White's rook needs to be on f4, and simultaneously one sees how to accomplish this.}) 32. Qxg4+ Kh7 33. Ne4 Bxe4 34. dxe4 Rd8 35. Rc1 $16 { This is now a truly thankless position as the fortress tries will never quite work and the rook ending is lost. White just plays with ideas for a few moves until he works out what he wants to do.} Rd4 36. Rc7 Rb4 37. Qe2 Kg7 38. Rc8 Qg5 39. Rc6 Rb3 40. Rc3 Rb4 41. b3 Rd4 42. Rc6 Rb4 43. Qf3 Kh7 44. Rd6 Kg7 45. Rd5 {Now White's rook is the centralised one!} Qf6 46. Kg1 Kh7 47. Qd3 Kg7 48. Kf2 Rd4 $2 {Understandable in view of the various rook-trap motifs White has, but the last try was to wait for Qc3 before doing this, so that the recapture would come with tempo and then Black might get a good square like e3 or e5 for his queen.} (48... Qe7 49. Kf3 Qf6 50. Qc3 Rd4 51. Rxd4 exd4 52. Qd3 Qd6 $16 { is for instance not that much better for White.}) 49. Rxd4 exd4 50. Qb5 Qd8 51. Qd5 Qf6 52. g4 Kg8 53. Kf3 {Black had no desire to play out the queen ending, especially since e5 will win a further pawn.} 1-0 [Event "Tata Steel Masters"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.13"] [Round "1.3"] [White "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Black "Wei, Yi"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2787"] [BlackElo "2743"] [Annotator "DF"] [PlyCount "109"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. d4 Nf6 5. O-O O-O 6. c4 dxc4 7. Na3 {A good move to play for a long technical battle!} c5 8. dxc5 c3 {The approved method of gaining equality, but I think Black might have to take the pawn on the next move to prove it.} (8... Qxd1 {was tried recently, but it is more unpleasant for Black.} 9. Rxd1 Nfd7 10. Nxc4 Nxc5 11. Be3 $16 {Meier,G-Edouard,R Germany 2017}) 9. Nb5 $1 Na6 (9... cxb2 10. Bxb2 Bd7 11. Qb3 Bc6 12. Rfd1 {was a previous Kramnik game: Kramnik,V-Topalov,V London 2016; here I think ...Qa5 and then ...Nbd7 offers Black reasonable play.}) 10. Nxc3 Nxc5 11. Be3 Nfe4 12. Nxe4 Nxe4 13. Bd4 Bxd4 14. Qxd4 Qxd4 15. Nxd4 Nd6 {Unbelievably, this had all been seen before, and from Wei Yi's next move, it is clear that he had seen the precedent.} 16. Rac1 (16. Rfc1 Rd8 17. Rc7 Kf8 18. Rac1 Ne8 19. R7c4 Nd6 20. Rc5 Bd7 $11 {was equal and ultimately drawn in Ding,L-Giri,A Palma de Mallorca 2017}) 16... Rd8 (16... e5 17. Nb3 Be6 {was now worthy of note, and while I might think it's an equalising route, we will just have to wait for Kramnik to beat another elite player to find out what he had in mind here!}) 17. f4 {This approach goes better with the rook on f1 than a1, as White wants to bring it to d1 next.} Kf8 18. Kf2 Bg4 19. h3 Bd7 20. e4 (20. Rc7 $5 { appeals to me, as I think the e4-e5 push gains in strength from there being no rooks on the board.}) 20... Rac8 (20... Nb5 $1 {was still objectively equal if a little unpleasant over the board:} 21. Nxb5 (21. Rfd1 Nxd4 22. Rxd4 Be6 $15) 21... Bxb5 22. Rfd1 Rxd1 23. Rxd1 Rc8 24. Rd2 f6 $11) 21. Rxc8 (21. e5 { may have been good, taking advantage of a moment when Black is not able to reply with ...Nb5 and must worry about the b7-pawn.} Nf5 22. Ne2 Bb5 $1 { This accurate move may be needed to hold the balance. There could follow} 23. Rxc8 Rxc8 24. Rc1 Rxc1 25. Nxc1 b6 26. Be4 {and Black should just be equal with one or two more good moves.}) 21... Rxc8 22. Rd1 {The point seems to be that after ...Nb5 White now intends Ne2!, a4, and Nc3.} Ke8 23. e5 Nf5 24. Nb3 Bc6 (24... Rc2+ 25. Rd2 Rxd2+ 26. Nxd2 b6 {would have led to a similar ending to the last note.}) 25. Rc1 {Now I think White has a little something!} Kd7 26. Nc5+ Ke8 27. Nd3 (27. Na6 $5 {is rather flashy for a move that is only trying to inflict pawn weaknesses on the opponent, but Black seems to be fine after the accurate} Nd4 $1 $11) 27... Kd7 28. g4 {Giving Black a major headache- his best move now requires a wrinkle to make it playable.} Nd4 (28... Bxg2 29. e6+ fxe6 30. Ne5+ Kd8 31. Nf7+ Kd7 32. Rxc8 Kxc8 33. Kxg2 Nd6 34. Ng5 {looks slightly unpleasant for Black, though the machine notes that he draws with the only move} e5 $1 35. fxe5 h6 $1 $11) 29. Rc4 Ne6 30. f5 gxf5 31. gxf5 Ng7 ( 31... Nd8 $14 {limited the damage by not allowing another isolated pawn, though the co-ordination and space deficits are still there.}) 32. Bxc6+ bxc6 ( 32... Rxc6 33. e6+ $1 Ke8 34. exf7+ Kf8 35. Rxc6 bxc6 36. b4 Nxf5 37. Ne5 Nd4 38. a4 $18) 33. Nc5+ Kc7 34. Rh4 h5 (34... Rh8 35. Rb4 Nxf5 36. Rb7+ Kc8 37. Rxa7 $18) 35. f6 {Winning a pawn by force.} exf6 36. exf6 Ne8 37. Rxh5 Nxf6 38. Rf5 Nd5 39. Rxf7+ Kd6 40. Ne4+ Ke5 41. Nd2 a5 {Black has played well these last ten moves, keeping active even at the cost of a pawn, but unfortunately White's position is probably winning with best play.} 42. Nc4+ Ke6 43. Rh7 Rb8 44. Ke2 Kf5 45. Rh6 Nf6 46. h4 a4 47. Kd3 c5 (47... Rd8+ $16 {would have continued to put up more active resistance}) 48. Ne3+ Ke5 49. h5 $6 (49. Rg6 $1 $18 {forces Black's king back for tactical reasons. The position can't be held anymore.}) 49... Rd8+ {In the game again! I suspect there was an element of time pressure here.} 50. Kc4 $6 Ne4 $4 (50... Rd2 $1 $11 {is a sudden draw; the subtlety here is that while Black can't take on b2 immediately, he does have} 51. Kxc5 Ne4+ 52. Kc6 Kd4 $1 53. Nf5+ Ke5 {The knight has no good way to avoid the attention of the Black king, and Rxb2 is always on the cards.}) 51. Kb5 {Now White picks up the a-pawn and there should be no further drama.} Kd4 52. Nc4 $18 a3 53. Nxa3 Nd6+ 54. Kc6 Nf7 55. Nb5+ 1-0 [Event "Tata Steel Challengers"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.01.13"] [Round "1.4"] [White "Girya, Olga"] [Black "Gordievsky, Dmitry"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E94"] [WhiteElo "2489"] [BlackElo "2622"] [PlyCount "100"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [WhiteTeam "Russia"] [BlackTeam "Russia"] [WhiteTeamCountry "RUS"] [BlackTeamCountry "RUS"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 d6 3. Nf3 g6 4. Nc3 Bg7 5. e4 O-O 6. Be2 Na6 7. O-O e5 8. Be3 c6 9. d5 Ng4 10. Bg5 f6 11. Bh4 c5 12. Ne1 h5 13. a3 Nh6 14. f3 Nf7 15. Nc2 Bh6 16. Bd3 Bd7 17. Qe2 Nc7 18. b4 b6 19. Ne3 Ne8 20. Bf2 Ng7 21. Qc2 Nh8 22. bxc5 bxc5 23. Rab1 f5 24. exf5 gxf5 25. Rb7 Bc8 26. Rb2 Ng6 27. Rfb1 Nf4 28. Bf1 h4 29. Qa4 Bd7 30. Qa6 Qf6 31. Nb5 Bxb5 32. Qxb5 Qg6 33. Kh1 Nfh5 $1 {For the first of two times, Black places a knight on h5 with devastating effect.} ( 33... Ngh5 $2 34. Bxh4 {This is why the f-knight goes to h5. h4 is not capturable while e3 hangs.}) 34. Qb3 Ng3+ 35. Kg1 (35. hxg3 $2 hxg3 {Black either wins f2 or mates with Qh5+ - or both.}) 35... e4 36. hxg3 {Girya decides that the capture must be attempted.} (36. fxe4 Nxe4 {gives Black great activity and open lines on the kingside.}) 36... hxg3 37. Be1 Rae8 $6 (37... Rab8 $1 {immediately decisive.} 38. Qc3 Bxe3+ 39. Qxe3 Rxb2 40. Rxb2 f4 41. Qxe4 Qh6 42. Bd3 Qh2+ 43. Kf1 Qh1+ 44. Ke2 Qxg2+ 45. Kd1 Qxb2 {The stunning point. ...Rab8 forced this entire sequence, winning the loose rook on b2. Engines are impressive.}) 38. Nd1 e3 {The more patient approach also leaves Girya no way to defend.} (38... Bf4 $1 {defending g3 prepares the queen's infiltration on the h-file. Black is winning.}) 39. Bd3 Nh5 {The knight is headed to f4 in good time and even more directly, the queen is headed to the h-file now that g3 is defended. ...Qg5 and ...Bf4 were also good.} 40. Nc3 Nf4 (40... Qg5 $1 {intending ...Qh4 was devastating.}) 41. Qc2 e2 $1 {What does this threaten? ...Bg7-Bd4!} 42. Bxf5 Qh5 43. Bxg3 Bg7 $1 44. Be6+ Rxe6 45. dxe6 Bd4+ 46. Bf2 Qg5 (46... Nh3+ {was a nice mate in 7 pointed out by the engine, but Black wins cleanly and prettily in the game as well.} 47. gxh3 Bxf2+ 48. Kxf2 Qxf3+ 49. Kg1 Qg3+ 50. Kh1 Rf1+ 51. Rxf1 exf1=R#) 47. g4 Qh4 {a pretty cross-pin.} 48. Qxe2 Nxe2+ 49. Rxe2 Qg3+ 50. Kf1 Qxf3 0-1 [Event "80th Tata Steel GpA"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Date "2018.01.14"] [Round "2.2"] [White "Giri, Anish"] [Black "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A13"] [WhiteElo "2752"] [BlackElo "2787"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "69"] [EventDate "2018.01.13"] 1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 Bb4 {A pet line of the Lithuanian GM Rozentalis. Giri was happy that Kramnik deviated from his superb opening preparation, but not for long...} 3. Qb3 Ba5 ({Also possible is} 3... a5 4. a3 Bxc3 5. Qxc3 Nf6 6. b3 O-O 7. Bb2 d6 8. e3 e5 {building a wall on the dark squares as in Aronian,L (2785) -Riazantsev,A (2671) Sharjah 2017}) 4. Nf3 c5 5. d4 $146 {Move number five and already a novelty.} ({The position is fresh though; the only other test so far saw} 5. g3 Nf6 6. Bg2 Nc6 7. O-O O-O 8. d3 d6 9. e4 h6 10. h3 e5 { with complex game, Bezman,V (2395)-Jascenko,O (2180) St Petersburg 1994}) 5... Nf6 6. dxc5 Na6 7. Be3 Ne4 {Now the game finally enters Nimzo-Indian waters.} 8. g3 Naxc5 9. Qc2 {But it's Nimzo-Indian that's favorable for Black, as "he somehow tricked me in the opening to move the queen twice Qd1-b3-c2." (Giri)} Bxc3+ {Sooner or later Black will play this, but he could have also started with either} (9... d6) ({or} 9... b6) 10. bxc3 b6 11. Bg2 Bb7 12. O-O O-O 13. Rfd1 {The opening was a big success for the 14th world champion. All his light pieces are excellent, while the white pawns on the queenside are obvious targets.} Qe7 ({Giri was seriously afraid of} 13... Qc7 $1 {which would have prevented his plan. "I was hoping for a draw here."}) 14. a4 $1 {Now the Dutch GM not only removes one of his weaknesses but he creates a weakness on Kramnik's camp too.} d6 15. a5 f5 {Inaccurate.} ({Correct was to drop the knight at once in order to oppose the light-squared bishop with} 15... Nf6 $1 { An additional bonus is that White cannot attack the b-pawn easily either:} 16. Rdb1 $2 ({If White plays in a similar way as in the game} 16. Nd4 {then} Bxg2 17. Kxg2 Ng4 {followed by Ng4-e5 allows Black a chance to attack the weakness on c4 at once.}) 16... Be4 {since the e4 square is effectively used by the bishop too.}) 16. axb6 axb6 17. Nd4 Nf6 18. Bxb7 Nxb7 {Forced.} (18... Qxb7 19. Rxa8 Rxa8 20. Nb5 {drops the pawn on d6.}) 19. Rxa8 Rxa8 20. Nb5 {The white pawns are still horrible but he got plenty of activity to compensate for it.} ( 20. Qb3 {was less convincing after} Ng4 21. Bc1 ({The pawn is not worth the crippled strcuture after} 21. Qxb6 Nxe3 22. fxe3) 21... Ne5) 20... Rc8 ({ Instead} 20... Nd7 $1 {would not save the pawn due to the small trick} 21. Nxd6 ({Therefore} 21. Bf4 $5 {might be more interesting in order to develop the initiative.}) (21. Qd2 Ne5 22. Nxd6 Nxd6 23. Qxd6 Qxd6 24. Rxd6 Nxc4 25. Rxe6 Rc8 {transposes.}) 21... Nxd6 22. Qd3 {True, if we continue the line a bit} Ne5 23. Qxd6 Qxd6 24. Rxd6 Nxc4 25. Rxe6 Rc8 {transposes.} 26. Re7 (26. Bd4 $2 { self-traps the rook} Kf7) 26... Kf8 27. Rb7 Nxe3 28. fxe3 Rxc3 {we see that it should all end peacefully.}) 21. Qa2 ({Also promising for White looks} 21. Bxb6 Rxc4 22. Ra1 Rc8 23. Ra7) 21... d5 {Not the move that Kramnik wanted to make, but there is nothing else.} ({Not} 21... Rc6 $2 22. Qa8+ Kf7 23. Ra1 {and White wins.}) 22. Bg5 {Mounts pressure against the pawns.} ({Both} 22. Qa7) ({ Or} 22. Bxb6 {were promising as well.}) 22... Rxc4 ({White is clearly better after} 22... dxc4 23. Qa7) 23. Qa8+ (23. Bxf6 gxf6 24. Qa6 Qd7 {hsould be holdable for Black.}) 23... Kf7 $3 {"Brilliant!" (Giri)} ({The Dutch GM was hoping for} 23... Nd8 24. Bxf6 Qxf6 25. Rxd5 $1 exd5 26. Qxd5+ {which will help him regain the material with interest. Now} Qf7 {is definitely not great due to} 27. Qxd8+ Qf8 28. Qd5+ Qf7 29. Qxf7+ Kxf7 30. Nd6+ {Hm , weren't we playing chess, rather then checkers?