Games
[Event "FIDE Candidates 2018"] [Site "Berlin GER"] [Date "2018.03.10"] [Round "1"] [White "Caruana, F."] [Black "So, W."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E00"] [WhiteElo "2784"] [BlackElo "2799"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "71"] [EventDate "2018.03.10"] 1. d4 {The first move came a surprise to So as "Fabiano played only 1.e4 at the previous Candidates."} Nf6 ({The two relevant game to the game opening are Caruana-Short (played five years ago) and Ding-So (from 2011) with the following move order:} 1... e6 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. c4 Bb4+ {They both saw} 4. Nbd2 { Caruana,F (2782)-Short,N (2683) London 2013: Ding,L (2654)-So,W (2658) Khanty-Mansiysk 2011}) 2. c4 e6 3. g3 Bb4+ {A surprise for the surprise. So usually chooses the QGD with 3...d5 or the Queen's Indian with 3...b6.} 4. Bd2 {This is a completely new position for both players, at least according to the Megabase.} Be7 5. Bg2 {Back into the Catalan type of positions.} d5 6. Nf3 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. Qb3 Nbd7 9. Bf4 a5 10. Rd1 ({Another option was} 10. Rc1 Ne4 11. Nc3 g5 12. Be3 Nd6 13. c5 Nc4 {as in Matsenko,S (2546)-Swiercz,D (2649) Columbus 2017}) 10... Nh5 $146 {A novelty in comparison to:} (10... b5 11. c5 Ba6 12. Qc2 b4 13. Bf1 Ne4 14. Nbd2 f5 15. Ne5 Nxe5 16. Bxe5 Nxd2 17. Qxd2 Bg5 {which Black held comfortably in Mamedyarov,S (2775) -Kovalenko,I (2644) Riga 2013}) 11. Bc1 Nhf6 {The idea itself is very standard. Black kicks the bishop away from the active position under the threat of a threefold repetition.} 12. Nbd2 {However now there is:} ({The more natural} 12. Nc3 {would be strongly met with} a4 13. Qc2 (13. Nxa4 dxc4 14. Qc2 b5 {leads to the same.}) 13... dxc4 14. Nxa4 b5 {with comfortable position for Black. leads to the same.}) 12... b5 {When Black gets some space to operate on the queenside.} 13. c5 ({The pawn is not worth it:} 13. cxb5 cxb5 14. Qxb5 Ba6 {as the central one on e2 will suffer in return.}) 13... b4 {Frees the bishop.} 14. Qc2 {Caruana was not happy with his play at this stage of the game.} ({He suggested instead} 14. a3 {and this may lead to wild complications after} Ba6 15. e3 e5 $5 16. axb4 ({Or } 16. dxe5 Nxc5 17. exf6 Nxb3 18. fxe7 Qxe7 19. Nxb3) 16... axb4 17. Qxb4 e4 { with compensation for a pawn.}) (14. e4 $5 {might have been an option too. Say} dxe4 15. Ne5 (15. Ng5 e3 $1 16. fxe3 Nd5) 15... a4 16. Qc2 Qc7 17. Nxe4 { and White seems better.}) 14... a4 {So is consistently looking for queenside action.} 15. Re1 {Preparing e2-e4.} ({Both} 15. b3 $5) ({And} 15. e3 $5 { were interesting alternatives according to Caruana.}) 15... e5 $1 {"Maybe this is not the best" So. Black went wrong later.The move in the game frees his pieces and even fights for the initiative.} ({A slow move like} 15... Qc7 { would have allowed} 16. e4 {with all the conveniences after} dxe4 17. Nxe4 Nxe4 18. Qxe4 Nf6 19. Bf4 {with advantage for White.}) 16. Nxe5 Nxe5 17. dxe5 Nd7 18. Nf3 Bxc5 19. Ng5 {Played after ong thought. The position requires rapid action.} ({Slow moves like} 19. Bf4 Qb6) ({or} 19. e4 Qb6 {are good for Black.} ) 19... g6 20. Bf4 Qb6 21. e4 {The most energetic move.