}) 24. Ra1 {Good that White has strong pressure along the a-file no matter what.} ({Obviously Giri saw from afar the trick} 24. Qxb7 Qxb7 25. Nd6+ {but here he finished the line} Ke7 26. Nxb7 Rc7 {and the conclusions did not thrill him...}) 24... Na5 25. Qb8 Rc6 {Both players were down to five minutes on their clocks and as we know it, it is way easier to attack than to defend when low on time.} ({Stronger was} 25... Nc6 26. Qxb6 Kg6 27. Bxf6 Kxf6 28. Ra8 {with good chances to hold.}) 26. Nd4 Rxc3 { Brave, daring, or reckless?} ({More resilient was} 26... Rd6 27. Nf3 Qd8 ({ But not} 27... Kg6 28. Ne5+ $1 Kxg5 29. Qxd6 Qxd6 30. Nf7+ Kg6 31. Nxd6) 28. Ne5+ Kf8 29. Qa7 Qe7 {and I do not see anything decisive for White.}) 27. Qxb6 Nc4 28. Qb8 Nd7 $2 {A blunder, which loses on the spot.} ({The only chance was: } 28... Ra3 $1 {although then White still has huge attack with} 29. Rb1 Qe8 30. Rb7+ Kg6 {with a choice between promisng endgame with} 31. Qxe8+ ({Or attack after} 31. Qc7 $5) 31... Nxe8 32. Nxe6) 29. Bxe7 Nxb8 30. Bb4 $1 {All of a sudden, the rook is trapped.} e5 31. Ra7+ Kg8 (31... Kf6 32. Bxc3 exd4 33. Bxd4+) 32. Bxc3 exd4 33. Bxd4 Nc6 34. Rxg7+ Kf8 35. Bf6 1-0 [Event "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Date "2018.01.14"] [Round "2.1"] [White "Adhiban, Baskaran"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C47"] [WhiteElo "2655"] [BlackElo "2834"] [PlyCount "72"] [EventDate "2018.01.13"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. Nxd4 Bb4 6. Nxc6 bxc6 7. Bd3 d5 8. exd5 O-O 9. O-O cxd5 10. Bg5 c6 11. Qf3 Bd6 12. Rae1 Rb8 13. b3 (13. Nd1 h6 14. Bxf6 Qxf6 15. Qxf6 gxf6 {½-½ Efimenko,Z (2689)-Nikolic,P (2638) Valjevo 2012} ) 13... a5 $146 (13... h6 14. Bxf6 Qxf6 15. Qxf6 gxf6 16. Ne2 c5 17. Ng3 { ½-½ Mohr,G (2495)-Leventic,I (2448) Bol 2013}) 14. h3 h6 15. Bxf6 Qxf6 16. Qxf6 gxf6 17. Ne2 c5 18. Ng3 Rd8 19. Nf5 Bf8 20. Ne7+ Bxe7 21. Rxe7 Be6 22. Rd1 c4 23. Be2 a4 24. bxa4 Bf5 25. Bf3 $2 ({After} 25. c3 {it's White who is slightly better.}) 25... d4 26. a5 $2 {Just two mistakes and White is lost.} ({ A long computer variation goes} 26. Re2 Rb2 27. Red2 d3 28. cxd3 c3 29. Rxb2 cxb2 30. Rb1 Rb8 31. Be4 Be6 32. a5 Bxa2 33. Rxb2 Rxb2 34. a6 Rb1+ 35. Kh2 Ra1 36. a7 Bd5 37. Bxd5 Rxa7 38. g4 {which is probably a draw.}) 26... Bxc2 27. Rc1 Rb1 $1 28. Rxb1 Bxb1 29. Rc7 c3 30. Bd1 Ra8 31. Rc5 Bxa2 32. Bc2 Be6 33. Kf1 Rc8 34. Rxc8+ Bxc8 35. Ke2 Ba6+ 36. Kf3 d3 0-1 [Event "Wijk aan Zee"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.14"] [Round "2.2"] [White "Giri, Anish"] [Black "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2752"] [BlackElo "2787"] [Annotator "DF"] [PlyCount "69"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 Bb4 3. Qb3 {I was intrigued by this opening, and looked around it a bit, finding that it is indeed played reasonably often by really top players, but probably should not promise anything, at least on a cursory investigation.} Ba5 (3... a5 {is a stereotypical 'Bogo' way to play, and after} 4. a3 Bxc3 5. Qxc3 Nf6 6. b3 O-O 7. Bb2 d6 8. e3 e5 9. d4 Nc6 $11 {Black was fine in Aronian,L-Riazantsev,A Sharjah 2017}) 4. Nf3 c5 (4... Nf6 {was played in an old Conquest-Rozentalis game, but doubtless Giri had something else quite inventive up his sleeve, for instance} 5. g4 $5 $13) 5. d4 Nf6 6. dxc5 $5 {Not holding back, Giri makes a double-edged decision that might score worse on the engine pane, but is nearly certain to get him the bishop pair and hence an imbalanced position.} (6. e3 {might well be more solid, and Black needs to be careful that he does not transpose to an awkward Nimzo. This can be acheived with} cxd4 $6 7. exd4 d5 8. cxd5 Nxd5 9. Bd3 $14 {and for this reason Black should prefer something like 6...d6.}) 6... Na6 7. Be3 Ne4 8. g3 Naxc5 9. Qc2 Bxc3+ (9... Nxc3 10. bxc3 b6 11. Bg2 {is a hard thing for a human to play as Black, with the backward d-pawn and the wayward bishop on a5.}) 10. bxc3 b6 11. Bg2 Bb7 12. O-O O-O 13. Rfd1 Qe7 {Now we have more or less the position that White signed up for on move 6. A simplistic evaluation would be 'equal', a better one would be 'equal for kids or blitz players, better for Black from 1800 to 2600 in classical, and messy above that!'} 14. a4 {One problem Black has is that he cannot block the a5-push.} d6 (14... f5 15. a5 e5 16. axb6 axb6 {might have been preferable for Black, who intends ...f4 soon- the plan is very easy to grasp.}) 15. a5 f5 16. axb6 axb6 17. Nd4 Nf6 18. Bxb7 Nxb7 19. Rxa8 Rxa8 20. Nb5 Rc8 $6 {Leaving the a-file, which White eventually exploits, and he could in fact have done so a bit faster.} (20... Nd7 $1 {is sensible, heading for c5 with one knight and either a5 or e5 with the other, and keeping the Nimzo-typical ...Rc8 in reserve. White wins a pawn with} 21. Nxd6 Nxd6 22. Qd3 Ne5 23. Qxd6 Qxd6 24. Rxd6 Nxc4 25. Rxe6 {but after} Rc8 $3 {his pieces are so badly tangled that he must give it back to get out.} 26. Re7 Kf8 27. Rb7 Nxe3 28. fxe3 Rxc3 29. e4 fxe4 30. Rxb6 $11) 21. Qa2 (21. Bxb6 Rxc4 22. Ra1 $16 ) 21... d5 22. Bg5 {A reasonable human way of using the a-file.} Rxc4 $6 (22... Qd7 $5 23. Bxf6 gxf6 $132 {is quite a random defensive attempt, but it seems okay.}) (22... dxc4 23. Qa7 $16) 23. Qa8+ Kf7 24. Ra1 Na5 25. Qb8 Rc6 26. Nd4 Rxc3 $2 (26... Rd6 $1 {leaves Black facing a string of tactical problems, but his pieces aren't as poorly linked as in the game.} 27. Bf4 (27. Nf3 Qd8 28. Ne5+ Kf8 29. Qa7 Qe7 30. Qa6 Nb3 31. Rb1 Nc5 $44) 27... Rd7 28. Qxb6 Nc4 29. Qb8 Qe8 $11) 27. Qxb6 {Now Black should be lost, which seemingly is only discovered by playing down lines with the engine rather than just letting it run.} Nc4 28. Qb8 Nd7 {The final mistake, getting the rook trivially trapped.} (28... Ra3 29. Rb1 Kg6 {is the engine attempt, and now White may have nothing better than an almost-definitely-winning ending with} 30. Rb7 Qe8 31. Qxe8+ Nxe8 32. Nxe6 $16) 29. Bxe7 Nxb8 30. Bb4 $18 e5 31. Ra7+ Kg8 32. Bxc3 exd4 33. Bxd4 Nc6 34. Rxg7+ Kf8 35. Bf6 1-0 [Event "Tata Steel Masters"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.14"] [Round "2.4"] [White "Hou, Yifan"] [Black "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Result "0-1"] [WhiteElo "2680"] [BlackElo "2804"] [Annotator "DF"] [PlyCount "96"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. exd5 exd5 5. Bd3 Nc6 6. a3 Ba5 {This is optimistic. Bxc3 is the move you play if you would like to hold a solid draw.} 7. Nge2 Nge7 8. O-O O-O 9. Bg5 (9. Na4 $5 {demands attention, because the bishop pair is almost never bad to have. An old game by an (East) German grandmaster went:} Bf5 10. Nc5 Qc8 11. Bg5 Bb6 12. b4 Bxc5 13. dxc5 Re8 $11 { Schmittdiel,E-Uhlmann,W Germany 1992}) 9... f6 10. Be3 Bf5 11. Nf4 $6 {The computer sees no problem with this, but compared to move 6, Black is much better developed and ready to take advantage of the structural problem this implies.} Bxc3 12. bxc3 Qd7 13. c4 Bxd3 (13... Na5 {is the engine recommendation, but the compact structure after} 14. cxd5 Nxd5 15. c4 Nxe3 16. fxe3 {may be better for White than it thinks.}) 14. Qxd3 Rad8 15. Rab1 (15. cxd5 Nxd5 16. Nxd5 Qxd5 17. c4 $132 {is worth a look: the blitzy ...Ne5 gets the knight trapped, and when White gets d5 in his bishop will be of equal value to the knight.}) 15... b6 16. Rb5 $6 {Now Black is slightly better already — this rook is tactically weak and does not coordinate well with the rest of the pieces.} dxc4 17. Qxc4+ Rf7 18. Rd1 {This doesn't help either — now everything comes with tempo.} Na5 19. Qd3 c6 20. Rbb1 Qf5 $15 21. a4 (21. Qe2 Nd5 22. Nxd5 cxd5 23. Qd3 {might not be so dreadful}) 21... g5 $1 22. Nh5 Qxd3 23. Rxd3 Nd5 24. Bd2 Nc4 {This position is almost winning at the elite level, and Mamedyarov's 'tactically informed technique' is nearly perfect.} 25. Re1 h6 26. h4 (26. Re6 Rd6 27. Re8+ Kh7 28. h3 {may have been worth a try, just to keep two active pieces}) 26... Kh7 27. g4 gxh4 28. Re6 Rd6 29. Rxd6 Nxd6 30. f3 f5 $19 31. Be1 a5 32. Bxh4 b5 33. Ra3 Nc4 34. Ra1 fxg4 35. fxg4 Nde3 36. Nf6+ Kg6 37. d5 cxd5 38. axb5 Rxf6 {Gaining material, though there might have been some last bit of optimisation to do.} (38... Nxc2 39. Rc1 (39. Rb1 Nd2 $19) 39... Nd4 40. Kg2 Rxf6 41. Bxf6 Kxf6 42. Rb1 Nb6 {obtains the same position with the c2-pawn gone.}) 39. Bxf6 Kxf6 40. c3 (40. Kf2 Nxg4+ 41. Kf3 Nge5+ 42. Kf4 {was the last try to pose practical problems, in my opinion}) 40... Ke6 $19 {Now Black's pieces all have defined roles: the Black king will stop the b-pawn, and then take it once the a-pawn has distracted White's rook.} 41. b6 Kd7 42. Rb1 Kc8 43. b7+ Kb8 44. Kf2 a4 45. Ke2 a3 46. Kd3 Nxg4 47. Kd4 Nd2 (47... Nge3 {and ...Nc2 and ...a2 would have been as per the original plan, but there is a tactic instead.}) 48. Rb4 a2 0-1 [Event "Tata Steel Masters"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.14"] [Round "2.1"] [White "Adhiban, B."] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "0-1"] [WhiteElo "2655"] [BlackElo "2834"] [Annotator "DF"] [PlyCount "72"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. Nxd4 Bb4 6. Nxc6 bxc6 7. Bd3 d5 8. exd5 O-O 9. O-O cxd5 10. Bg5 c6 11. Qf3 {It is interesting how these things change. In 2008 this line was taught to me from the White side by Ukrainian-Israeli GM Boris Alterman; shortly after became an IM (in 2011) I viewed it as primarily a drawing weapon and now I think it's just a way to get a long and strategically messy game which the better player will probably win. That is in fact what occurred.} Bd6 (11... Rb8 12. h3 {probably brings White a little bit closer to his dream of Na4, b3, c4, Bf4 and Rad1.}) (11... Be7 { is more played and is most solid, but the doubled f-pawns are not something to get that scared about.}) 12. Rae1 {Possibly preparation, but in any case quite logical to take the e5-square from Black's bishop.} (12. h3 {is main, and now a tactic worth knowing is} Rb8 13. b3 Be5 14. Bf4 $5 {although it doesn't necessarily promise White anything after} Bxc3 15. Bxb8 Bxa1 16. Rxa1 Bg4 17. hxg4 Qxb8 $11 {as in Morozevich,A -Kramnik,V Moscow 2013. However, we were not destined to see another bishop-vs- knight-and-solid-d5-centre draw this round.} ) 12... Rb8 13. b3 {Keeping equality.} (13. Na4 h6 $1 $15) 13... a5 (13... Bb4 {tries to take advantage of White's tactically vulnerable pieces. There could follow:} 14. Qg3 Bd7 {and I assume Carlsen saw this and steered clear due to the drawing line} 15. Qh4 $1 h6 16. Bxh6 $11) 14. h3 h6 15. Bxf6 Qxf6 16. Qxf6 gxf6 17. Ne2 c5 18. Ng3 Rd8 19. Nf5 {So White has emerged with a marginally more comfortable position from the opening, but Black isn't giving up on trying to win just yet.} Bf8 $1 {Bishops of the same colour always offer more imbalance, and in this case White needs to be concerned about the ...c4 push too.} (19... Bxf5 20. Bxf5 a4 21. g3 axb3 22. axb3 Be5 $11 {would be a reasonably solid way to make a draw}) 20. Ne7+ Bxe7 21. Rxe7 Be6 22. Rd1 (22. Ra7 $1 {As always, White should exchange precisely one pair of rooks, and this poses Black some significant problems.} Ra8 (22... c4 23. Be2 {is inconvenient for Black as he doesn't obtain enough in case of ...c4, but also bad is} Ra8 24. Rxa8 Rxa8 25. f4 $14) 23. Rxa8 Rxa8 24. f4 (24. g4 h5 $11) 24... f5 $1 ( 24... Kf8 25. Kf2 Ke7 26. g4 $14 {leads to the same problem as in Giri-Hou yesterday, and a Rubinstein game about 100 years ago: the isolated rook's pawn is often a major weakness.}) 25. g4 fxg4 26. f5 Bd7 27. hxg4 Re8 $11) 22... c4 23. Be2 a4 {Now Black is having some fun: possibly Adhiban missed from afar that ...Rxc2 can pin a bishop to a c7-rook a few moves into certain lines.