} ({Both players considered} 21. e3 {Now} h6 {is wrong to} ({Where Caruana was afraid of} 21... b3 $1 22. axb3 ({Or} 22. Qb1 Bb4 23. Rf1 Nc5 {"followed by Bc8-f5 and can get quickly into strategically lost position" (Caruana)}) 22... axb3 23. Qe2 Ra2 { Let's continue the line a bit with} 24. Bh3 h6 25. Nxf7 Rxf7 26. e6 Rxf4 27. exd7 Bxd7 28. exf4 Bxh3 29. Qe8+ Kg7 30. Re7+ Bxe7 31. Qxe7+ Kg8 32. Qe8+ { and it all ends with perpetual check.}) 22. Nxf7 $1 Kxf7 (22... Rxf7 23. e6) 23. e6+ Kxe6 24. Qxg6+ Ke7 25. Qxh6 {with crushing attack.}) 21... b3 {So is also in a hurry to open up the queenside and deflect the opponent's pieces fom his king.} 22. axb3 axb3 23. Qe2 {The critical moment of the game.} Ba6 $2 { After this White's attack continues unhindered.} ({Correct was:} 23... Ra2 $1 { (Caruana) when White intended} 24. Rab1 ({Or} 24. exd5 Ba6 25. Qf3 Rxb2 26. Ne4 cxd5 27. Nxc5 Nxc5 28. Be3 Bc4 29. Bd4 {"with a mess. The b-pawn might be very, very dangerous" (Caruana)}) 24... Ba6 25. Qf3 {At the very last moment Caruana saw the resource} Bd3 $5 26. Qxd3 Bxf2+ 27. Kh1 Bxe1 28. Rxe1 Rxb2 {and did not like it too much for White. Then indeed} 29. exd5 Qf2 30. Qf1 Nc5 $5 { should be OK for Black.} (30... Qxf1+ 31. Rxf1 Ra2 32. dxc6 b2 33. Be4 Ra1) ( 30... cxd5)) 24. Qf3 Bc4 25. Rxa8 Rxa8 {Black managed to trade a pair of rooks, but had to abandon the kingside. The punishment is swift:} 26. e6 $1 dxe4 ({ Since} 26... fxe6 27. Bc7 $1 {loses on the spot.}) 27. exf7+ Bxf7 28. Nxe4 Bd4 {Makes things even worse, although Black's position is obviously suspicious, to say the least.} (28... Re8 {"was still putting up a good fight"(Caruana). The thing is that the light-squared bishop does enormous defensive work after} 29. Rd1 Bd5 30. Qg4 Be6 31. Qe2 Bd5) 29. Nd6 Bd5 30. Qe2 {Without the light-squared bishop Black cannot hold the kingside.} Nf8 ({Or mate after} 30... Bxg2 31. Qe6+ Kh8 32. Nf7+ Kg8 33. Nd8+ Kg7 34. Qxd7+) 31. Bxd5+ cxd5 32. Qf3 Qa5 {There is no defense against the mating attack. For example} 33. Re7 Qc5 34. Bh6 Qxd6 35. Qf7+ Kh8 36. Bg7+ 1-0 [Event "Berlin GER"] [Site "Berlin GER"] [Date "2018.03.10"] [Round "1.4"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "So, Wesley"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E00"] [WhiteElo "2784"] [BlackElo "2799"] [Annotator "Sagar,Shah"] [PlyCount "65"] [EventDate "2018.03.10"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. g3 Bb4+ 4. Bd2 Be7 5. Bg2 d5 6. Nf3 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. Qb3 Nbd7 9. Bf4 a5 10. Rd1 Nh5 11. Bc1 (11. Bd2 Nhf6 12. Bf4) 11... Nhf6 12. Nbd2 b5 13. c5 (13. cxb5 cxb5 14. Qxb5 Ba6) 13... b4 14. Qc2 a4 15. Re1 e5 $5 16. Nxe5 Nxe5 17. dxe5 Nd7 18. Nf3 Bxc5 (18... Nxc5 19. Be3 Ra5 (19... b3 20. Qc3 $16) 20. Nd4 Bd7 $14) 19. Ng5 g6 20. Bf4 Qb6 21. e4 (21. e6 Bxf2+ $15) 21... b3 (21... d4 22. e6 $16) (21... dxe4 22. e6 $18) (21... Nxe5 22. Bxe5 f6 23. Bc7 $3 (23. exd5 fxe5 24. Kh1 $14) 23... Qxc7 24. Qxc5 fxg5 25. exd5 $18) 22. axb3 axb3 23. Qe2 Ba6 $5 (23... Ra2 $13) (23... Rxa1 24. Rxa1 Nxe5 $5 (24... h6 25. Nxf7 Rxf7 26. e6 Rxf4 27. exd7) (24... Nb8 25. exd5 cxd5 26. Bxd5 $18) 25. Bxe5 f6 26. exd5 fxe5 27. Qxe5 (27. dxc6 Rxf2 28. Qc4+ Kg7 29. Kh1 Rxg2 30. Kxg2 Qxc6+ 31. Ne4 Bb7 32. Re1 Qd5 33. Qxd5 Bxd5 $11) 27... Rxf2 28. Kh1 Bd4 29. Qe7 $18) 24. Qf3 Bc4 25. Rxa8 Rxa8 26. e6 $1 dxe4 27. exf7+ Bxf7 28. Nxe4 Bd4 ( 28... Bd5 29. Qg4) 29. Nd6 Bd5 30. Qe2 Nf8 (30... Bxg2 31. Qe6+ Kg7 (31... Kh8 32. Nf7+ Kg8 33. Nd8+ Kh8 34. Qe8+ Kg7 35. Re7+ Kf6 36. Qf7#) 32. Qxd7+ $18) 31. Bxd5+ cxd5 32. Qf3 $1 Qa5 33. Re7 1-0 [Event "Berlin GER"] [Site "Berlin GER"] [Date "2018.03.12"] [Round "3.4"] [White "Aronian, Levon"] [Black "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C65"] [WhiteElo "2794"] [BlackElo "2800"] [Annotator "Bojkov,Dejan"] [PlyCount "54"] [EventDate "2018.03.10"] 1. e4 {If Aronian only knew what this surprise would lead to....} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. Bxc6 dxc6 6. O-O ({The other way to develop is} 6. Nbd2 Bg4 7. h3 Bh5 8. Nf1 Nd7 9. Ng3 Bxf3 10. Qxf3 g6 11. Be3 Qe7 12. O-O (12. O-O-O O-O-O 13. Ne2 Rhe8 14. Kb1 b6 15. h4 Kb7 {½-½ Anand,V (2775)-Carlsen,M (2870) Chennai IND 2013}) 12... Bd6 13. a4 c5 14. c3 O-O-O 15. Rfb1 Kb8 16. a5 a6 17. Nf1 Qe6 18. Qd1 f5 19. f3 Be7 20. Qa4 Nf6 {1/2-1/2 Jakovenko,D (2710)-Almasi,Z (2707) Germany 2018}) 6... Qe7 7. h3 {Kramnik: "The thing is, Black wants ... Bg4 after Nbd2. I always considered 7.h3 as a very serious move and I actually spent a lot of time analyzing it, and it was not so easy. But then, a couple of years ago, I found this very strong resource:} Rg8 $1 {"g7-g5-g4 is a big threat" (Kramnik). Apparently, White is not capable of opening the center, otherwise this whole concept will fail. Ironically, it is the pawn on h3 which makes this idea so strong. The weakened kingside and the fast long-ranged black pieces put White in a huge danger.} 8. Kh1 {Both players could not find anything better. Here are some lines to convince that Black's attack is not a joke:} ({The attempt to get a better version of the game continuation with} 8. c3 {would be met with} g5 9. d4 ({The pawn is immune due to} 9. Bxg5 Bxh3 { this is a frequently occurring theme in the attack.}) 9... exd4 $1 ({If now Black continues as in the game} 9... Bd6 10. dxe5 Bxe5 11. Nxe5 Qxe5 12. Qd4 { White would be indeed OK.}) 10. cxd4 Bb6 {when the white center is about to crumble at any moment and the captures on g5 are always bad.} 11. Bxg5 ({Or} 11. Nxg5 h6 12. Nf3 Bxh3) 11... Bxh3 $1 {with huge advantage for Black.}) (8. Be3 {trades the good bishop but doe snot slow down the attack-} Bxe3 9. fxe3 g5 ) ({If} 8. Nc3 g5 9. Bxg5 Bxh3 $1 10. gxh3 h6 {is similar to the first line above and excellent for Black.}) 8... Nh5 $146 {Technically speaking this is the novelty.} ({As this all has been seen previously in a correspondence game, which Black won after:} 8... h6 9. Nbd2 g5 10. Nc4 Bd6 11. d4 Nxe4 12. dxe5 Bc5 13. Qe2 f5 {etc., Kazoks,A (2345)-Calio,M (2334) corr. 2015}) 9. c3 {Obviously White needs to do something and do it fast. This move is aiming for a quick central counter-blow.} ({Aronian "Maybe I should have gone for"} 9. Nc3 { "It will be like the game" said Kramnik and suggested} g5 10. Nxe5 g4 11. d4 Bd6 ({The other suggestion of the former world champion is not as good-} 11... gxh3 12. g3 ({Or even} 12. g4 $1) 12... Nf6 13. dxc5 Qxe5 14. Bf4 Qxc5 15. Bxc7 {and here it might be White who is better.})) 9... g5 10. Nxe5 ({If} 10. d4 { Black can always go for} exd4 ({Or even} 10... g4 11. dxc5 gxf3 12. Qxf3 Qh4 { "with dangerous threats" (Kramnik)}) 11. cxd4 Bb6 12. Nh2 Nf6 13. e5 Nd5 { with clear advantage as the kingside attack proceeds without any problems after Bc8-e6 and 0-0-0.}) 10... g4 ({Of course not:} 10... Qxe5 11. d4 Qe7 12. Qxh5) 11. d4 ({The captures on g4 lead to mate after} 11. Nxg4 Bxg4 12. hxg4 Qh4+ 13. Kg1 Ng3) 11... Bd6 ({Wrong is} 11... gxh3 12. g3 $1) 12. g3 ({Another mating picture occurs after} 12. Nxg4 Bxg4 13. hxg4 Qh4+ 14. Kg1 Qh2#) 12... Bxe5 13. dxe5 Qxe5 14. Qd4 Qe7 $1 {Kramnik wants mate!} ({Aronian was hoping for a slightly worse endgame after} 14... Qxd4 15. cxd4 gxh3) 15. h4 c5 16. Qc4 {"A terrible blunder; I forgot that Black is threatening ...f5." (Aronian)} ({ The best chance according to Kramnik was} 16. Qd3 Bd7 17. c4 O-O-O 18. Nc3 Bc6 19. Nd5 Qe5 {when Black is better but the game goes on.}) 16... Be6 17. Qb5+ c6 18. Qa4 (18. Qe2 {will be met as well with} f5 $1) ({White's best was still} 18. Qd3 Rd8 19. Qe3 {although Black is clearly better here after}) 18... f5 $1 19. Bg5 ({"The main point was"} 19. exf5 Nxg3+ $1 {which lead to mate after} 20. fxg3 Bd5+ 21. Kg1 Qe2 22. Rf2 Qe1+ 23. Rf1 Qxg3# {(Kramnik)}) 19... Rxg5 $1 {Not slowing down at all. White's position is in ruins, Kramnik accurately finishes the game.} 20. hxg5 f4 21. Qd1 ({Or} 21. gxf4 Nxf4 22. Qc2 Qxg5) ({And } 21. Kg2 Qxg5 {with decisive attack in both cases.}) 21... Rd8 22. Qc1 fxg3 23. Na3 Rd3 24. Rd1 Bd5 25. f3 ({Or mate after} 25. Rxd3 Qxe4+) 25... gxf3 26. exd5 ({"The main idea was to win with"} 26. Rxd3 Qxe4 27. Re3 f2+ 28. Rxe4+ Bxe4# {(Kramnik)}) 26... Qe2 27. Re1 g2+ (27... g2+ {Aronian resigned because of} 28. Kh2 g1=Q+ 29. Kxg1 f2+ 30. Kg2 fxe1=Q#) 0-1 [Event "Berlin GER"] [Site "Berlin GER"] [Date "2018.03.16"] [Round "6"] [White "So, Wesley"] [Black "Aronian, Levon"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C88"] [WhiteElo "2799"] [BlackElo "2794"] [PlyCount "155"] [EventDate "2018.03.10"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8. a4 b4 9. a5 d6 10. d3 Be6 11. Bxe6 fxe6 12. Nbd2 Rb8 {This line was heavily discussed last year in St. Louis.} 13. Nb3 ({Carlsen chose instead} 13. c3 Qe8 14. Nc4 Qg6 15. h3 Nd7 16. Be3 d5 17. Ncd2 bxc3 18. bxc3 Nc5 19. Bxc5 Bxc5 20. Qa4 {and went on to win later, Carlsen,M (2822)-Aronian,L (2809) Saint Louis 2017. However, there remained a lot of questions about White's chances in this game.}) 13... Qc8 14. h3 $146 {So improves on another St. Louis game.} ({ In that one the world champion defended the black color after} 14. Qe2 Nd8 15. d4 exd4 16. Nbxd4 c5 17. Nb3 e5 18. Nbd2 Ne6 {Caruana,F (2807) -Carlsen,M (2822) Saint Louis 2017}) 14... Nd8 15. Be3 c5 16. Nbd2 Nc6 17. c3 Rb5 18. d4 ( {White can of course keep the pawn with either} 18. Nc4) ({Or} 18. Nb3 { but Black would have no problems at all in these lines.}) 18... exd4 {An ambitious move.} ({Aronian saw that he can equalize with:} 18... bxc3 19. bxc3 exd4 20. cxd4 c4 ({Probably also good is} 20... cxd4 21. Nxd4 Nxd4 22. Bxd4 Nd7 ) ({Maybe even} 20... Nxa5 21. dxc5 dxc5 22. Qa4 {is a better version of the game continuation for Black. Although with so many weaknesses White still has decent compensation for a pawn.}) 21. Nxc4 Nxe4 {"should be around equal" (Aronian)}) (18... Nxa5 $2 {should be avoided though as it drops a piece after} 19. dxe5 dxe5 (19... bxc3 20. bxc3 dxe5 21. c4) 20. c4) 19. cxd4 Nxa5 20. dxc5 dxc5 {In return for the pawn White has active pieces and can exploit the many weaknesses in the opponent's camp.} 21. Ra2 {"I kind of prepared this line" (So). He later revealed that he considered the position equal.} Qb7 ({Here and on the next moves Aronian avoids} 21... Nc6 {in order to keep the c4 square under control and not to let the white queen there.