} 24. bxa4 Bf5 $6 {Either an inaccuracy or a slight gamble. Either way, it makes the game look a bit less 'smooth' given that it is a win in the end, but also increased the likelihood of that being the result.} (24... Kf8 25. Rc7 Rb2 $132 {was for instance one reasonable continuation for Black}) 25. Bf3 $6 {Missing the accidental chance.} (25. c3 $1 Ra8 (25... d4 26. Bxc4 dxc3 27. Rxd8+ Rxd8 28. Bb3 $14) 26. Rc7 $1 {The point is that White can use the pin on the d-file, and for this reason Black is unable to take on a4. For instance:} Be6 27. f4 f5 28. Rd2 $14) 25... d4 $1 $15 26. a5 $2 (26. Re2 Rb2 27. Red2 {is the engine suggestion but following} d3 $5 {it is also a bit depressing, e.g.} 28. cxd3 ( 28. c3 Rb6 29. a5 Ra6 $15) 28... c3 29. Rxb2 cxb2 30. Rb1 Rb8 31. Be4 Be6 32. a5 Bxa2 33. Rxb2 Rxb2 34. a6 Rb1+ 35. Kh2 Ra1 36. a7 Bd5 37. Bxd5 Rxa7 $15 { and the endgame should be held, especially at this level: bishop goes to f5 and is supported by g4, for instance, but it requires a certain appetite for suffering to go in for this.}) 26... Bxc2 $19 27. Rc1 Rb1 28. Rxb1 Bxb1 29. Rc7 c3 {The engine takes a while to realise, but White is toast.} 30. Bd1 (30. Kf1 Re8 {snares the a5-pawn in a reasonably funny way}) 30... Ra8 31. Rc5 Bxa2 32. Bc2 Be6 33. Kf1 Rc8 34. Rxc8+ Bxc8 35. Ke2 Ba6+ 36. Kf3 d3 {A very well played game!} 0-1 [Event "Tata Steel Masters"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.14"] [Round "2.6"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Jones, Gawain C B"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2811"] [BlackElo "2640"] [Annotator "DF"] [PlyCount "137"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 {I'm not sure what else one expects from Gawain Jones!} 5. h3 O-O 6. Be3 e5 7. d5 {The Petrosian systems are a good place for both sides to show class as they lead to long and yet complicated games, so this was a predictable choice from Caruana, but as Gawain mentioned yesterday, he is not in this event as decoration and can give as good as he gets in complex positions.} Na6 8. g4 Nc5 9. f3 h5 $5 $146 { This is new according to my database, but also quite good.} ({Previously a strong grandmaster had played for ...f5 here with} 9... Ne8 10. Qd2 f5 11. exf5 gxf5 {and lost a long game to a centre/kingside attack in Parligras, M-Demchenko,A Konya 2017}) 10. Qd2 (10. Bg5 {might have been an interesting way to execute the same idea, trying to get the Black queen a bit out of place first.}) (10. g5 Nh7 11. h4 {would have forced Black to come up with something other than the plan he showed in the game. My guess is that the intention was} f6 $5 12. Qd2 fxg5 13. hxg5 {and now if he had reached this position, Black might not have been able to resist the thematic, and ironically Petrosian-like, exchange sacrifice} Rf4 $5 14. Bxf4 exf4 15. Qxf4 Bd7 $44) 10... Nh7 11. O-O-O h4 {Black is threatened with a kingside attack, so he must prevent gxh5 opening up the whole flank.} 12. Bd3 {Black can now choose between ...f5 and .. .b5 plans.} Nxd3+ (12... a6 {is another way of playing; even though White would typically like to retain the light-squared bishop on say c2, here Black is on time with ...b5 and some pawn sacrifices.} 13. Kb1 (13. Bc2 b5 14. b4 Nb7 15. cxb5 a5 $1 $13 {is cute}) 13... Nxd3 14. Qxd3 b5 15. cxb5 axb5 16. Nxb5 Ba6 $13 {Black seems to have quite good compensation.}) 13. Qxd3 f5 14. Rh2 (14. gxf5 gxf5 15. exf5 Bxf5 16. Ne4 {was stereotyped, but maybe not advantageous after} Qe8 $11) 14... Kh8 15. Rg2 Bd7 {Black keeps tension.} (15... f4 { runs the risk that following} 16. Bf2 {and another 40 moves, Black will find himself crushed on the queenside with no moves or space.}) 16. exf5 gxf5 17. g5 f4 18. Bf2 Qe8 $6 {This is completely understandable, trying to organise ... Qh5 and ...Nf8-g6 or even ..Be8-g6, but concretely another move was better.} ( 18... Rg8 {The idea is just to use the unexpected pressure on... the g5 pawn.} 19. g6 $5 (19. Bxh4 Bh6 $11) 19... Bf6 20. Nge2 Nf8 $11 {Black will play .... Qc8 and ...Bf5 next.}) 19. Ne4 $14 Bf5 20. Bxh4 Qh5 21. Bf2 Bxe4 ({.Nf8-g6 and other extravagant maneouvres do not ultimately target the White kingside pawns, for example} 21... Rfc8 22. h4 Nf8 23. Kb1 Ng6 24. Ne2 $16 {and White can play c5 soon.}) 22. fxe4 Nxg5 23. Rg4 Nh7 (23... Bh6 {was another option, after which White is also better and may manage to get more pieces off:} 24. Rh4 Qg6 25. Nf3 $1 Nf7 26. Rg1 $16) 24. Nf3 Bf6 25. c5 Rg8 26. Rdg1 Qh6 (26... Be7 { was also possible immediately and would have maintained the option of ...Rxg4 and ...Qe8-a4.}) 27. Qf1 Be7 (27... Rxg4 28. hxg4 Rg8 $14) 28. Kc2 (28. Bh4 $1 {would have led to a situation reminiscent of Anand's game from yesterday, where White's practical advantage is larger than his actual one. For instance:} Rxg4 29. hxg4 $1 Bxh4 30. Rh1 Rg8 31. cxd6 cxd6 32. Nxh4 $16) 28... Nf6 $11 29. Ng5 Raf8 30. Ne6 Qh7 $1 31. Rh4 Nh5 32. Nxf8 Rxf8 (32... Qxe4+ $5 {led to a really interesting ending:} 33. Qd3 Qxd3+ 34. Kxd3 Bxh4 35. Ng6+ Rxg6 36. Rxg6 Kh7 37. Rg2 Bxf2 38. Rxf2 Ng3 39. cxd6 cxd6 $44 {I very much believe Black is in this game, and all three reuslts are on the cards.}) 33. Rhg4 Qxe4+ 34. Qd3 Qxd3+ 35. Kxd3 e4+ 36. Kc4 (36. Kxe4 Nf6+ 37. Kf3 $14 {would have been my choice-baby steps! Caruana wants to try and win with an extra exchange.}) 36... dxc5 37. Bxc5 Bxc5 38. Kxc5 Ng3 39. Rh4+ Kg7 40. Kd4 Rf5 41. Rxf4 $1 {The best way to give up an exchange.} (41. Rc1 Rf7 42. Rg4+ Kf8 {would have delayed the inevitable but White is going to have to sac an exchange against the rolling pawns.}) 41... Rxf4 42. Rxg3+ Kf6 43. Rb3 c6 {Now Black has to try and get 'b and a against e with rooks' as connected pawns always win in these things.} ( 43... b6 44. Rc3 e3+ $1 {was a simple-once-you-see it way to draw:} 45. Kxe3 Ke5 46. Rxc7 Rh4 47. Rxa7 Rxh3+ 48. Kd2 Kxd5 $11) 44. Rxb7 (44. dxc6 bxc6 45. Rc3 {is, strangely enough, winning, for complicated reasons we shan't go into.} ) 44... cxd5 45. Kxd5 e3 $1 {And this is the reason why Rxb7 isn't winning. Black's e-pawn is far enough advanced that White cannot take a7 and then go back.} 46. Rb3 Rf2 47. Rxe3 Rxb2 48. a4 Rb7 49. h4 Rd7+ 50. Kc5 Rh7 51. Re4 Rh5+ 52. Kd6 Kf7 53. Re7+ Kg8 {Black remembers how to draw from the side as in a Nakamura-Howell game if need be!} 54. Re4 Kf7 55. Rf4+ Ke8 56. Kc7 Ke7 57. Re4+ Kf6 58. Kb7 Rh7+ 59. Ka6 Kf5 60. Rb4 Ke6 61. a5 Kd6 62. Rf4 Rh5 63. Rg4 Kc6 64. Rb4 Rh7 65. Rc4+ Kd6 66. Rc1 Rxh4 67. Kxa7 Ra4 68. a6 Rb4 69. Ka8 $11 { Black's king is too close to the pawn.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "Tata Steel Chess Masters 2018"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.01.14"] [Round "2.1"] [White "Adhiban, B."] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C47"] [WhiteElo "2655"] [BlackElo "2834"] [Annotator "Divya"] [PlyCount "74"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [TimeControl "6000+30"] [WhiteClock "0:41:39"] [BlackClock "0:02:24"] {'C7: Scotch Four Knights and Four Knights with 4 g3} 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:07]} e5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 2. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:39]} Nc6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 3. Nc3 {[%emt 0: 00:51]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:14]} 4. d4 {[%emt 0:00:07]} exd4 {[%emt 0:00:22]} 5. Nxd4 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Bb4 {[%emt 0:00:19]} 6. Nxc6 {[%emt 0:00:13]} bxc6 { [%emt 0:00:03]} 7. Bd3 {[%emt 0:00:16]} d5 {96} 8. exd5 {[%emt 0:00:15]} O-O { [%emt 0:00:10]} 9. O-O {[%emt 0:00:03]} cxd5 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 10. Bg5 {91} c6 { [%emt 0:00:14]} 11. Qf3 {[%emt 0:00:39]} Bd6 {168} 12. Rae1 {110} Rb8 {400 This is the last move that is there in the book} 13. b3 {144} (13. Nd1 h6 14. Bxf6 Qxf6 15. Qxf6 gxf6 {1/2-1/2 (15) Efimenko,Z (2689)-Nikolic,P (2638) Valjevo 2012}) 13... a5 $146 {806} ({Another move was} 13... h6 14. Bxf6 Qxf6 15. Qxf6 gxf6 16. Ne2 c5 17. Ng3 {1/2-1/2 (17) Mohr,G (2495)-Leventic,I (2448) Bol 2013}) (13... Bb4 14. Qg3 (14. Bd2 c5 15. Nb1 Bxd2 16. Nxd2 Qa5 17. Qg3 Bg4 18. Nf3 Bxf3 19. Qxf3 Rbe8 20. Rxe8 Rxe8 21. a4 $11) 14... Be6 15. Qh4 $11) 14. h3 {311} h6 {320 White has an edge.} (14... Bb4 15. Bd2 $11) 15. Bxf6 {[%emt 0: 00:12]} Qxf6 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 16. Qxf6 {[%emt 0:00:07]} gxf6 {19 'Black has the pair of bishops'} 17. Ne2 $1 {[%emt 0:00:07]} c5 {507} 18. Ng3 {160} Rd8 { [%emt 0:00:40]} 19. Nf5 {137 'White has a very strong knight but will be exchanged soon} Bf8 {183} 20. Ne7+ {860} Bxe7 $1 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 21. Rxe7 { [%emt 0:00:06]} Be6 {78} 22. Rd1 {[%eval 26,18] 361} (22. Ra7 $16 {[%eval 71, 15]} Ra8 23. Rxa8 Rxa8 $11) 22... c4 {585 'Black gains space'} 23. Be2 {1223} a4 {[%emt 0:00:23]} 24. bxa4 {95} Bf5 {212} (24... Kf8 25. Rc7 $11) (24... d4 25. f4 f5 26. Rxe6 fxe6 27. Bxc4 Kf7 28. Re1 {is also fine for white}) 25. Bf3 {1241} (25. c3 $142 $5 $14) 25... d4 $15 {100} 26. a5 {[%eval -90,14] 532} (26. Re2 $1 $11 {[%eval 22,16]} Rb2 27. Red2 d3 28. cxd3 c3 29. Rxb2 cxb2 $15) 26... Bxc2 $17 {105} 27. Rc1 {[%emt 0:00:36]} Rb1 {402} 28. Rxb1 {586} Bxb1 {3 Endgame KRB-KRB} 29. Rc7 {[%eval -135,18] 223} (29. Rb7 $1 $15 {[%eval -65,15]} Bg6 30. Bd1 (30. Rc7 c3 $17)) 29... c3 $1 {49 [#] White must now prevent ...c2. } 30. Bd1 {172} Ra8 {153} ({But not} 30... Bxa2 31. a6 $11) 31. Rc5 {[%emt 0: 00:56]} Bxa2 {[%emt 0:00:47]} 32. Bc2 {[%eval -198,16] [%emt 0:00:16]} (32. f4 $17 {[%eval -118,15]}) 32... Be6 $19 {107} 33. Kf1 {[%eval -289,15] 126} (33. Rb5 {[%eval -194,15] keeps fighting.}) 33... Rc8 $1 {[%emt 0:00:59]} 34. Rxc8+ {[%emt 0:00:10]} Bxc8 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 35. Ke2 {208 [#] aiming for Bd3.} Ba6+ { [%emt 0:00:03]} 36. Kf3 $2 {[%eval -1383,13] [%emt 0:00:11]} (36. Kd1 {[%eval -315,19]}) 36... d3 {[%emt 0:00:19]} 37. Bxd3 Bxd3 $19 0-1 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.01.14"] [Round "2.5"] [White "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E04"] [WhiteElo "2753"] [BlackElo "2767"] [Annotator "Divya"] [PlyCount "61"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [TimeControl "6000+30"] [WhiteClock "0:30:34"] [BlackClock "0:37:11"] {'E04: Open Catalan: Nf3} 1. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} d5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} 2. g3 { [%emt 0:00:00]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:28]} 3. Bg2 {[%emt 0:00:00]} c5 {[%emt 0:00:14] } 4. O-O {[%emt 0:00:03]} Nc6 {[%emt 0:00:08]} 5. d4 {[%emt 0:00:06]} e6 { [%emt 0:00:15]} 6. c4 {[%emt 0:00:53]} dxc4 {[%emt 0:00:17]} 7. dxc5 {[%emt 0: 00:08]} Qxd1 {[%emt 0:00:18]} 8. Rxd1 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Bxc5 {[%eval 21,9] [%emt 0:00:08] last book move} 9. Nfd2 {[%eval 24,10] [%emt 0:00:06]} Na5 { [%eval 30,10] 627} (9... Nd5 $142 {[%eval 70,9]} 10. Nxc4 {[%eval 48,9]} b5 $11 {[%eval 115,5]} (10... Nd4 11. Nd6+ Bxd6 12. Rxd4 Be5 13. Rd1 Bf6 14. Nd2)) 10. Na3 $4 {[%eval 15,10] [%emt 0:00:11] 'gives the opponent counterplay'} (10. Nc3 $142 $16 {[%eval 27,10]}) 10... Bxa3 $19 {[%eval -9,12] 383} 11. bxa3 {[%eval -5,11] [%emt 0:00:07]} O-O $4 $146 {[%eval 3,10] 510 'Black is ruining his position'} ({This could have also been played as in Carlsen vs Harikrishna} 11... Nd5 12. Ne4 O-O 13. Bd2 b6 14. Rac1 Ba6 15. Bxa5 bxa5 {1-0 (39) Carlsen, M (2837)-Harikrishna,P (2744) Riadh 2017}) (11... c3 {[%eval 20,11]} 12. Nb3 { [%eval -26,9]} c2 {[%eval 102,11]} 13. Rd2 $16 {[%eval 102,8]}) 12. Ne4 $4 { [%eval 12,10] 109 'there were better ways to keep up the pressure'} (12. Bb2 { [%eval 13,10]} Nd5 {[%eval 20,9]} 13. Rac1 $11 {[%eval 34,9]}) 12... Nxe4 $17 { [%eval -11,11] 109} 13. Bxe4 {[%eval -9,10] [%emt 0:00:05]} e5 $4 {[%eval -7,9] 93 'a move that relinquishes the win'} (13... f5 $142 $5 {[%eval 46,8]} 14. Bc2 {[%eval -66,8]} c3 $17 {[%eval -1,9]}) 14. Bb2 {[%eval 13,9] 108} (14. Bd2 { [%eval 4,10]} Nc6 $15 {[%eval 21,9]}) 14... Re8 $4 {[%eval 12,7] 341} (14... Nc6 {[%eval 13,8]} 15. Rac1 $11 {[%eval -18,8]}) 15. Bc3 {[%eval 31,9] 332} Nc6 {[%eval 22,8] [%emt 0:00:15]} 16. Rab1 {[%eval 29,8] [%emt 0:00:04]} h6 { [%eval 47,6] 877} 17. f3 {[%eval 61,7] 430 White has compensation and the f3 move not only strengthens the e4 bishop but also 'Controls g4'} (17. Kg2 { [%eval 27,8]} Re7 $14 {[%eval 40,8]}) 17... Re7 {[%eval 56,8] 359} (17... Nd4 { [%eval 70,9]} 18. Kf2 {[%eval 70,8]} Rb8 $11 {[%eval 296,7]}) 18. Kf2 $14 { [%eval 49,7] 1529} f6 {[%eval 41,9] 693} 19. Bd5+ {[%eval 36,9] 348 'White forks: c4'} (19. Rd6 {[%eval 44,7]} Rc7 $11 {[%eval -28,7]}) 19... Kh7 { [%eval 46,7] [%emt 0:00:39]} 20. Be4+ {[%eval 11,13] 1045} Kg8 {[%eval 20,8] [%emt 0:00:43]} 21. Bb4 {[%eval 35,8] 252} Rc7 {[%eval 38,9] 357} (21... Nxb4 { [%eval 64,9]} 22. Rd8+ {[%eval 82,9]} Kf7 {[%eval -17,9]} 23. axb4 $11 { [%eval 4,9]}) 22. Bd6 {[%eval 37,9] 114} Rd7 $1 {[%eval 82,4] [%emt 0:00:30]} 23. Bd5+ {[%eval 56,9] 68} Kh8 {[%eval 42,10] 163} 24. Bxc4 {[%eval 56,9] 218} Nd4 {[%eval 47,10] 108} 25. Bc5 {[%eval -13,18] [%emt 0:00:08]} (25. Bb4 $5 $14 {[%eval 59,17]}) 25... Rc7 $11 {[%eval -9,13] [%emt 0:00:37]} 26. Bxd4 { [%eval 1,12] [%emt 0:00:03]} Rxc4 {[%eval -7,8] [%emt 0:00:33]} 27. Be3 { [%eval 0,9] [%emt 0:00:04]} b6 {[%eval -10,10] 119 'Prevents intrusion on c5' and also clears the way for the bishop} 28. Rd8+ {[%eval -2,11] [%emt 0:00:09]} Kh7 {[%eval -7,9] [%emt 0:00:06]} 29. Rc1 {[%eval -2,9] [%emt 0:00:02]} Rxc1 { [%eval -10,8] [%emt 0:00:10]} 30. Bxc1 {[%eval -2,7] [%emt 0:00:05]} Bb7 { [%eval -10,7] [%emt 0:00:06]} 31. Rxa8 {[%eval -34,7] [%emt 0:00:06]} 1/2-1/2 [Event "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Date "2018.01.15"] [Round "3.5"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C42"] [WhiteElo "2767"] [BlackElo "2811"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "83"] [EventDate "2018.01.13"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. d4 d5 6. Bd3 Bd6 7. O-O O-O 8. c4 c6 9. Qc2 {"Funnily enough this is the first time someone plays this against him." (Anand)} ({Indeed, Caruana's latest game from London saw:} 9. Re1 Bf5 10. Qb3 Qd7 11. Nc3 Nxc3 12. Bxf5 Qxf5 13. Qxb7 Qd7 14. Qxd7 Nxd7 15. c5 Bxh2+ 16. Nxh2 Ne4 {Vachier Lagrave,M (2789)-Caruana,F (2799) London 2017}) 9... Na6 10. a3 Bg4 11. Ne5 Bf5 12. b4 ({Avoiding the rather uninspiring:} 12. Nc3 Bxe5 13. dxe5 Nac5 14. cxd5 cxd5 {1/2-1/2 (14) Piorun,K (2631)-Wei,Y (2728) Khanty-Mansiysk 2017}) 12... Nc7 $146 {As usual Caruana is very well prepared in the opening. He comes up with an interesting novelty.} ({In the predecessor White did not achieve much after} 12... f6 13. Nf3 Bg6 14. Nc3 Nxc3 15. Bxg6 hxg6 16. Qxc3 dxc4 17. Qxc4+ Rf7 {Leko,P (2740) -Ivanchuk,V (2729) Monte Carlo 2006}) 13. f3 (13. cxd5 {allows an additional resource for Black:} cxd5 14. f3 Rc8 $1 {with the main point being} 15. fxe4 dxe4 16. Rxf5 Ne6 17. Qd1 Nxd4 18. Bxe4 $2 Rxc1 $1) 13... Bg6 $1 {"He came up with this idea which I idea missed or did not prepare." (Anand)} ({Apprently, the former world champion spent most of his preparation on the line} 13... Bxe5 14. dxe5 Bg6 {where he cannot win the knight with} 15. fxe4 $2 ({But instead White has a couple of promising options:} 15. Rd1 $5) ({or} 15. Be3 $5) 15... dxe4 16. Be2 Qd4+) 14. c5 { After long thought White rejects the offer.} ({In the line:} 14. Nxg6 fxg6 $1 15. fxe4 ({Even worse is} 15. c5 Bxh2+ 16. Kxh2 Qh4+ 17. Kg1 Ng3 18. Bb2 { when Black has a guaranteed draw with} Qh1+ ({Or may chose the even stronger} 18... Ne6 $1 {followed by Ne6-f4. (Anand)}) 19. Kf2 Qh4) 15... Qh4 {(Anand)} ({ Objectively} 15... dxe4 $1 {is stronger with the key idea} 16. Bxe4 ({Better is } 16. Rxf8+ Bxf8 17. Bxe4 Qxd4+ {with perpetual.} 18. Kf1 Qf6+ ({But Black may also chose to play on with} 18... Qxa1 19. Bb2 Qa2 20. Bd3 Bxb4 21. axb4 Rd8) 19. Kg1 Qd4+ {with perpetual.}) 16... Bxh2+ 17. Kxh2 Rxf1 {and Black wins.}) 16. g3 Bxg3 17. hxg3 (17. Qg2 $1 {might have been missed by Anand.}) 17... Qxg3+ 18. Kh1 {The Indian GM explained that here Black will always find perpetual, but one wrong move for White, or rather one missed move might lead to a loss for him. Indeed, Black seems to have decisive attack after} Qh3+ 19. Kg1 Ne6 $1) 14... Bxe5 15. dxe5 Ng5 16. Bb2 $1 {An important move. There is a problem with the knight on g5 and White wants to capitalize on it. Now the advance of the f-pawn is on the agenda. Caruana needs to react fast.} ({After} 16. Nd2 Bxd3 17. Qxd3 f5 $1 {Black manages to seal the kingside and arrange an excellent oupost for his knight on e6.}) 16... d4 $5 {This is how to solve the problem- no knight, no problem as some will say...} ({Here} 16... Bxd3 17. Qxd3 f5 {would be met with the simple} ({Anand expected instead} 17... b6 18. cxb6 axb6 19. Nd2 Nge6 20. f4 {and now} g6 21. f5 gxf5 22. Rxf5 Qh4 {although this definitely looks very risky for Black.} (22... Kg7)) 18. exf6 {spoiling Black's pawn structure.}) 17. f4 Nd5 18. fxg5 Ne3 19. Qd2 Bxd3 20. Qxd3 ({ White also checked the consequeces of the sharp} 20. Rf4 Bxb1 ({But later came to the conclusion he did well not to enter them because of} 20... Qxg5 $1 21. Rxd4 Rad8 22. Rd6 Be4 (22... Qf5 $1 {is even stronger with advantage for Black. })) 21. Rxd4 Nd5 22. Rxb1 {"It's not much of a pawn, but it is a pawn" (Anand)} ) 20... Nxf1 21. Kxf1 Qxg5 22. Nd2 Qxe5 {The forced play is over. Caruana will have a rook and a pawn versus two light pieces which is favorable for White in this particular position.} 23. Nf3 ({Later on Anand regretted that he did not go for the line that he originally intended:} 23. Nc4 $1 Qxh2 24. Qxd4 f6 ({Or } 24... Qh6 25. Nd6) 25. Nd6 {The knight on d6 is a monster which paralizes both the black rooks.}) 23... Qh5 24. Qxd4 f6 25. Qc4+ Kh8 $1 ({White was hoping for} 25... Qf7 26. Qxf7+ Rxf7 27. Nd2 {followed by Nd2-c4-d6 (Anand)}) 26. Bc1 $1 {The bishop was blunted on the long diagonal. Now it gets back in business. The d6 square is tempting for either of the white light pieces.} Rfe8 27. Bf4 a5 {Somewhere around here Caruana lost the path.} ({Correct and obvious was:} 27... Qf5 28. Bd6 Re3 {to double the rooks on the open file. After} 29. Kg1 Rae8 30. Rf1 Qg6 {Black should be OK.(Anand)}) 28. Bd6 ({ White considered} 28. bxa5 {as well, which seems less promising after} Rxa5 29. Bd6 Rb5) 28... axb4 $2 {"This is just astonishing! Now I am getting big advantage." (Anand)} (28... Qg6 $5) 29. Qxb4 Qd5 30. Qxb7 h6 ({Anand speculated that his opponent might have missed that in the forcing line} 30... Rxa3 31. Rxa3 Qd1+ 32. Kf2 Qc2+ 33. Kg3 Qg6+ {There is no perpetual because of} 34. Kh3 Qh5+ 35. Nh4 g5 36. Qb4 {and White wins.}) 31. Kg1 Ra4 32. h3 {Getting air for the king. One important observation by the former world champion was that with the bishop on d6 he is not even afraid of the sacrifices on f3 as there will be no perpetual thanks to that piece.} Rc4 (32... Re2 {does not work due to} 33. Bf8 $1) 33. Qb2 Qd3 34. Ra2 $1 {"I realized that the second rank is more dangerous than the first one." (Anand)} ({Although he also saw a win after} 34. Qd2 Qxd2 35. Nxd2 Rc2 36. Nf3 Ree2 37. Ne1 Ra2 38. Rxa2 Rxa2 39. Nd3 {followed by Nd3-b4xc6.}) 34... Qd1+ 35. Kh2 Rc1 36. a4 f5 37. Qb7 { Caruana's time trouble did not help neither, but his position is lost anyway.} f4 38. Bxf4 Rxc5 39. Rd2 (39. Qf7 Rg8 40. Qg6 {would have won as well.}) 39... Qxa4 40. Qf7 Rg8 41. Be5 Qc4 {Caruana did not wish to see the mate on the board.} 42. Rd6 $1 (42. Rd6 Qxf7 43. Rxh6#) (42. Bxg7+ $2 {does not work due to } Rxg7 43. Rd8+ Kh7 44. Ng5+ $4 (44. Qe8 Rg8 {is a draw.}) 44... Rcxg5 45. Qxc4 Rxg2+ 46. Kh1 Rg1+ 47. Kh2 R7g2#) (42. Qe7 {also complicates matters after} Rd5 ) 1-0 [Event "Wijk aan Zee"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.16"] [Round "4"] [White "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Black "Svidler, Peter"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2787"] [BlackElo "2768"] [Annotator "ChessBase"] [PlyCount "50"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:24]} 2. g3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} d5 { [%emt 0:01:15]} 3. Bg2 {[%emt 0:00:00]} g6 {[%emt 0:00:13]} 4. O-O {[%emt 0:00: 56]} Bg7 {[%emt 0:00:32]} 5. d4 {[%emt 0:00:05]} O-O {[%emt 0:00:08]} 6. c4 { [%emt 0:00:03]} c6 {[%emt 0:05:30]} 7. Ne5 {[%emt 0:00:11]} Be6 {[%emt 0:00:27] } (7... Nbd7 8. Nc3 Nxe5 9. dxe5 Ne4 10. cxd5 Nxc3 11. bxc3 cxd5 12. f4 Be6 13. Be3 f6 14. Qb3 fxe5 15. Rad1 Qc7 16. Bxd5 Bxd5 17. Rxd5 Kh8 18. fxe5 Rxf1+ 19. Kxf1 e6 20. Rd3 Qc6 21. Kg1 Bxe5 22. Qb4 Kg8 23. Bxa7 Bg7 24. Be3 h5 25. a3 Kh7 26. Qe7 Qe4 27. Qg5 Rf8 28. Rd7 Kg8 29. h3 Qb1+ 30. Bc1 Qc2 31. Rxg7+ Kxg7 32. Qe7+ Kg8 33. Qxe6+ Rf7 34. Qe8+ Rf8 35. Qe6+ Rf7 36. Qe8+ Rf8 37. Qe6+ { ½-½ (37) Kramnik,V (2810)-Ding,L (2764) Novi Sad 2016}) 8. cxd5 {[%emt 0:03: 31]} Bxd5 {[%emt 0:00:15]} 9. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:08]} (9. Bh3 c5 10. dxc5 Ne4 11. Nd3 Na6 12. Be3 Bc6 13. Qc2 Bd4 14. Bxd4 Qxd4 15. Bg2 Rac8 16. Nc3 Nxc3 17. bxc3 Qf6 {½-½ (17) Speelman,J (2645)-Kasparov,G (2760) Reykjavik 1988}) 9... Bxg2 {[%emt 0:00:48]} 10. Kxg2 {[%emt 0:00:04]} Nbd7 {[%emt 0:07:24]} 11. Qb3 { [%emt 0:06:43]} Qb6 {[%emt 0:03:42]} (11... Nxe5 $2 12. dxe5 Nd5 13. Rd1) 12. Rd1 {[%emt 0:00:31]} (12. Qxb6 axb6) 12... Qxb3 {[%emt 0:08:24]} 13. axb3 { [%emt 0:00:02]} Rfc8 {[%emt 0:18:37]} 14. f4 {[%emt 0:21:57]} (14. Be3 Nxe5 15. dxe5 Ng4 16. Bxa7 Nxe5) 14... c5 {[%emt 0:10:40]} (14... e6 15. e4) 15. Be3 { [%emt 0:03:21]} cxd4 {[%emt 0:04:08]} (15... e6 16. Nxd7 Nxd7 17. d5 Nf8 18. Bf2) 16. Rxd4 {[%emt 0:02:45]} Nxe5 {[%emt 0:03:04]} 17. fxe5 {[%emt 0:01:25]} Ne8 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 18. Rd7 {[%emt 0:02:41]} Rc7 {[%emt 0:12:45]} (18... Kf8 19. Rxb7 Bxe5) (18... Bxe5 19. Rxe7 (19. Rxb7 Nd6 20. Rbxa7 Rxa7 21. Rxa7 Nf5 22. Bb6 Bxc3 23. bxc3 Rxc3 24. b4 h5) 19... Bxc3 20. bxc3 Rxc3 21. Rxa7 (21. Bd4 Rxb3 22. Rxa7 Rd8 23. Ba1 $11) 21... Rxe3 (21... Rxa7 22. Rxe8+ Kg7 23. Bd4+) 22. Rxe3 Rxa7 23. Rxe8+ Kg7 24. Re7 Kf6 (24... Ra2 25. Rxb7 (25. Kf3 Rb2 (25... b5) 26. Rxb7) (25. Kf2 b5 26. Rb7 Ra5 27. b4) 25... Rxe2+ 26. Kh3 Rb2) 25. Rc7 h5 26. Kf3 $14) 19. Rxa7 {[%emt 0:09:26]} Rb8 {[%emt 0:08:53]} (19... Rxa7 20. Rd8 Kf8 (20... Ra1 21. Rxe8+ Bf8 22. Bh6) 21. Bxa7 Bxe5 22. Bb8 Rc5 23. b4 Bc7 24. Rc8 Rc4 25. b5 Rc5 26. Na4 Rxb5 27. Bxc7 Rb4 28. Ra8) 20. Rd5 { [%emt 0:03:49]} b6 {[%emt 0:04:50]} 21. Nb5 {[%emt 0:05:20]} Rxa7 {[%emt 0:05: 33]} 22. Nxa7 {[%emt 0:00:55]} Kf8 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 23. Rd7 {[%emt 0:01:16]} Ra8 {[%emt 0:00:10]} 24. Bd4 {[%emt 0:01:45]} f6 25. e6 (25. Bxb6 fxe5 26. Nc6 (26. Bc5)) 25... f5 1-0 [Event "80th Tata Steel Masters 2018"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.16"] [Round "4"] [White "Giri, Anish"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2752"] [BlackElo "2834"] [Annotator "ChessBase"] [PlyCount "61"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} e6 {[%emt 0:00:23]} (1... e5) 2. d4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} d5 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 3. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Bb4 {[%emt 0:00:08]} (3... Nf6) 4. e5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Ne7 {[%emt 0:00:11]} (4... c5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 Qa5 7. Bd2 Qa4 8. Qg4) 5. a3 {[%emt 0:00:27]} Bxc3+ {[%emt 0:00:10]} 6. bxc3 {[%emt 0:00: 03]} c5 {[%emt 0:00:15]} 7. Qg4 {[%emt 0:00:52]} cxd4 {[%emt 0:00:09]} 8. Qxg7 {[%emt 0:03:29]} Rg8 {[%emt 0:00:09]} 9. Qxh7 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Qc7 {[%emt 0:00: 17]} 10. Ne2 {[%emt 0:00:15]} Nbc6 {[%emt 0:00:23]} (10... Qxe5 11. cxd4) 11. f4 {[%emt 0:00:19]} (11. cxd4 Nxd4) 11... dxc3 {[%emt 0:00:08]} 12. Nxc3 { [%emt 0:05:59]} (12. Qd3 Bd7 (12... d4)) 12... Nd4 {[%emt 0:00:25]} (12... a6) 13. Bb2 {[%emt 0:09:42]} (13. Qd3) 13... Bd7 {[%emt 0:02:15]} 14. O-O-O { [%emt 0:00:58]} Qb6 {[%emt 0:00:45]} (14... Ndf5 {½-½ (73) Karjakin,S (2786) -Nepomniachtchi,I (2703) Moscow 2013}) 15. Qd3 {[%emt 0:13:31]} Ndf5 {[%emt 0: 00:19]} 16. Rd2 {[%emt 0:01:11]} (16. Nb5 Rc8 17. g3 a6 18. Nd4 Ba4 19. Rd2 Rc4 20. Bg2 Nxd4 21. Bxd4 Qb5 22. Bf1 Qc6 23. Qe2 Nf5 24. Bb2 Rh8 25. Qf2 Nxg3 26. Bxc4 Nxh1 27. Qa7 Qxc4 28. Qb8+ Kd7 29. Qxh8 Bxc2 30. Rxc2 Qf1+ 31. Kd2 Qf2+ 32. Kd3 Qf3+ 33. Kd2 Qf2+ 34. Kd3 Qf3+ 35. Kd2 {½-½ (35) Svidler,P (2747) -Vitiugov,N (2712) Paris/St Petersburg 2013}) (16. g3 Ne3 17. Nb5 Nc4 18. Nd6+ Nxd6 19. exd6 Nf5) 16... Rc8 {[%emt 0:06:56]} 17. g3 {[%emt 0:03:47]} Ne3 { [%emt 0:10:51]} 18. Ne4 {[%emt 0:14:49]} (18. Qd4 Qxd4 19. Rxd4 N7f5 20. Rd2 Nxf1 21. Rxf1 Rh8 $44) 18... Rxc2+ {[%emt 0:07:35]} (18... dxe4 19. Qxd7+ Kf8 20. Qd4 $16) 19. Rxc2 {[%emt 0:00:54]} dxe4 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 20. Qxe4 {[%emt 0: 05:59]} Nxc2 {[%emt 0:01:38]} (20... N7f5 $5) 21. Qxc2 {[%emt 0:00:07]} Bc6 { [%emt 0:01:54]} 22. Bg2 {[%emt 0:00:20]} Bxg2 {[%emt 0:00:29]} 23. Qxg2 { [%emt 0:00:05]} Nd5 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 24. Kb1 {[%emt 0:09:31]} Nc3+ {[%emt 0:00: 31]} 25. Ka1 {[%emt 0:00:24]} Qb3 {[%emt 0:00:28]} 26. Bxc3 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Qxa3+ {[%emt 0:00:09]} 27. Kb1 {[%emt 0:00:18]} Qxc3 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 28. Rc1 { [%emt 0:10:34]} Qb4+ {[%emt 0:00:15]} 29. Qb2 {[%emt 0:00:54]} Qe4+ {[%emt 0: 00:09]} 30. Qc2 {[%emt 0:00:05]} (30. Rc2 Kf8) 30... Qb4+ {[%emt 0:00:11]} 31. Qb2 {[%emt 0:00:05]} (31. Ka2 Kf8 32. Qc5+ Qxc5 33. Rxc5 Kg7 34. Rc7 Rb8 $11) 1/2-1/2 [Event "80th Tata Steel Masters 2018"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.16"] [Round "4"] [White "Wei, Yi"] [Black "Jones, Gawain C B"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2743"] [BlackElo "2640"] [Annotator "ChessBase"] [PlyCount "95"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. d4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:17]} 2. c4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} g6 {[%emt 0: 00:07]} 3. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Bg7 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 4. e4 {[%emt 0:00:06]} d6 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 5. h3 {[%emt 0:00:13]} O-O {[%emt 0:00:12]} 6. Nf3 {[%emt 0: 00:15]} e5 {[%emt 0:00:13]} 7. d5 {[%emt 0:00:19]} a5 {[%emt 0:00:25]} 8. Bg5 { [%emt 0:04:43]} Na6 {[%emt 0:02:45]} 9. Be2 {[%emt 0:01:39]} Qe8 {[%emt 0:03: 17]} 10. g4 {[%emt 0:18:03]} Kh8 {[%emt 0:10:07]} 11. Nd2 {[%emt 0:10:54]} Ng8 {[%emt 0:02:27]} 12. h4 {[%emt 0:15:59]} (12. Nf1 f6 13. Be3 f5 14. gxf5 gxf5 15. exf5 Bxf5 16. Ng3 Bh6 17. Qd2 Bxe3 18. fxe3 Qg6 19. Rg1 Nc5 20. O-O-O Qh6 21. Rg2 Qxh3 22. Rdg1 Bg6 23. Bf1 a4 24. Rh2 Qg4 25. Be2 Qg5 26. Rgg2 Qe7 27. Nb5 Be4 {½-½ (27) Miljkovic,M (2456)-Damljanovic,B (2559) Kragujevac 2013}) ( 12. Be3 f5 13. f3 Bh6 14. Bxh6 (14. g5 f4 15. gxh6 fxe3) 14... Nxh6 15. g5 Ng8 16. h4 fxe4 17. Ndxe4 (17. fxe4 Rf4 18. a3 (18. Qb3))) 12... f5 {[%emt 0:15:21] } 13. gxf5 {[%emt 0:19:57]} gxf5 {[%emt 0:00:29]} 14. Bh5 {[%emt 0:00:11]} Qd7 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 15. Qe2 {[%emt 0:00:55]} (15. exf5 Qxf5 16. Nde4 Nc5 17. Qe2 Nxe4 18. Nxe4 Nf6 19. Ng3 Qd7 20. Rg1 c6 21. Bf3 cxd5 22. cxd5 Qa4 23. Qd2 e4 24. Bd1 Qb5 25. Be2 Qxd5 26. Qxd5 Nxd5 27. O-O-O Be6 28. Nxe4 Rac8+ 29. Kb1 Nb4 30. a3 Rc2 31. Rd2 Ba2+ 32. Ka1 Bxb2# {0-1 (32) Solomon,K (2350)-Popovic,D (2553) Cappelle-la-Grande 2014}) 15... Nf6 {[%emt 0:06:13]} 16. Bf3 {[%emt 0: 02:49]} fxe4 {[%emt 0:12:18]} 17. Ndxe4 {[%emt 0:05:13]} Nxe4 {[%emt 0:01:09]} 18. Nxe4 {[%emt 0:01:08]} Nb4 {[%emt 0:19:11]} (18... b5 19. cxb5 Nb4) 19. Bg2 {[%emt 0:08:40]} (19. a3 $6 Rxf3 20. axb4 Rh3) 19... Qa4 {[%emt 0:02:19]} ( 19... c6 $5 20. a3 (20. Qd2 cxd5 21. cxd5 Qb5) 20... cxd5 21. axb4 dxe4 22. Bxe4 Qf7 23. bxa5 Be6 24. Ra4 Rfc8) 20. Nc3 {[%emt 0:05:54]} Qc2 {[%emt 0:02: 44]} 21. Be4 {[%emt 0:00:11]} Qxe2+ {[%emt 0:00:05]} 22. Kxe2 {[%emt 0:00:14]} Bg4+ {[%emt 0:02:50]} (22... Bd7) (22... Bf5) 23. f3 {[%emt 0:01:11]} Bh5 { [%emt 0:00:06]} 24. Rag1 {[%emt 0:07:11]} Rf7 {[%emt 0:00:48]} 25. Be3 { [%emt 0:00:45]} Bf6 {[%emt 0:01:42]} (25... Raf8 26. Rh3 Rd7 27. Rhg3) 26. Rg5 {[%emt 0:00:58]} Bg6 {[%emt 0:05:20]} (26... Bxg5 27. hxg5 Bxf3+ 28. Bxf3) 27. Bxg6 {[%emt 0:00:10]} hxg6 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 28. Rxg6 {[%emt 0:00:09]} Nc2 { [%emt 0:01:32]} 29. Ne4 {[%emt 0:01:38]} Be7 {[%emt 0:03:01]} 30. Ng5 {[%emt 0: 02:23]} Rf6 {[%emt 0:00:24]} (30... Bxg5 31. hxg5+ Rh7 32. Rxh7+ Kxh7 33. Re6 $18) 31. Rxf6 {[%emt 0:01:20]} Bxf6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 32. Ne6 {[%emt 0:00:33]} Nxe3 {[%emt 0:03:17]} 33. Kxe3 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Rg8 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 34. Ke4 { [%emt 0:01:45]} c6 {[%emt 0:05:25]} 35. Kf5 {[%emt 0:00:08]} Be7 {[%emt 0:00: 06]} 36. Ng5 {[%emt 0:00:13]} Re8 {[%emt 0:02:20]} (36... Bxg5 37. hxg5+ Kg7 38. Rh6) 37. Ne4 {[%emt 0:00:53]} Kg7 {[%emt 0:00:53]} 38. Ke6 {[%emt 0:00:13]} Bf8+ {[%emt 0:02:14]} (38... Bxh4+ 39. Kxd6 $18) 39. Kd7 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Re7+ {[%emt 0:00:03]} 40. Kxd6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Kf7 {[%emt 0:04:42]} 41. Rg1 { [%emt 0:07:01]} cxd5 {[%emt 0:04:56]} 42. cxd5 {[%emt 0:00:39]} Ke8 {[%emt 0: 00:59]} 43. Nf6+ {[%emt 0:00:09]} Kd8 {[%emt 0:00:55]} 44. Rg8 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Re8+ {[%emt 0:00:31]} 45. Rxf8 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Rxf8 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 46. Ke6 { [%emt 0:00:05]} Rh8 {[%emt 0:05:23]} 47. h5 {[%emt 0:00:08]} b5 {[%emt 0:00:10] } 48. d6 {[%emt 0:00:14]} 1-0 [Event "80th Tata Steel Masters 2018"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.16"] [Round "4"] [White "Hou, Yifan"] [Black "Matlakov, Maxim"] [Result "0-1"] [WhiteElo "2680"] [BlackElo "2718"] [Annotator "ChessBase"] [PlyCount "108"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} e5 {[%emt 0:00:10]} 2. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nc6 { [%emt 0:00:06]} 3. Bb5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} a6 {[%emt 0:00:16]} 4. Ba4 {[%emt 0:00: 00]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:10]} 5. O-O {[%emt 0:00:01]} Be7 {[%emt 0:00:08]} 6. Re1 { [%emt 0:00:08]} b5 {[%emt 0:00:29]} 7. Bb3 {[%emt 0:00:06]} O-O {[%emt 0:00:06] } 8. c3 {[%emt 0:00:31]} d5 {[%emt 0:00:17]} 9. d4 {[%emt 0:03:04]} exd4 { [%emt 0:00:59]} 10. e5 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Ne4 {[%emt 0:00:15]} 11. cxd4 {[%emt 0: 00:05]} Bf5 {[%emt 0:00:15]} 12. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:15]} Nxc3 {[%emt 0:00:56]} 13. bxc3 {[%emt 0:00:07]} Na5 {[%emt 0:00:16]} 14. Bc2 {[%emt 0:00:19]} Bxc2 { [%emt 0:00:43]} 15. Qxc2 {[%emt 0:00:07]} Nc4 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 16. a4 {[%emt 0: 06:00]} Qd7 {[%emt 0:26:38]} 17. Bg5 {[%emt 0:09:13]} bxa4 {[%emt 0:05:09]} 18. Rxa4 {[%emt 0:27:34]} a5 {[%emt 0:14:54]} 19. Rea1 {[%emt 0:06:08]} Rfb8 { [%emt 0:03:07]} 20. R4a2 {[%emt 0:11:27]} Bxg5 {[%emt 0:13:29]} 21. Nxg5 { [%emt 0:00:07]} g6 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 22. h3 {[%emt 0:05:42]} Rb6 {[%emt 0:05:10] } 23. Nf3 {[%emt 0:02:06]} Rab8 {[%emt 0:01:54]} 24. Qc1 {[%emt 0:08:02]} Kg7 { [%emt 0:17:45]} 25. Kh2 {[%emt 0:11:35]} Qf5 {[%emt 0:01:50]} 26. Nd2 {[%emt 0: 08:21]} Nb2 {[%emt 0:08:02]} 27. Nf3 {[%emt 0:03:34]} a4 {[%emt 0:01:27]} 28. Rxa4 {[%emt 0:03:08]} Nxa4 {[%emt 0:00:44]} 29. Rxa4 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Rb2 { [%emt 0:01:22]} 30. Qe3 {[%emt 0:02:43]} Qe4 {[%emt 0:03:52]} 31. Qxe4 { [%emt 0:03:14]} dxe4 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 32. Ng5 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Rxf2 {[%emt 0: 00:29]} 33. Nxe4 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Re2 {[%emt 0:00:11]} 34. Nf6 {[%emt 0:01:59]} Rbb2 {[%emt 0:01:09]} 35. Kg3 {[%emt 0:00:11]} Re3+ {[%emt 0:01:58]} 36. Kf4 { [%emt 0:00:24]} Rxc3 {[%emt 0:00:46]} 37. Ra8 {[%emt 0:00:32]} Rxg2 {[%emt 0: 03:01]} 38. Rg8+ {[%emt 0:00:15]} Kh6 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 39. Rh8 {[%emt 0:00:50]} Rf2+ {[%emt 0:00:22]} 40. Ke4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Rxf6 {[%emt 0:00:29]} (40... g5 41. Rxh7+ (41. Ng4+ Kg7 42. Nxf2 Kxh8 43. d5 Kg7 $19) 41... Kg6 42. Rh8 Rxf6 43. exf6 Kxf6) 41. exf6 {[%emt 0:00:55]} Kg5 {[%emt 0:23:29]} 42. Rxh7 { [%emt 0:00:09]} Kxf6 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 43. Rh8 {[%emt 0:14:40]} (43. h4 c5 44. dxc5 (44. d5 Rc4+ 45. Kf3 Rd4) 44... Rxc5 45. Rh8 Rh5 46. Rxh5 gxh5 47. Kf4 Ke6 48. Kg5 (48. Ke4 f5+ 49. Kd4 (49. Kf4 Kf6) 49... Kd6 $19) 48... f5 49. Kxh5 Kf6 50. Kh6 f4 $19) 43... Kg5 {[%emt 0:03:23]} 44. h4+ {[%emt 0:17:52]} Kg4 { [%emt 0:01:07]} 45. d5 {[%emt 0:01:21]} Rc4+ {[%emt 0:10:41]} (45... f5+ 46. Kd4 Rh3 47. Rh7 Rxh4 48. Rxc7 f4 49. Ke4 Rh8 50. d6 g5 51. d7 Rd8) 46. Ke5 { [%emt 0:01:34]} (46. Kd3 $1 Rc1 (46... Rf4) 47. Rh7 f5 48. Rg7 Kxh4 49. Rxg6) 46... f5 {[%emt 0:00:50]} 47. h5 {[%emt 0:17:17]} (47. Rh6 f4 48. Rxg6+ Kxh4) 47... Re4+ {[%emt 0:04:37]} 48. Kf6 {[%emt 0:00:01]} gxh5 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 49. Rc8 {[%emt 0:00:03]} f4 {[%emt 0:00:37]} 50. Rxc7 {[%emt 0:00:19]} f3 {[%emt 0: 00:24]} 51. Rg7+ {[%emt 0:00:43]} Kf4 {[%emt 0:02:44]} 52. Rh7 {[%emt 0:01:08]} f2 {[%emt 0:01:30]} 53. Rxh5 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Kg3 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 54. Rg5+ { [%emt 0:01:29]} Rg4 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 0-1 [Event "80th Tata Steel Masters 2018"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.16"] [Round "4"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "So, Wesley"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2811"] [BlackElo "2792"] [Annotator "ChessBase"] [PlyCount "96"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. d4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:30]} 2. c4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} e6 {[%emt 0: 00:07]} 3. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Bb4 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 4. e3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} O-O {[%emt 0:04:31]} 5. Nge2 {[%emt 0:00:02]} d5 {[%emt 0:05:27]} 6. a3 {[%emt 0: 00:14]} Be7 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 7. cxd5 {[%emt 0:00:08]} exd5 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 8. Nf4 {[%emt 0:00:08]} Re8 {[%emt 0:05:14]} 9. Bd3 {[%emt 0:00:59]} Bd6 {[%emt 0: 03:31]} 10. O-O {[%emt 0:01:27]} Bxf4 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 11. exf4 {[%emt 0:00:06] } Nc6 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 12. Be3 {[%emt 0:00:47]} Ne7 {[%emt 0:00:08]} 13. Qc2 { [%emt 0:12:07]} g6 {[%emt 0:00:51]} 14. f3 {[%emt 0:00:15]} Bf5 {[%emt 0:01:41] } (14... h5 15. Qd2 Bf5 16. Be2 Qd7 17. Rfe1 Be6 18. Bf2 Nf5 19. Bd3 Nd6 20. Re5 c6 21. Rae1 Bf5 22. Bh4 Nh7 23. Be7 Bxd3 24. Bxd6 Bf5 25. Bb4 b6 26. a4 a5 27. Ba3 Re6 28. h3 Rae8 29. g4 Rxe5 30. fxe5 hxg4 31. hxg4 Bxg4 32. fxg4 Qxg4+ 33. Kf1 Ng5 34. Qg2 Qf5+ 35. Qf2 Nf3 36. Ke2 Nxe1 37. Qxf5 gxf5 38. Kxe1 f6 39. Bd6 Kf7 40. Ne2 fxe5 41. dxe5 Ke6 42. Kf2 Kd7 43. Nf4 Rg8 44. Ba3 Re8 45. Bd6 Rg8 46. Ba3 Re8 47. Bd6 {½-½ (47) So,W (2770)-Karjakin,S (2773) Bilbao 2016 CBM 174 [Krasenkow,M]}) 15. g4 {[%emt 0:05:46]} Bxd3 {[%emt 0:17:41]} 16. Qxd3 {[%emt 0:00:10]} Kg7 {[%emt 0:04:14]} (16... Qd6 17. Rae1 h5 18. h3 hxg4 19. hxg4 Kg7 20. Kg2 a6 21. Qd2 Nd7 22. Bf2 Nf8 23. Re5 f6 24. f5 gxf5 25. Bg3 Qc6 26. Re2 Nfg6 27. Rh1 Rh8 28. Rhe1 Kf7 29. Nd1 Rae8 30. Nf2 Qd7 31. g5 f4 32. Ng4 fxg3 33. gxf6 Nf5 34. Kg1 Rxe2 35. Rxe2 Re8 36. Ne5+ Nxe5 37. dxe5 Ke6 { 0-1 (37) El Debs,F (2527)-Quesada Perez,Y (2645) Montevideo 2015}) 17. Rae1 { [%emt 0:04:17]} Qd7 {[%emt 0:04:01]} 18. Bf2 {[%emt 0:14:03]} h5 {[%emt 0:02: 54]} 19. h3 {[%emt 0:00:42]} c6 {[%emt 0:08:18]} 20. Ne2 {[%emt 0:15:06]} hxg4 {[%emt 0:10:33]} 21. hxg4 {[%emt 0:00:15]} Nfg8 {[%emt 0:08:42]} 22. Bh4 { [%emt 0:10:46]} f5 {[%emt 0:02:13]} 23. Ng3 {[%emt 0:02:09]} Rf8 {[%emt 0:08: 42]} 24. Re5 {[%emt 0:02:02]} (24. Qe2 Qc7 25. Bg5 Rae8 26. Qh2) 24... Rf7 { [%emt 0:03:11]} 25. Qe2 {[%emt 0:07:07]} Kf8 {[%emt 0:01:51]} 26. Re6 {[%emt 0: 10:36]} (26. Re1 c5 27. Bxe7+ Nxe7 28. Qh2 Kg8 29. Qh6 fxg4 30. Nh5 Re8 31. Rg5 Qa4 32. Rxe7 Qxd4+ 33. Kg2 gxf3+ 34. Kh3 $18) 26... Rc8 {[%emt 0:06:49]} 27. b4 {[%emt 0:06:07]} (27. Qe5 $1 c5 28. Rd6 Qc7 29. Bxe7+ Qxe7 (29... Nxe7 30. Qh8+ Ng8 31. Rxg6) 30. Rxg6) 27... b6 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 28. Re1 {[%emt 0:01:51]} c5 { [%emt 0:00:20]} 29. bxc5 {[%emt 0:00:41]} bxc5 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 30. dxc5 { [%emt 0:00:06]} (30. gxf5 gxf5 31. dxc5 Rxc5 32. Nxf5 Rxf5 (32... Nxf5 33. Re8+ Kg7 34. Qg2+ Kh6 35. Qg5+ Kh7 36. Qxg8+) 33. Bxe7+ Nxe7 34. Rxe7) 30... Qc7 { [%emt 0:01:33]} (30... Rxc5 31. gxf5 Nxf5 32. Nxf5 Rxf5 33. Be7+ Nxe7 34. Rxe7) 31. Kg2 {[%emt 0:09:11]} Qxc5 {[%emt 0:02:24]} 32. Qe5 {[%emt 0:00:22]} fxg4 { [%emt 0:01:57]} 33. fxg4 {[%emt 0:00:05]} d4 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 34. Qxc5 { [%emt 0:05:33]} (34. Qh8 $1 Nd5 35. Kh2 Nxf4 36. Be7+ Rxe7 37. Rxe7 Qxe7 38. Rxe7 Kxe7 39. Qg7+ Ke6 40. Ne4 $18) 34... Rxc5 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 35. Ne4 { [%emt 0:01:59]} Rc2+ {[%emt 0:00:12]} 36. Kf3 {[%emt 0:00:33]} Nd5 {[%emt 0:03: 35]} 37. Bg5 {[%emt 0:00:09]} (37. Rd6 $1 Nxf4 38. Ng5 Nd3+ 39. Kg3 Nxe1 (39... Kg7 40. Ne6+ Kh7 41. Rb1 $18) 40. Ne6+ Ke8 41. Rd8#) 37... Rh7 {[%emt 0:04:45]} 38. Nd6 {[%emt 0:01:04]} d3 {[%emt 0:00:49]} 39. f5 {[%emt 0:01:30]} Rh3+ { [%emt 0:02:02]} 40. Ke4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} d2 {[%emt 0:00:24]} (40... Nc7 41. Rf1 ) 41. Rf1 {[%emt 0:13:51]} (41. Rd1 gxf5+ 42. Kxd5 Rd3+ 43. Ke5 Rc5+ 44. Kf4 Rc1 45. Rxd2 Rxd2 46. Kxf5 Rf1+ 47. Kg6 Re1 48. Rxe1 Rxd6+ 49. Kf5 Kf7 50. Re5 $16) 41... d1=Q {[%emt 0:24:26]} 42. Rxd1 {[%emt 0:01:25]} Nc3+ {[%emt 0:00:15] } 43. Kd4 {[%emt 0:00:25]} Nxd1 {[%emt 0:00:18]} 44. f6 {[%emt 0:12:46]} Nxf6 { [%emt 0:00:31]} 45. Bxf6 {[%emt 0:00:30]} Rd2+ {[%emt 0:00:18]} 46. Kc5 { [%emt 0:00:05]} Rc2+ {[%emt 0:08:05]} 47. Kd4 {[%emt 0:03:48]} Rd2+ {[%emt 0: 00:09]} 48. Kc5 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Rc2+ {[%emt 0:00:03]} 1/2-1/2 [Event "80th Tata Steel Masters 2018"] [Site "Hilversum"] [Date "2018.01.17"] [Round "5"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D30"] [WhiteElo "2804"] [BlackElo "2811"] [Annotator "Simon"] [PlyCount "85"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. d4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:09]} (1... d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 (3. Nc3 Nf6 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bg5) 3... Nf6) 2. c4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} e6 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 3. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} d5 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 4. Bg5 {[%emt 0:00:18]} Bb4+ { [%emt 0:01:00]} 5. Nbd2 {[%emt 0:00:27] Side Line} (5. Nc3) 5... dxc4 {[%emt 0: 00:29]} (5... O-O 6. a3 Bxd2+ 7. Qxd2) 6. e3 {[%emt 0:00:05] D30: Queen's Gambit Declined: Systems without Nc3} b5 {[%emt 0:00:39]} 7. Be2 {[%emt 0:00: 05]} (7. a4 c6 8. Be2 Nbd7 9. O-O Qb6 10. Qc2 Bb7 11. b3 c3 12. Nb1 c5 13. Nxc3 cxd4 14. Nxb5 Rc8 15. Qb2 a6 16. a5 Qc5 17. exd4 Qf5 18. Bd2 Be7 19. Nc3 O-O 20. Nh4 {1-0 (20) Mamedyarov,S (2800)-Inarkiev,E (2707) Geneve 2017}) 7... Bb7 {[%emt 0:06:59]} 8. O-O {[%emt 0:00:09]} O-O {[%emt 0:01:31]} 9. b3 {[%emt 0: 00:21]} c3 {[%emt 0:16:19]} (9... cxb3 10. Qxb3 Be7 11. Qxb5 (11. Bxb5 c5) 11... Ba6) 10. a3 $146 {[%emt 0:00:27]} ({Predecessor:} 10. Nb1 h6 11. Bh4 g5 12. Bg3 Qd5 13. Qc2 Ne4 {½-½ (27) Aker,C-Wall,W corr 1983}) 10... Be7 { [%emt 0:03:10]} (10... cxd2 11. axb4) 11. Nb1 {[%emt 0:00:12]} c5 {[%emt 0:03: 10]} (11... b4 12. axb4 Bxb4 13. Qc2) 12. Nxc3 {[%emt 0:00:30]} a6 {[%emt 0:01: 01]} 13. dxc5 {[%emt 0:00:30]} Bxc5 $11 {[%emt 0:00:34]} 14. Qc2 {[%emt 0:17: 14]} Nbd7 {[%emt 0:03:17]} 15. Rfd1 {[%emt 0:01:03]} Rc8 {[%emt 0:04:31]} ( 15... Be7) 16. Bxf6 {[%emt 0:12:45]} gxf6 {[%emt 0:00:16]} 17. b4 {[%emt 0:00: 42]} Be7 {[%emt 0:01:43]} 18. Rac1 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Qe8 {[%emt 0:05:47]} (18... Rc7 $5) 19. Qb1 {[%emt 0:22:26]} Nb6 {[%emt 0:16:41]} 20. Nd4 {[%emt 0:05:42]} Kh8 {[%emt 0:05:05]} 21. Bf3 {[%emt 0:09:20]} Bxf3 {[%emt 0:00:11]} 22. Nxf3 { [%emt 0:00:04]} ({Don't play} 22. gxf3 Rg8+ 23. Kh1 f5 $15) 22... Nc4 {[%emt 0: 01:10]} 23. Ne4 {[%emt 0:07:36]} Qc6 {[%emt 0:05:24]} (23... Nxa3 24. Qa1 Nc2 25. Qb2 Nxb4 26. Nxf6) 24. Nfd2 {[%emt 0:01:47]} Qb7 $2 {[%emt 0:13:45]} (24... Rfd8 25. Nxc4 Rxd1+ 26. Rxd1 Qxc4) 25. Nxc4 {[%emt 0:00:26]} Rxc4 {[%emt 0:03: 06]} 26. Rxc4 $40 {[%emt 0:01:29] White attacks.} bxc4 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 27. Qc2 {[%emt 0:00:17]} Rc8 {[%emt 0:02:23]} 28. h3 {[%emt 0:05:58]} Qc6 {[%emt 0:04: 20]} (28... a5) 29. Rd4 $1 {[%emt 0:03:32]} a5 {[%emt 0:07:03]} (29... e5 30. Rd1) 30. Nd2 $1 {[%emt 0:04:11]} ({Much worse is} 30. bxa5 $6 c3 $11) 30... Rg8 {[%emt 0:03:45] [#]} 31. g3 $1 {[%emt 0:01:17]} axb4 {[%emt 0:00:19]} 32. Rxc4 {[%emt 0:00:47]} b3 {[%emt 0:01:41]} (32... Qb5 $16) 33. Nxb3 $18 {[%emt 0:02: 07]} ({Not} 33. Rxc6 bxc2 34. a4 Ra8 $14) 33... Qf3 {[%emt 0:00:26]} (33... Qa8 $142 34. Rh4 Rg7) 34. a4 {[%emt 0:01:21]} Bd6 {[%emt 0:00:24] Threatening ... Bxg3.} 35. Rc8 {[%emt 0:04:04]} Rxc8 {[%emt 0:00:04]} (35... Bxg3 36. Rxg8+ Kxg8 37. fxg3 Qxg3+ 38. Qg2) 36. Qxc8+ {[%emt 0:00:02]} Kg7 {[%emt 0:00:04] ... Qd1+ is the strong threat.} 37. Qc2 {[%emt 0:01:22]} Bb4 $2 {[%emt 0:00:48] [#] } (37... Qd5 {was necessary.} 38. Nd4 Bc5) 38. Qc4 $1 {[%emt 0:00:58]} Qb7 { [%emt 0:01:04]} 39. a5 {[%emt 0:00:31] White is clearly winning.} Bd6 {[%emt 0: 00:41]} 40. a6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Qb6 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 41. Nd4 {[%emt 0:03:11]} Qa5 {[%emt 0:03:58]} 42. Kg2 {[%emt 0:01:35]} Qa3 {[%emt 0:00:57]} 43. Qc6 { [%emt 0:00:51] Precision: White = 78%, Black = 40%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "80th Tata Steel Masters 2018"] [Site "Hilversum"] [Date "2018.01.17"] [Round "5"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Result "*"] [WhiteElo "2834"] [BlackElo "2787"] [Annotator "Simon"] [PlyCount "126"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} e5 {[%emt 0:00:09]} 2. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nc6 { [%emt 0:00:05]} 3. Bc4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Bc5 {[%emt 0:00:16]} 4. O-O {[%emt 0: 00:01]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:22]} 5. d3 {[%emt 0:00:07]} d6 {[%emt 0:01:10]} 6. c3 { [%emt 0:00:19]} a6 {[%emt 0:00:11]} 7. a4 {[%emt 0:00:17]} O-O {[%emt 0:01:12]} 8. h3 {[%emt 0:00:18] C54: Giuoco Piano: 4 c3 Nf6, main lines with 5 d4 and 5 d3} h6 {[%emt 0:02:17]} 9. Re1 {[%emt 0:02:41]} Re8 {[%emt 0:00:58]} 10. Nbd2 { [%emt 0:03:42]} Be6 {[%emt 0:01:14]} 11. Bxe6 {[%emt 0:01:26]} Rxe6 {[%emt 0: 00:25]} 12. b4 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Ba7 {[%emt 0:00:04] LiveBook: 38 Games} 13. Qc2 {[%emt 0:06:43]} Qd7 {[%emt 0:00:13]} 14. Nf1 {[%emt 0:06:09]} d5 {[%emt 0:01: 00]} 15. Ng3 {[%emt 0:14:26]} Rd8 {[%emt 0:04:39] [#]} 16. exd5 $146 {[%emt 0: 16:32]} Qxd5 {[%emt 0:14:05]} 17. Be3 {[%emt 0:00:09]} Qxd3 {[%emt 0:19:40]} 18. Qxd3 {[%emt 0:00:07]} Rxd3 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 19. Bxa7 {[%emt 0:09:11]} Nxa7 {[%emt 0:01:24]} 20. Nxe5 {[%emt 0:00:04]} Rd5 {[%emt 0:02:26]} 21. Ng4 { [%emt 0:00:20]} Nxg4 {[%emt 0:06:14]} 22. Rxe6 {[%emt 0:00:04]} fxe6 {[%emt 0: 00:09]} 23. hxg4 $11 {[%emt 0:00:04] Endgame KRN-KRN} a5 {[%emt 0:01:58]} 24. f3 {[%emt 0:02:26]} Nc6 {[%emt 0:07:20]} 25. Rb1 {[%emt 0:07:16]} b6 {[%emt 0: 08:27]} 26. Ne4 {[%emt 0:00:46]} axb4 {[%emt 0:04:39]} 27. cxb4 {[%emt 0:00:12] } Rd4 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 28. b5 {[%emt 0:01:15]} Ne5 {[%emt 0:01:27]} 29. Rc1 { [%emt 0:11:02]} Nxg4 {[%emt 0:07:22]} 30. fxg4 {[%emt 0:02:50]} Rxe4 {[%emt 0: 00:35]} 31. Rxc7 {[%emt 0:00:09]} Rxa4 {[%emt 0:02:44] And now ...Rb4 would win. KR-KR} 32. Rc6 {[%emt 0:02:10]} Kf7 {[%emt 0:02:36]} 33. g5 {[%emt 0:01: 35]} hxg5 {[%emt 0:00:22]} 34. Rxb6 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Rb4 {[%emt 0:01:28]} 35. Rb8 {[%emt 0:04:45]} Kf6 {[%emt 0:04:54]} 36. b6 {[%emt 0:00:21]} Ke5 {[%emt 0: 02:25]} 37. Kh2 {[%emt 0:09:23]} Rb3 {[%emt 0:00:59]} 38. g4 {[%emt 0:08:53] [#]} (38. Kg1 $11 Kf4 39. Rf8+ Kg3 40. Rf3+) 38... Kf4 $1 $17 {[%emt 0:07:48]} 39. b7 {[%emt 0:00:04] Strongly threatening Rf8+.} Kxg4 {[%emt 0:02:10] aiming for ...Rb2+.} 40. Re8 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Rxb7 {[%emt 0:01:14]} 41. Rxe6 {[%emt 0: 01:39]} Rb2+ {[%emt 0:08:12]} 42. Kg1 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Kf3 {[%emt 0:02:35] White must now prevent ...g4.} 43. Ra6 {[%emt 0:00:44]} (43. Rg6 g4 44. Rxg7 Kg3 45. Kf1 Rb1+ 46. Ke2 Kh3) 43... Rg2+ {[%emt 0:04:59]} 44. Kh1 {[%emt 0:00: 52] [#] Hoping for Ra3+.} Re2 {[%emt 0:02:48]} 45. Kg1 {[%emt 0:08:27]} (45. Ra3+ Re3 46. Rxe3+ Kxe3 47. Kg2 Kf4 48. Kf2 Kg4 49. Kg2 g6 50. Kh2 Kf3) 45... g4 {[%emt 0:02:28]} 46. Ra1 {[%emt 0:01:24]} Re8 {[%emt 0:08:00]} 47. Rb1 { [%emt 0:03:54]} g3 {[%emt 0:09:01]} 48. Rb3+ $1 {[%emt 0:00:40]} Re3 {[%emt 0: 03:29]} 49. Rb1 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Re8 {[%emt 0:04:24]} 50. Rb3+ $1 {[%emt 0:00: 05]} Kg4 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 51. Rb5 {[%emt 0:00:11]} Re1+ {[%emt 0:05:22]} 52. Kg2 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Re2+ {[%emt 0:00:18]} 53. Kg1 {[%emt 0:00:02]} g5 { [%emt 0:05:15]} 54. Rb8 $17 {[%emt 0:00:12]} Re1+ {[%emt 0:00:24]} (54... Re7 $17) 55. Kg2 $11 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Re2+ {[%emt 0:00:04]} (55... Re3 $11) 56. Kg1 $17 {[%emt 0:00:10]} Ra2 {[%emt 0:00:42]} 57. Rc8 {[%emt 0:00:10]} Ra1+ { [%emt 0:01:28]} ({Black should play} 57... Rd2 $17 58. Rb8 Kf3 (58... Kh3 59. Rh8+) 59. Rb4) 58. Kg2 {[%emt 0:00:02]} Ra2+ {[%emt 0:00:04]} ({Better is} 58... Ra3 $11) 59. Kg1 {[%emt 0:00:07]} g2 {[%emt 0:02:18]} 60. Rc4+ {[%emt 0: 00:00] The position is equal.} Kh3 {[%emt 0:00:53] ( -> ...Ra1+)} 61. Rc3+ { [%emt 0:00:18]} Kh4 {[%emt 0:00:09]} 62. Rc4+ $1 {[%emt 0:00:08]} g4 {[%emt 0: 00:35] next ...Ra1+ is good for Black.} 63. Rc3 {[%emt 0:00:04]} Kh5 { Precision: White = 70%, Black = 49%.