}) ({The American GM expected} 21... Nd7 {with the idea Nd7-b8-c6.}) 22. b3 ({If} 22. Qa1 Bd8) 22... Kh8 {"I was a little surprised by this, but it is probably a good move." (So)} ({Aronian disliked the position after:} 22... Nxe4 23. Nxe4 Qxe4 24. Bg5 Qb7 25. Qe2 Bxg5 26. Nxg5 {"maybe it holds somehow but it was not the position I wanted to get" (Aronian)} Qd5 27. Nxe6) ({Black also disliked} 22... Nd7 23. Qe2 {as he felt he should keep the knight on f6.}) 23. Qc2 {So is combining threats against the weaknesses on the queenside with threats on the opposite wing. Now e4-e5 followed by Nf3-g5 is always a threat.} Nd7 ({If} 23... Nc6 { to centralize this knight, then either} 24. Nc4 ({Or} 24. Ng5)) 24. Rea1 Bd8 25. Nc4 ({Aronian saw the excellent reply to} 25. e5 c4 26. Nxc4 Nxc4 27. Qxc4 Rxf3 $1 {with a fantastic counter-attack.}) 25... Nxc4 26. Qxc4 Bf6 ({After} 26... a5 27. Rd1 $1 {is strong.} ({Rather than} 27. Qxe6 Rb6 28. Qc4 Rd6 { although here too, White is better.})) 27. Rd1 Qc6 28. Rad2 {Little by little the white pieces occupied commanding positions.} Nb6 (28... Ne5 {is unpleasant for Black after} 29. Nxe5 Bxe5 30. Rd8 {(Aronian, So)}) 29. Qc2 Qc7 {After this move Black's position becomes too loose.} ({Black rejected} 29... Qc8 $1 { on the account of} 30. e5 Bd8 31. Bg5 {But this seems way better than the game continuation after} (31. Bxc5 $2 Rxc5 32. Rxd8 Rxc2 {wins for Black.}) 31... Nd5 $1 {This was probably Black's best chance.}) ({After} 29... e5 30. Bg5 $1 { is strong for White (Aronian)}) 30. e5 $1 {So breaks open the position for his active pieces. The rook on b5 and the knight on b6 are out of the game and So attacks practically with an extra rook.} ({Also quite unpleasant for the second player was the resource} 30. Bg5 $5 {(Aronian) with the threat e4-e5 and if} c4 31. Bxf6 gxf6 32. Nd4 Re5 33. f4 {wins material for White.}) 30... Be7 (30... Bxe5 $2 {drops material heavily after} 31. Ng5 g6 32. Nxe6) ({Here} 30... Bd8 {does not work (see the line from the previous comment) due to} 31. Bxc5 $1 Rxc5 32. Rxd8 Rxc2 33. Rxf8#) 31. Nd4 Rc8 ({Perhaps the last chance was the eventual endgame after} 31... Qxe5 32. Nxb5 axb5 33. Re2 Qc3) 32. Nxe6 $1 {White keeps playing for the attack.} ({"It does not make any sense to take the exchange"} 32. Nxb5 axb5 33. f4 Nd5 {"as Black is at least equal" (Aronian, So). The black connected passers are perfectly supported by all his pieces.}) 32... Qxe5 33. Nf4 {Aronian did not expect this and "relaxed too soon" after seeing it. He later called the move "excellent practical chance."} ({Aronian spend almost all his remaining time on the sharp and beautiful lines:} 33. Rd6 $1 {with the threat Be3-f4! (So did not see this) If} Kg8 ({The main tactical point of the move is that} 33... Bxd6 $1 34. Ng5 {is a nasty double attack.}) ( {Probably} 33... Re8 {leaves defensive chances to Black.}) 34. Bf4 Qf6 35. Ng5 {wins for White.}) ({Black was also afraid of} 33. Nd8 {when after} Kg8 34. Rd7 c4 ({Aronian intended} 34... Qf6 {but this loses to} 35. Bg5 $3 Qxg5 36. Qe2 $1 ) (34... h6) 35. Bd4 Qf5 $2 ({However} 35... Nxd7 $1 36. Bxe5 Nxe5 {provides Black drawing chances.}) 36. Rxe7 Rxd8 (36... Qxc2 37. Re8#) 37. Rxg7+ { and White should win.}) 33... Rf8 {This is "bad" (So); "a terrible move." (Aronian)} (33... Kg8 $1 {was mandatory} 34. Re2 Bf8 {when Black can cement his position.}) 34. Re2 $1 {Now the black pieces are once again loose.} Qc3 ({ Last chance was} 34... Bf6 $5) ({Aronian's initial plan was} 34... Qf5 35. Qxf5 Rxf5 {but then he spotted} 36. Bc1 $1 {"and Black can resign"(Aronian). For example} Bf8 37. Rd8 Kg8 38. Ree8 c4 39. g4 Rf6 40. Ne6) 35. Qb1 $1 (35. Qa2 { with the same idea was also very strong as indicated by the Armenian GM.}) 35... Qf6 ({Or} 35... Nc8 36. Bd2 Qf6 37. Ne6 Rg8 38. Bg5 Qf7 39. Bxe7 Nxe7 ( 39... Qxe7 40. Nd4) 40. Ng5 Qg6 41. Qxg6 Nxg6 42. Nf7#) 36. Bc1 $1 {"Here the game is already finished. It is just (white) pieces coming." (Aronian)} c4 ({ A curious line is} 36... Qf7 37. Bb2 Bf6 38. Bxf6 Qxf6 39. Ne6 Rg8 40. Nc7 Ra5 41. Ne8 Qg5 42. Nd6) 37. bxc4 Nxc4 ({Alas,} 37... Rg5 {does not work due to} 38. Re6 $1 {(Aronian)} ({But not} 38. Ne6 $2 Rxg2+ $1 39. Kxg2 Qf3+)) 38. Re6 Qg5 {Sacrifices the queen in the vain hope of a fortress.} ({Or else Black will lose material on the pin} 38... Qf7 39. Rd7 Re8 40. Qe4) 39. Ng6+ ({ There was an alternative win} 39. Rd7 Bf6 40. Rf7 $1 Rbb8 (40... Rg8 41. Rexf6) 41. Rxf8+ Rxf8 42. Qxb4 Rc8 43. Qxc4 $1) 39... Qxg6 40. Rxg6 hxg6 41. Qe4 { This is the problem. More material is lost.} Bf6 42. Qxc4 b3 43. Ba3 Rfb8 ({If } 43... b2 44. Bxf8 b1=Q 45. Rxb1 Rxb1+ 46. Kh2) 44. Rb1 b2 45. h4 {The rest is good technique by So.} (45. Qa4 $5 a5 46. h4) 45... Ra5 (45... a5 46. Bd6 R8b7 47. g4 Rb3 48. Kg2 {(Aronian, So)}) 46. Qd3 Rd8 (46... Bxh4 47. Rxb2) 47. Qb3 Rc8 48. Qb7 Rd8 49. Qb3 Rc8 50. Qb4 Rb5 51. Qg4 Rc3 (51... Rcb8 52. Qxg6) 52. Bxb2 Rxb2 53. Rxb2 Rc1+ 54. Kh2 Bxb2 55. Qxg6 Ra1 56. g4 a5 57. Qh5+ Kg8 58. Qb5 Ba3 ({The utility of the kingside pawns is revealed after} 58... Bf6 59. Qe8+ Kh7 60. g5 Bc3 (60... Bb2 61. Qe4+ Kg8 62. g6 Kf8 63. Qe6) 61. Qh5+ Kg8 62. g6 Kf8 63. Qc5+) 59. Qe5 Rd1 60. Qe6+ Kh7 61. Qe4+ Kh8 62. Qa8+ Kh7 63. Qxa5 Bd6+ 64. Kg2 Rd4 65. Qf5+ Kh8 66. Qh5+ Kg8 67. g5 Kf8 68. Qg6 Be7 69. Qf5+ Ke8 70. Kh3 Rd6 71. Qh7 Kf7 72. f4 Rd4 73. Qf5+ Ke8 74. Qe5 Rb4 75. Kg4 Kf8 76. Qf5+ Ke8 77. Qe6 Rd4 (77... Kf8 78. Qc8+ Kf7 79. g6+ Kxg6 80. Qf5+ Kh6 81. Qh5# ) 78. Qe5 1-0 [Event "Berlin GER"] [Site "Berlin GER"] [Date "2018.03.19"] [Round "8.2"] [White "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Black "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D40"] [WhiteElo "2767"] [BlackElo "2800"] [PlyCount "181"] [EventDate "2018.03.10"] 1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nf3 c5 5. e3 dxc4 6. Bxc4 a6 7. Bb3 ({Instead, the world champion chose:} 7. O-O b5 8. Be2 Bb7 9. dxc5 Bxc5 10. Qxd8+ Kxd8 11. Nd2 {against Wesley So and later won, Carlsen,M (2832)-So,W (2815) chess.com INT 2017}) 7... b5 8. e4 cxd4 9. Nxd4 Bb7 {The opening that Kramnik chose is somewhat provocative as he is lagging in development. Grischuk has every right to play aggressively.} 10. e5 $146 ({Therapeutic measures do not yield White anything:} 10. O-O Nc6 11. Be3 Bd6 12. Nxc6 Bxc6 13. Bd4 Qc7 14. Bxf6 gxf6 15. Qh5 O-O {with equality in the predecessor Maljush,A (2344)-Kupreichik, V (2464) Minsk 2004}) 10... Ne4 {The alternatives were:} (10... Bxg2 $2 {which drops a piece after} 11. Rg1) (10... Nd5 {which gives full control to White after} 11. Nxd5 Bxd5 12. O-O Bxb3 13. axb3) ({And} 10... Nfd7 {which allows the dangerous sacrifice} 11. Bxe6 fxe6 12. Nxe6 Qc8 13. O-O) 11. O-O ({Safer and easier seems } 11. Nxe4 Bxe4 12. O-O {with the idea to exploit the position of the black bishop for further tempo-gainers, such as Qd1-g4 at the proper moment. If} Nc6 13. Nxc6 Bxc6 ({Better is} 13... Qxd1 14. Rxd1 Bxc6 15. Be3 {although White is a bit better in the endgame as well.