} * [Event "80th Tata Steel Masters 2018"] [Site "Hilversum"] [Date "2018.01.17"] [Round "5"] [White "So, Wesley"] [Black "Adhiban, B."] [Result "*"] [WhiteElo "2792"] [BlackElo "2655"] [Annotator "Simon"] [PlyCount "144"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} d6 {[%emt 0:01:26]} 2. Nc3 {[%emt 0:01:28]} e5 {[%emt 0: 00:35]} 3. g3 {[%emt 0:02:38]} Be7 {[%emt 0:00:56]} 4. Bg2 {[%emt 0:03:23]} f5 {[%emt 0:00:11]} 5. d4 {[%emt 0:08:27]} (5. d3 Nf6 6. Nf3 O-O 7. O-O Qe8 8. Rb1 Qh5 9. b4 f4 10. b5 Bh3 11. a4 Ng4 12. a5 fxg3 13. hxg3 Bxg2 14. Kxg2 Rxf3) 5... Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:15]} (5... exd4 6. Qxd4 Nf6) (5... e4 6. Nh3) 6. dxe5 { [%emt 0:00:45]} dxe5 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 7. Qxd8+ {[%emt 0:00:03]} Bxd8 {[%emt 0: 00:04]} 8. b3 {[%emt 0:00:05]} O-O {[%emt 0:04:06]} 9. Bb2 {[%emt 0:05:28]} c6 {[%emt 0:00:21] LiveBook: 3 Partien} 10. Nf3 {[%emt 0:00:24]} (10. e4 Bb6) 10... Bc7 {[%emt 0:02:23]} (10... e4 11. Nd4) 11. O-O {[%emt 0:01:16]} Na6 { [%emt 0:02:04]} 12. Rfd1 {[%emt 0:10:47]} Re8 {[%emt 0:02:55]} 13. Rac1 { [%emt 0:01:52]} e4 {[%emt 0:00:40]} 14. Nd4 {[%emt 0:00:21]} f4 {[%emt 0:00:19] } 15. Ndb5 {[%emt 0:08:19]} (15. gxf4 $11 {remains equal.} Bxf4 (15... e3) 16. e3 Bc7) 15... fxg3 {[%emt 0:08:39]} (15... cxb5 $17 16. cxb5 Nc5 17. Nd5 Nxd5 18. Rxd5 (18. Rxc5 Ne3 (18... Be6 19. Rdxd5 Bxd5 20. Rxd5 (20. Rxc7 Bf7 21. Rxb7 Rad8 22. Rxa7)) 19. fxe3 Bb6) 18... b6 19. b4 Ne6 20. Bxe4 Bb7) 16. hxg3 { [%emt 0:01:20]} e3 {[%emt 0:32:51]} (16... cxb5 17. cxb5 Nc5 18. Nd5 Nxd5 19. Rxc5) (16... Bxg3 17. fxg3 cxb5 18. Nxb5) 17. f4 {[%emt 0:00:18]} Bg4 {[%emt 0: 01:08]} (17... cxb5 18. cxb5 Nc5 19. Nd5) 18. Nxc7 {[%emt 0:09:36]} (18. Nd6 Bxd6 19. Rxd6) 18... Nxc7 {[%emt 0:00:10]} 19. Ba3 {[%emt 0:00:08]} Ne6 { [%emt 0:04:13]} (19... Nh5 20. Kh2 Re6 21. Rd6) (19... Bf5) 20. Bd6 {[%emt 0: 11:51]} g5 {[%emt 0:07:30]} 21. fxg5 {[%emt 0:06:01]} Nxg5 {[%emt 0:00:05]} 22. Rd4 {[%emt 0:03:18]} Ne6 {[%emt 0:07:17]} 23. Rd3 $1 {[%emt 0:00:09]} Ng7 { [%emt 0:00:04]} 24. Rf1 {[%emt 0:02:57]} Nf5 {[%emt 0:00:22]} 25. Bf3 {[%emt 0: 00:36]} Bh3 {[%emt 0:01:49]} 26. Bg2 {[%emt 0:02:48]} Bg4 {[%emt 0:00:10]} 27. Rf4 {[%emt 0:01:03]} Re6 {[%emt 0:03:01]} 28. Bc7 {[%emt 0:05:55]} h5 {[%emt 0: 04:15]} 29. Bf3 {[%emt 0:01:14]} Ng7 {[%emt 0:08:03]} 30. Bd8 {[%emt 0:01:37]} Nge8 {[%emt 0:03:45]} 31. Kg2 {[%emt 0:05:40]} Bxf3+ {[%emt 0:00:30]} 32. Rxf3 {[%emt 0:00:47]} (32. Kxf3) 32... Ng4 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 33. Rf5 {[%emt 0:03:27]} (33. Bg5) 33... Ng7 {[%emt 0:02:15]} 34. Rf4 {[%emt 0:02:34]} Rg6 {[%emt 0:01: 48]} 35. Bh4 {[%emt 0:00:59]} Ne6 {[%emt 0:00:53]} 36. Rf5 {[%emt 0:00:09]} Re8 {[%emt 0:05:24]} 37. Ne4 {[%emt 0:02:29]} ({Resist} 37. Rxh5 $6 Nf2 $11) 37... Ng7 {[%emt 0:04:20]} 38. Nf6+ {[%emt 0:04:09]} Nxf6 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 39. Rxf6 { [%emt 0:00:02]} Rxf6 {[%emt 0:02:42]} 40. Bxf6 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Nf5 {[%emt 0: 00:28]} 41. Kf3 {[%emt 0:05:49]} Kf7 {[%emt 0:02:53]} 42. Bg5 {[%emt 0:01:00]} Rg8 {[%emt 0:08:59]} 43. Bf4 {[%emt 0:00:09]} Ke6 {[%emt 0:04:11]} 44. Rd1 { [%emt 0:00:07]} b5 {[%emt 0:14:03] [#]} 45. cxb5 $1 {[%emt 0:07:46]} cxb5 { [%emt 0:00:03]} 46. Rh1 {[%emt 0:00:04]} Rh8 {[%emt 0:01:56]} 47. Bxe3 { [%emt 0:00:25]} Nxe3 {[%emt 0:00:36]} 48. Kxe3 {[%emt 0:00:09]} Kf5 {[%emt 0: 00:03]} 49. Rh4 {[%emt 0:09:49]} Re8+ {[%emt 0:00:07]} 50. Kf3 {[%emt 0:11:09]} Kg5 {[%emt 0:00:10]} 51. Rd4 {[%emt 0:00:18]} Rf8+ {[%emt 0:00:11]} 52. Rf4 { [%emt 0:00:39]} Rc8 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 53. Re4 {[%emt 0:01:40]} Rc3+ {[%emt 0:01: 04]} 54. e3 {[%emt 0:06:22]} Rc5 {[%emt 0:02:16]} 55. b4 {[%emt 0:02:36]} Rf5+ {[%emt 0:03:05]} 56. Rf4 {[%emt 0:00:03]} Rd5 {[%emt 0:00:47]} 57. Rf7 { [%emt 0:04:01]} a6 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 58. Rg7+ {[%emt 0:03:09]} Kh6 {[%emt 0:00: 09]} 59. Rc7 {[%emt 0:04:05]} Rd6 {[%emt 0:01:37]} 60. Rc5 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Rf6+ $1 {[%emt 0:00:21]} 61. Ke4 {[%emt 0:00:22]} Rg6 {[%emt 0:01:40]} 62. Kf3 {[%emt 0:01:42]} Rf6+ {[%emt 0:02:16]} 63. Kg2 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Rd6 {[%emt 0: 03:51]} 64. Kh3 {[%emt 0:01:06]} Re6 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 65. Rc3 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Kg5 {[%emt 0:00:43]} 66. a3 {[%emt 0:00:26]} Kg6 {[%emt 0:01:43]} (66... Re5 $1 $14) 67. g4 {[%emt 0:01:32]} hxg4+ {[%emt 0:10:41]} 68. Kxg4 {[%emt 0:00:01]} Kf6 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 69. Kf4 {[%emt 0:00:16]} Ke7 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 70. e4 $18 { [%emt 0:00:39]} Rh6 {[%emt 0:00:27]} 71. Rc7+ {[%emt 0:07:39]} Kd8 {[%emt 0:00: 10]} 72. Ra7 {[%emt 0:00:17]} Kc8 {[%emt 0:00:04]} * [Event "80th Tata Steel Masters 2018"] [Site "Hilversum"] [Date "2018.01.17"] [Round "5"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Hou, Yifan"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2768"] [BlackElo "2680"] [Annotator "Simon"] [PlyCount "85"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} e6 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 2. Nc3 {[%emt 0:00:00]} d5 {[%emt 0: 00:05]} 3. d4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} Bb4 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 4. Nf3 {[%emt 0:12:14]} Nf6 {[%emt 0:00:10]} 5. cxd5 {[%emt 0:00:10]} exd5 {[%emt 0:00:06]} 6. Bf4 { [%emt 0:00:05] D38: Queen's Gambit Declined: Ragozin Defence (4 Nf3 Bb4)} (6. Bg5 O-O 7. e3 Bf5 8. Qb3 Bxc3+ 9. Qxc3 h6 10. Bh4 g5 11. Bg3 Ne4 12. Qxc7 Nc6 13. Qxd8 Rfxd8 14. Be2 Rac8 15. O-O h5 16. h4 g4 17. Ne5 Nb4 18. Bf4 f6 19. Nd3 Nc3 20. bxc3 {½-½ (20) Ding,L (2774)-Aronian,L (2801) Palma de Mallorca 2017} ) 6... O-O {[%emt 0:06:26]} 7. Rc1 {[%emt 0:00:24]} c6 {[%emt 0:01:49]} 8. e3 { [%emt 0:00:46]} Bd6 $146 {[%emt 0:01:25]} ({Find the theoretical novelty and annotate with similar games:} 8... Bf5 9. Be2 Bd6 10. Bxd6 Qxd6 11. O-O Nbd7 12. a3 Ne4 13. Na4 Qe7 {1-0 (39) Melkumyan,H (2622)-Bluebaum,M (2588) Berlin 2015}) 9. Bxd6 {[%emt 0:16:13]} Qxd6 {[%emt 0:00:07]} 10. Qc2 {[%emt 0:00:06]} Re8 {[%emt 0:16:41]} 11. Bd3 {[%emt 0:08:02]} Nbd7 {[%emt 0:03:01]} 12. O-O { [%emt 0:03:33]} Nf8 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 13. h3 {[%emt 0:00:46]} g6 {[%emt 0:06:53] } 14. Ne5 {[%emt 0:05:26]} Nh5 {[%emt 0:14:30]} 15. Rfe1 {[%emt 0:10:51]} Re7 { [%emt 0:11:42]} 16. Qa4 {[%emt 0:08:22]} Nd7 {[%emt 0:14:24]} 17. Nf3 {[%emt 0: 05:41]} (17. Nxd7) 17... Ndf6 {[%emt 0:04:45]} 18. b4 {[%emt 0:01:38]} a6 { [%emt 0:01:12]} 19. b5 {[%emt 0:03:59]} cxb5 {[%emt 0:03:18] [#]} (19... Ng7 20. bxc6 bxc6) 20. Nxb5 $1 {[%emt 0:00:22]} Bd7 $2 {[%emt 0:02:39]} ({Better is } 20... Qd8 $14) (20... axb5 21. Qxa8) 21. Nxd6 $18 {[%emt 0:06:35]} Bxa4 { [%emt 0:00:06]} 22. Rb1 $2 {[%emt 0:00:12]} (22. Nc8 $18 {is more deadly.} Re6 (22... Re8 23. Nb6) 23. Ng5 Rc6 24. Ne7+) 22... b5 {[%emt 0:06:24]} 23. Ne5 $2 {[%emt 0:00:35]} (23. Rec1 $16) 23... Nd7 $1 $11 {[%emt 0:02:28]} 24. Rec1 { [%emt 0:04:51] Hoping for Nc8.} Nxe5 {[%emt 0:02:11]} 25. dxe5 {[%emt 0:00:38]} Rxe5 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 26. Rc7 {[%emt 0:00:51]} Rf8 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 27. Rc6 $36 {[%emt 0:13:38] White has good play.} Ra8 {[%emt 0:08:06]} 28. Rc7 {[%emt 0:01: 57]} Rf8 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 29. Rc6 {[%emt 0:00:05]} Ra8 {[%emt 0:00:03]} 30. Rbc1 {[%emt 0:02:41]} d4 {[%emt 0:02:58] [#]} (30... Re6 $1 $11 {remains equal. } 31. Rc7 (31. Nc8 Rxc6) 31... Rxd6) 31. g4 $1 $16 {[%emt 0:00:35] White has strong compensation.} ({Much worse is} 31. exd4 $6 Rd5 $11) 31... Nf6 {[%emt 0: 02:42]} 32. e4 {[%emt 0:01:05]} Re6 {[%emt 0:00:11] [#]} (32... Ne8 $1 $11 { keeps the balance.}) 33. f4 {[%emt 0:01:21]} (33. Rc8+ $1 $16 Rxc8 34. Rxc8+ Kg7 35. g5) 33... b4 {[%emt 0:01:32]} ({Black should try} 33... Ne8 $11 34. Nxe8 Rexe8) 34. Rc8+ {[%emt 0:02:16]} Rxc8 {[%emt 0:00:01]} 35. Rxc8+ {[%emt 0: 00:05]} Kg7 {[%emt 0:00:02]} 36. e5 {[%emt 0:01:00] aiming for Bc4.} Nd5 { [%emt 0:00:02]} 37. Bc4 {[%emt 0:00:18]} Nxf4 {[%emt 0:01:35]} 38. Rc7 { [%emt 0:00:33]} d3 $2 {[%emt 0:00:54]} (38... Nxh3+ $11 39. Kg2 Rxe5 40. Kxh3 d3 41. Rxf7+ Kh6) 39. Rxf7+ $18 {[%emt 0:00:19]} Kh6 {[%emt 0:00:18] And now .. .Rxd6! would win.} 40. Rxf4 {[%emt 0:00:00]} d2 {[%emt 0:00:04]} 41. Rd4 { [%emt 0:00:25] Precision: White = 45%, Black = 44%.} d1=Q+ 42. Rxd1 Bxd1 43. Bxe6 1-0 [Event "80th Tata Steel GpA"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Date "2018.01.16"] [Round "4.1"] [White "Giri, Anish"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C19"] [WhiteElo "2752"] [BlackElo "2834"] [PlyCount "61"] [EventDate "2018.01.13"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 Ne7 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 c5 7. Qg4 cxd4 8. Qxg7 Rg8 9. Qxh7 Qc7 10. Ne2 Nbc6 11. f4 dxc3 12. Nxc3 (12. h4 Bd7 13. h5 O-O-O 14. Qd3 d4 15. h6 Be8 16. Rb1 Nd5 17. Nxd4 Nxf4 18. Bxf4 Rxd4 19. Qe3 f5 20. Bd3 Ra4 21. Rh3 {and White won a nice game in Sutovsky,E (2628)-Kovalenko,I (2684) Gibraltar 2017}) 12... Nd4 13. Bb2 Bd7 14. O-O-O Qb6 15. Qd3 Ndf5 16. Rd2 $146 (16. Nb5 Rc8 17. g3 a6 18. Nd4 Ba4 19. Rd2 Rc4 20. Bg2 Nxd4 21. Bxd4 Qb5 22. Bf1 Qc6 {Svidler,P (2747)-Vitiugov,N (2712) Paris/St Petersburg 2013}) 16... Rc8 17. g3 Ne3 18. Ne4 $1 Rxc2+ $1 19. Rxc2 dxe4 20. Qxe4 Nxc2 21. Qxc2 Bc6 22. Bg2 Bxg2 23. Qxg2 Nd5 24. Kb1 Nc3+ 25. Ka1 Qb3 26. Bxc3 Qxa3+ 27. Kb1 Qxc3 28. Rc1 Qb4+ 29. Qb2 Qe4+ 30. Qc2 Qb4+ 31. Qb2 (31. Ka2 Kf8 32. Qc5+ Qxc5 33. Rxc5 Kg7 34. Rc7 Rb8) 1/2-1/2 [Event "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Date "2018.01.16"] [Round "4.3"] [White "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Black "Svidler, Peter"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D78"] [WhiteElo "2787"] [BlackElo "2768"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "47"] [EventDate "2018.01.13"] 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 d5 3. Bg2 g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. d4 O-O 6. c4 c6 7. Ne5 Be6 8. cxd5 Bxd5 9. Nc3 {"Kind of new and I got a certain advantage." (Kramnik)} Bxg2 10. Kxg2 Nbd7 ({The other way to play it is} 10... Na6 11. Nf3 c5 12. d5 b5 13. e4 b4 14. Ne2 c4 (14... Nxe4 $2 15. Qd3) 15. Qd4 Qb6 16. Qxc4 Rfc8 {with some compensation for the pawn in Wen,Y (2611)-Xu,M (2305) Wuxi 2016}) 11. Qb3 Qb6 12. Rd1 $146 {A logical novelty. In these positions both sides prefer that the opponent trades the queen himself.} ({Weaker was} 12. Qxb6 Nxb6 (12... axb6 $1) 13. Bg5 h6 14. Bxf6 Bxf6 15. Nf3 Rfd8 16. e3 {½-½ Denes,J (1912)-Znuderl,M Durham 2007}) 12... Qxb3 13. axb3 {"The endgame is unpleasant for Black." (Kramnik) These slight endgame advantages are Kramnik's bread and butter. Add to this the fact that lately Svidler hasn't been the patient defender that he was in the past, and you can call the opening a huge success for the 14th world champion.} Rfc8 ({It is not easy to liberate Black's position. For example:} 13... c5 14. Nxd7 Nxd7 15. dxc5 Nxc5 16. Be3 Rfc8 17. b4 Ne6 18. Rd7 {leads to large advantage for White.}) 14. f4 c5 {Svidler decided to "free himself tactically." (Kramnik)} ({More patient ways were also there, for example} 14... Nb8 {to bring the knight to b4, but White stays better after} 15. e4 Na6 16. Ra4) ({Or} 14... Nb6 15. e4 {with advantage for White as well.}) 15. Be3 cxd4 16. Rxd4 ({Significantly better than} 16. Bxd4 Nxe5 17. Bxe5 Ng4 $1) 16... Nxe5 17. fxe5 {White's pawn structure has been shattered, but piece activity is a priority in this endgame.} Ne8 18. Rd7 {The critical moment of the game.} Rc7 $2 {Svidler blunders.} ({Correct was} 18... Bxe5 $1 19. Rxe7 Bxc3 20. bxc3 Rxc3 21. Rxa7 {when the nice tactics} Rxe3 $1 22. Rxe3 Rxa7 23. Rxe8+ Kg7 24. Re7 {leads to an endgame which albeit unpleasant should be holdable for Black, even if he loses the b-pawn.