}) 14. Qg4 {with advantage for White.}) 11... Nxc3 12. bxc3 Nc6 13. a4 ({Also interesting is} 13. Qf3 Rc8 {with the idea} 14. Nxc6 Bxc6 ({The cunning} 14... Qh4 $5 {to deprive White of the Qf3-g3 maneuver is answered by the even more cunning} 15. Bd5 $5 exd5 16. Nd4 { when White is better.}) 15. Qg3) 13... Bc5 $1 {Kramnik catches up with the development as quickly as he can.} 14. axb5 axb5 ({Weaker is} 14... Nxd4 15. cxd4 Bxd4 16. Ra4 Bxe5 17. Qh5 {when White gets everything that he wants.}) 15. Rxa8 Bxa8 16. Nxb5 O-O {Just sacking the pawn.} ({White wins a pawn after} 16... Qxd1 17. Rxd1 Nxe5 18. Nc7+ Ke7 19. Bg5+ f6 20. Nxe6 fxg5 21. Nxc5 Rc8 22. Na4) ({However} 16... Nxe5 {looks solid enough. For example:} 17. Qe2 ({ White has nothing in case of:} 17. Qxd8+ Kxd8 18. Rd1+ (18. Bg5+ f6) 18... Ke7) 17... Nd7 18. Rd1 O-O) 17. Qxd8 Rxd8 18. Bf4 h6 19. h4 Ne7 {For the pawn Black has more active pieces and the c3 pawn is far from dangerous.} 20. Rd1 Rb8 $1 { The black rook is more valuable than his counterpart.} ({Surely not} 20... Rxd1+ 21. Bxd1) 21. Bc4 ({After} 21. c4 Bc6 22. Ba4 Nf5 {Black gets strong counter-play on the kingside. Say:} 23. h5 Nh4 24. g3 Nf3+ 25. Kf1 Nh2+ 26. Kg1 Ng4 $1) 21... Bc6 22. Nd4 Be4 (22... Bxd4 23. cxd4 Nf5 {should be easy to draw for Black (Svidler).}) 23. h5 (23. Re1 $5 Bg6 24. Be3 {might be better.}) 23... Nd5 24. Bxd5 ({In the coming time-trouble Grischuk wants to keep the black rook away from the second rank:} 24. Bd2 Rb2 25. Bxd5 Bxd5 26. Be3) 24... Bxd5 {With the gain of the bishop pair Black's compensation became more obvious. Experienced players know that the power of the pair often compensates for a pawn.} 25. Be3 Rc8 ({If} 25... Rb2 26. Ra1 $1) 26. Re1 Bc4 27. Nf3 Ba3 28. Bd4 Bd3 29. Nd2 Bb2 30. Nf1 Rc4 ({Or} 30... Kf8 31. Re3 Bh7) 31. Re3 Bf5 ({Kramnik rejected} 31... Bxc3 32. Bxc3 Rxc3 {because he could not see a way to break the pin after} 33. f3 {However, there is no progress either as White cannot win without the king but whenever he tries to activate it , say like this-} g6 34. hxg6 fxg6 35. Kh2 {then the rook escapes-} Rc1 {with a draw.}) 32. Ng3 Bh7 33. Kh2 $1 {Now the king enters the battle in a slightly unusual way and Black has to fight for his life.} Bc1 34. Re2 Bf4 35. Kh3 Ra4 (35... Bg5 $5 {was interesting with the idea to generate counterplay after} 36. Kg4 Bd3 37. Ra2 f6 ) 36. Kg4 Bc1 37. Kf3 Bd3 38. Re1 Bb2 39. Ke3 Bc2 40. Kd2 Bb3 $6 {Kramnik believed this was wrong and suggested to keep the bishop on the b1-h7 diagonal. } (40... Bh7 41. Ne4) 41. Rb1 {The first time control is finally reached and Grischuk starts improving everything that he can.} Ra2 42. Kd3 Ba4 43. Ne4 Ba3 44. Ke3 Bc2 45. Re1 Bb3 46. g4 Bd5 47. Kd3 Be7 48. Rb1 Ra8 49. f4 Bh4 50. Rh1 Bd8 51. Rb1 Bc7 52. Ke3 Kh7 53. Nd6 Kg8 ({The opposite-colored bishop endgame after} 53... Bxd6 $2 54. exd6 Rd8 55. Rb6 {is lost for Black.}) 54. Rb5 Bc6 55. Rb4 Bd8 56. Bb6 Bh4 57. Bd4 Bg2 58. Rb2 Bc6 59. Rb6 Bg2 60. Rb2 Bc6 61. Rb3 Bg3 {So far so good, but here White hurried to push the pawn.} 62. c4 $6 ({Instead he should have prepared it for one more move-} 62. Ne4 Bh4 ({Here} 62... Bh2 { is just bad due to} 63. Rb2 Bg1+ 64. Kd3 Bxd4 65. Kxd4) 63. c4 {with decent winning chances.