}) ({Less convincing is} 18... Kf8 19. Rxb7 Bxe5 20. Raxa7 Rxa7 21. Bxa7 Bxc3 22. bxc3 Rxc3 23. b4 {when White preserves serious winning chances.}) 19. Rxa7 $1 {Svidler actually saw this, but missed an important detail in his preliminary calculations.} Rb8 ({ Svidler thought that he was save after} 19... Rxa7 20. Rd8 Kf8 ({But not} 20... Ra6 21. Rxe8+ Bf8 22. Bh6 {with inevitable mate.}) 21. Bxa7 Bxe5 {when suddenly the truth dawned on him:} 22. Bb8 $1 Rc5 23. b4 $1 {and White wins material, e.g.} Bc7 24. Rc8 Rc4 25. b5 $1 ({Less convincing is} 25. Nd5 Bxg3 26. Rxc4 Bxb8) 25... b6 ({Here} 25... Bxg3 26. Rxc4 Bxb8 27. Rc8 {leaves Black no chances.}) 26. Nd5 {and the bishop will be lost on the pin.}) 20. Rd5 { Kramnik not only won a pawn, but kept all his pieces dominating. More material gains will follow inevitably.} b6 ({The last chance was the endgame after} 20... e6 21. Rb5 b6 22. Rxb6 Rxb6 23. Rxc7 Nxc7 24. Bxb6 Bxe5) 21. Nb5 Rxa7 ({ The active} 21... Rc2 {will be strongly met with} 22. Nd4 Rxb2 23. Nc6 { suddenly trapping the rook!}) 22. Nxa7 Kf8 ({Or} 22... e6 23. Rd7) 23. Rd7 Ra8 (23... Bxe5 $2 24. Nc6) 24. Bd4 {Nothing can be done, White will gradually improve everything that he has before capturing the b6 pawn.} 1-0 [Event "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Date "2018.01.16"] [Round "4.6"] [White "Wei, Yi"] [Black "Jones, Gawain C B"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E71"] [WhiteElo "2743"] [BlackElo "2640"] [PlyCount "95"] [EventDate "2018.01.13"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. h3 O-O 6. Nf3 e5 7. d5 a5 8. Bg5 Na6 9. Be2 Qe8 10. g4 Kh8 11. Nd2 Ng8 12. h4 f5 13. gxf5 gxf5 14. Bh5 Qd7 15. Qe2 $146 (15. exf5 Qxf5 16. Nde4 Nc5 17. Qe2 Nxe4 18. Nxe4 Nf6 19. Ng3 Qd7 20. Rg1 c6 {Solomon,K (2350)-Popovic,D (2553) Cappelle-la-Grande 2014}) 15... Nf6 16. Bf3 fxe4 17. Ndxe4 Nxe4 18. Nxe4 Nb4 19. Bg2 Qa4 20. Nc3 Qc2 21. Be4 Qxe2+ 22. Kxe2 Bg4+ 23. f3 Bh5 24. Rag1 Rf7 25. Be3 Bf6 $2 ({After} 25... Raf8 26. Rh3 { White enjoys a pleasant advantage but the text move loses material.}) 26. Rg5 $1 Bg6 (26... Bxg5 27. hxg5 Bg6 28. Bxg6 {is a full piece.}) 27. Bxg6 hxg6 28. Rxg6 {Now it is White who has an extra pawn plus the compensation!} Nc2 29. Ne4 Be7 30. Ng5 Rf6 31. Rxf6 Bxf6 32. Ne6 Nxe3 33. Kxe3 Rg8 34. Ke4 c6 35. Kf5 Be7 36. Ng5 Re8 37. Ne4 Kg7 38. Ke6 Bf8+ 39. Kd7 Re7+ 40. Kxd6 Kf7 41. Rg1 cxd5 42. cxd5 Ke8 43. Nf6+ Kd8 44. Rg8 Re8+ 45. Rxf8 Rxf8 46. Ke6 Rh8 47. h5 b5 48. d6 1-0 [Event "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Date "2018.01.16"] [Round "4.6"] [White "Van Foreest, Lucas"] [Black "Amin, Bassem"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C58"] [WhiteElo "2481"] [BlackElo "2693"] [PlyCount "91"] [EventDate "2018.01.13"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Na5 6. Bb5+ c6 7. dxc6 bxc6 8. Qf3 Be7 9. Bd3 O-O (9... h6 10. Ne4 Nd5 11. Ng3 g6 12. O-O f5 13. Re1 Bf6 14. Bf1 O-O 15. d4 e4 16. Qd1 Bg7 17. Na3 Be6 {Pourramezanali,A (2505)-Wen,Y (2617) Bandar e Anzali 2017}) 10. Nc3 h6 11. Nge4 Nxe4 12. Qxe4 $146 (12. Bxe4 Qd7 13. g4 Qxg4 14. Qxg4 Bxg4 15. Rg1 f5 16. d3 Rab8 17. Bh1 Kh7 18. a3 c5 19. Nd5 Bd6 {Paveto,K (2424)-Della Morte,G (2421) Buenos Aires 2015}) 12... f5 13. Qxe5 Bd6 14. Qd4 Bb7 15. b4 c5 16. bxc5 Qe8+ 17. Kf1 Be5 18. Qb4 Qd8 19. c6 $2 ({ Better was} 19. Rb1 Rb8 20. Qa4 {because now} Bxc3 21. dxc3 Bxg2+ 22. Kxg2 Rxb1 23. h4 {is not something White has to be afraid of.}) 19... Bxc6 20. Ba3 Qg5 21. f3 Qxd2 22. Bb2 Rab8 23. Qc5 Rfe8 24. Rd1 Qg5 25. Bc1 Qh4 26. Ne2 Qh5 27. Qxa5 ({Strong was} 27. Bf4 $1) 27... Bxf3 $5 28. Qd2 f4 29. Bc4+ $6 Kh8 30. Bd5 $6 Bxd5 $6 ({Missing} 30... Bg4 $1 {and White is in trouble as ...f3 is coming. }) 31. Qxd5 f3 32. Ng3 Qh4 33. Kf2 Rbd8 34. Qxf3 Rf8 35. Rxd8 Qxd8 36. Nf5 g6 37. Rd1 Qc7 38. Kg1 Rxf5 39. Qe3 Bg7 40. Bb2 Rh5 41. h3 Kh7 42. Bxg7 Kxg7 $2 ( 42... Qxg7 {keeps the fight going a bit longer.}) 43. Qe8 Qc5+ 44. Kh1 Re5 45. Rd7+ Kf6 46. Rf7+ 1-0 [Event "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Date "2018.01.17"] [Round "5.5"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D30"] [WhiteElo "2804"] [BlackElo "2811"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "85"] [EventDate "2018.01.13"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Bg5 Bb4+ 5. Nbd2 {"I played risky and sacrificed a pawn on move five!" (Mamedyarov). This is not the first time that the Azeri GM choses a gambit in the QGD. In fact this line is one of his specialties.} dxc4 6. e3 b5 7. Be2 ({Last year, at one of the Grand Prix tournaments Mamedyarov won the following short game:} 7. a4 c6 8. Be2 Nbd7 9. O-O Qb6 10. Qc2 Bb7 11. b3 c3 12. Nb1 c5 13. Nxc3 cxd4 14. Nxb5 Rc8 15. Qb2 a6 16. a5 Qc5 17. exd4 Qf5 18. Bd2 Be7 19. Nc3 O-O 20. Nh4 {1-0 (20) Mamedyarov,S (2800)-Inarkiev,E (2707) Geneve 2017}) 7... Bb7 8. O-O O-O 9. b3 c3 10. a3 $146 {A natural move. White regains the pawn.} ({The only predecessor was a correspondense game which saw} 10. Nb1 h6 11. Bh4 g5 12. Bg3 Qd5 13. Qc2 Ne4 { with very a complex game in Aker,C-Wall,W corr 1983}) 10... Be7 11. Nb1 c5 { However Caruana can be also happy with his position as he can trade the strong central pawn of his opponent.} 12. Nxc3 a6 13. dxc5 Bxc5 14. Qc2 Nbd7 15. Rfd1 Rc8 {Black is OK with the doubled pawns.} ({There was nothing wrong with} 15... Qb6 16. b4 {as long as Black avoids} Be7 $2 ({But the preliminary} 16... Bd6 17. Qd2 Be7 {is equal.}) 17. Rxd7 $1) 16. Bxf6 gxf6 17. b4 Be7 18. Rac1 Qe8 ({ It made sense to go for} 18... f5 {at once. Apparently Caruana did not like the pin after} 19. Ne5 {but there was nothing to be afraid after} Rc7 {In fact White has to be careful as} 20. Bf3 $2 {allows the strong sacrifice} ({Instead } 20. Qb3 Bf6 {is equal}) 20... Nxe5 $1 21. Rxd8 Nxf3+ 22. gxf3 Rxd8 {Thanks to the pin along the c-file and the weaknesses on the white kingside it is Black who has the advantage. Say:} 23. Qe2 (23. Kg2 Bf6) 23... Rdc8 24. Qe1 Bf6 25. Ne2 Rxc1 26. Nxc1 Bxf3 {and Black is close to winning.}) 19. Qb1 Nb6 ({ Once again} 19... f5 {was the move to be made, and once again there were tactical issues due to} 20. Nxb5 {with the main idea} (20. Nd4 Bf6 {is equal instead.} ({Or} 20... Nb6)) 20... axb5 ({However, the sacrifice can be refuted with the intermezzo:} 20... Be4 $1 21. Qb2 ({Or} 21. Qa2 axb5 22. Bxb5 Rxc1 23. Rxc1 Bd5 $1 {with a tempo.}) 21... axb5 22. Bxb5 Bd5 23. Ne5 Bf6 { counter-pinning and winning.}) 21. Bxb5 Rxc1 22. Qxc1 Bd5 23. Ne5 {Even this looks good for Black after} Qb8 24. Nxd7 Qxb5 25. Nxf8 Bxf8) 20. Nd4 {White is ready to swap off the opponent's bishop pair.} Kh8 ({The third and the last time when Caruana could have comfortably developed the dark-squared bishop with } 20... f5) 21. Bf3 Bxf3 22. Nxf3 Nc4 23. Ne4 {Once again Mamedyarov sacrifices a pawn.} Qc6 ({Caruana correctly rejects the offer} 23... Nxa3 $2 24. Qa1 {would win for White-} Nc2 ({Or} 24... Nc4 25. Nxf6 Bxf6 26. Qxf6+ Kg8 27. Rd4) 25. Rxc2 Rxc2 26. Nxf6 Bxf6 27. Qxf6+ Kg8 28. Ne5 {with the decisive threat Ne5-g4-h6 mate.}) 24. Nfd2 Qb7 {A mistake. Now Black has to be very careful to maintain the balance.} ({The easiest was} 24... Rfd8 25. Nxc4 Rxd1+ 26. Rxd1 Qxc4 {allowing no weak pawns.} (26... bxc4 {is also possible though as this is a better version to the game continuation.})) ({Another equality is achieved with} 24... Nxd2 25. Nxd2 Qb7 26. Ne4 Rxc1 27. Rxc1 Rc8) 25. Nxc4 Rxc4 {Another inaccuracy.} ({Black also has many weaknesses after} 25... bxc4 26. Nd6 Bxd6 27. Rxd6 {but perhaps it is easier to defend without the light pieces on the board.}) 26. Rxc4 bxc4 27. Qc2 {The c4-pawn is more a liability than an asset. Combining threats on both sides of the board Mamedyarov skillfully increases pressure.} Rc8 28. h3 Qc6 ({If} 28... f5 29. Qc3+ ({Less promising is } 29. Nd6 Bxd6 30. Rxd6 c3 {when the passer becomes strong.}) 29... Kg8 30. Ng3 {looks strong for White, followed by Ng3-h5.}) 29. Rd4 {With the dual threat of 30.Ne4-d2 followed by Rd4-c4 and 30.Ne4-c5 followed by the same Rd4-c4 (this time with capture.)} a5 ({If} 29... f5 {White can choose either way of going for the pawn} 30. Nd2 ({Or} 30. Nc5 Bxc5 (30... Rg8 31. g3) 31. Rxc4) 30... c3 31. Rc4 Qxc4 32. Nxc4 Rxc4 33. Qd3 Rc7 34. Qd4+ Kg8 35. Qb6 Rd7 36. Qc6 {and White wins.}) 30. Nd2 Rg8 ({The other choice was the endgame with light pieces after} 30... Qb5 31. Rxc4 Rxc4 32. Qxc4 Qxc4 33. Nxc4 axb4 { However, it seems as Black is busted here as well-} 34. a4 Kg7 ({Or} 34... f5 35. a5 Bc5 36. Kf1 Kg7 37. Ke2 Kf6 38. Kd3 Ke7 39. a6 h5 (39... Kd7 40. Ne5+) 40. Ne5 {followed by Kd3-c4.}) 35. Kf1 Kf8 36. Ke2 Ke8 37. Kd3 Kd7 38. Kc2 Kc6 39. Kb3 Kb7 {Now after some preparation White breaks through with} 40. g4 Kc6 41. Nb2 Kb6 42. Nd3 Ka5 43. e4 Bf8 44. e5 $1) 31. g3 axb4 32. Rxc4 {White won a pawn and the game.} b3 ({Nothing is principally changed after} 32... Qd5 33. axb4 Rb8 34. Ne4 Kg7 35. Nc5) 33. Nxb3 Qf3 34. a4 Bd6 ({No perpetual after} 34... Rxg3+ 35. fxg3 Qxg3+ 36. Kf1) 35. Rc8 $1 ({Here White has to be careful as} 35. a5 {screams for the sacrifice} Bxg3 $1 36. fxg3 $2 ({Luckily for White he can survive after} 36. Rg4 $1 Rxg4 37. hxg4 Bd6 {but a draw is also half a point lost from the position he had before.}) 36... Rxg3+ 37. Kh2 Rxh3+ 38. Kg1 Rh1#) 35... Rxc8 36. Qxc8+ Kg7 37. Qc2 {The last prophylactical move.The rest is easy.} (37. a5 $4 Qd1+) 37... Bb4 38. Qc4 Qb7 39. a5 Bd6 40. a6 Qb6 41. Nd4 Qa5 42. Kg2 Qa3 43. Qc6 {Mamedyarov was certainly happy with a win against one of his rivals at the fortcoming Candidates' Tournament.} 1-0 [Event "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"] [Date "2018.01.17"] [Round "5.6"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Hou, Yifan"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D38"] [WhiteElo "2768"] [BlackElo "2680"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2018.01.13"] 1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 Bb4 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. cxd5 exd5 6. Bf4 (6. Bg5 O-O 7. e3 Bf5 8. Qb3 Bxc3+ 9. Qxc3 h6 10. Bh4 g5 11. Bg3 Ne4 12. Qxc7 Nc6 13. Qxd8 Rfxd8 14. Be2 Rac8 15. O-O h5 16. h4 g4 17. Ne5 Nb4 18. Bf4 f6 19. Nd3 Nc3 20. bxc3 { ½-½ Ding,L (2774)-Aronian,L (2801) Palma de Mallorca 2017}) 6... O-O 7. Rc1 c6 8. e3 Bd6 $146 (8... Bf5 9. Be2 Bd6 10. Bxd6 Qxd6 11. O-O Nbd7 12. a3 Ne4 13. Na4 Qe7 14. Qb3 Nd6 15. Nd2 Bg6 {Melkumyan,H (2622)-Bluebaum,M (2588) Berlin 2015}) 9. Bxd6 Qxd6 10. Qc2 Re8 11. Bd3 Nbd7 12. O-O Nf8 13. h3 g6 14. Ne5 Nh5 15. Rfe1 Re7 16. Qa4 Nd7 17. Nf3 Ndf6 18. b4 a6 19. b5 cxb5 20. Nxb5 Bd7 $2 (20... Qd8 {was necessary but after} 21. Nc3 Ng7 22. Qb3 Rb8 23. Ne5 { White is still better.}) 21. Nxd6 Bxa4 22. Rb1 $6 ({Of course} 22. Nc8 { (which also threatens 23.Nb6) was Svidler's first instinct but somehow he failed to see that after} Re6 {that rook can be attacked with} 23. Ng5 Rc6 24. Ne7+) ({In fact White can also do the same after the intermediate move} 22. g4) 22... b5 23. Ne5 (23. Rec1) 23... Nd7 24. Rec1 Nxe5 25. dxe5 Rxe5 26. Rc7 Rf8 27. Rc6 Ra8 28. Rc7 Rf8 29. Rc6 Ra8 30. Rbc1 d4 $6 {After getting fully back into the game, Hou slips again.} (30... Re6 {is about equal.}) 31. g4 Nf6 32. e4 ({Both players missed} 32. exd4 $1 Rd5 33. Rc8+ Rxc8 34. Rxc8+ Kg7 35. Rd8 $1 {and White keeps the pawn.}) 32... Re6 ({Here} 32... Ne8 $1 {might hold.}) 33. f4 b4 (33... Ne8 $1) 34. Rc8+ Rxc8 35. Rxc8+ Kg7 36. e5 Nd5 ({For the third time} 36... Ne8 {was good for almost equality.}) 37. Bc4 Nxf4 38. Rc7 d3 $2 ({Even here Black was still OK thanks to} 38... Nxh3+ 39. Kh2 Rxe5 40. Kxh3 d3) 39. Rxf7+ Kh6 40. Rxf4 d2 41. Rd4 1-0