}) 62... Bh2 $1 {Now Black is back in business.} 63. f5 ({ White has nothing more than repetition in the line} 63. c5 Bd5 64. Rc3 Bc6) 63... exf5 64. Nxf5 ({According to Kramnik, Grischuk should have gone for} 64. gxf5 f6 65. Rb6) 64... Kh7 65. Bb2 {Once again the players entered the low-time phase.} Re8 (65... Ra2 $5) 66. Nd6 Re7 67. Rb8 f6 68. Rc8 Bh1 $6 { Getting overly ambitious again.} ({Instead} 68... Bxe5 69. Bxe5 Rxe5+ 70. Kf4 Bd7 {"should be a draw" (Kramnik) although it is evident that Black needs to suffer for it.}) ({However Kramnik's second idea} 68... Bd7 $1 {was strong when after} 69. Rc7 fxe5 70. c5 e4 $1 {would be the correct move order. Here Black is perfectly fine.} ({Rather than} 70... Bf4+ {which allows the interesting resource:} 71. Ke4 (71. Kf2 e4) 71... Bf5+ 72. gxf5 Rxc7 73. Kd5)) 69. Nf5 Rb7 70. exf6 ({Even stronger was:} 70. e6 $1 Rb3+ 71. Bc3) 70... Rb3+ { This was the position that Black evaluated in his favor, but..} 71. Bc3 $1 { Kramnik completely missed this study-like idea.} ({Instead} 71. Kd4 Bg1+ 72. Ke5 {is perpetual after} gxf6+ 73. Kxf6 Rxb2 74. Rc7+) ({While} 71. Kf2 { drops the bishop} Rxb2+) 71... gxf6 (71... Rxc3+ 72. Kd4 {wins for White.}) 72. Kd2 Bf4+ 73. Kc2 {Grischuk kept the extra pawn but what's more important has nasty threats in the time-trouble.} Rb8 74. Rxb8 Bxb8 75. Ne7 $1 {"Very strong practical chance." (Kramnik)} (75. Bxf6 {is a draw after} Bf3 76. Ne3 Ba7 77. Kd3 Bxe3 78. Kxe3 Bxg4) 75... Be4+ ({Kramnik's suggestion} 75... Ba7 {does not seem convincing here:} 76. Kd3 Bf3 77. Nd5) ({Best seems to be} 75... Bf3 76. Nd5 Be5 77. Bxe5 fxe5 78. Ne3 Kg7 {when Black has chances to hold.}) 76. Kd2 Bf4+ {White soon won second pawn and the game.} 77. Ke2 Kg7 (77... Bg5 78. c5) 78. Nf5+ Kf7 79. Bd2 Be5 80. Bxh6 Ke6 81. Be3 Bxf5 82. gxf5+ Kxf5 83. h6 Kg6 ({ Or} 83... Ke4 84. h7 f5 85. c5 Kd5 86. Kd3) 84. c5 f5 85. Kf3 Kf7 86. Bf4 Bd4 87. c6 Ke7 88. c7 Kd7 89. h7 Kc8 90. Ke2 Kd7 91. Kd3 1-0 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.03.19"] [Round "?"] [White "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Black "Ding, Liren"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A26"] [Annotator "user"] [PlyCount "147"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. d3 g6 5. g3 Bg7 6. Bg2 O-O 7. O-O d6 { Диаграмма} 8. b3 {Редкий ход.} ({Главная линия - } 8. Rb1 {.}) 8... Nd4 ({Вариант} 8... e4 $6 9. dxe4 Nxe4 10. Nxe4 Bxa1 11. Bg5 f6 12. Bh6 {дает белым лучшие шансы.}) 9. Nd2 c6 10. e3 Ne6 {Диаграмма} 11. Bb2 {Новинка.} ({Владимир избрал} 11. Ba3 {в партии с Максимом Вашье-Лагравом (Мемориал Алехина 2013, 1/2).}) 11... Nc5 12. Qc2 a5 13. Rae1 Re8 14. h3 Bf5 15. e4 Bd7 16. Ne2 b5 { Диаграмма} 17. d4 ({Проблема выбора структуры - одна из сложнейших в шахматах. Мне кажется, что сильнее} 17. f4 $1 {.}) 17... exd4 18. Nxd4 ({ Интересно} 18. Bxd4 $5 {с идеей, скажем, на} Rc8 $2 { получить структурный перевес путем} 19. Bxc5 $1 dxc5 20. f4 {.}) 18... Rc8 {Диаграмма} 19. N4f3 $6 { Неудачный ход.} ({Предпочтительнее} 19. f4 { с неясной игрой.}) 19... d5 $1 {Программный подрыв структуры.} 20. exd5 $6 (20. Ne5 {оставляло белым надежды на уравнение.}) 20... Rxe1 21. Rxe1 { Диаграмма} cxd5 $2 (21... Bf5 $1 {давало большие шансы на победу. После} 22. Qd1 Nd3 23. Bxf6 Bxf6 {во избежание худшего белые должны отдать качество.}) 22. cxb5 $2 (22. Ne5 $1 {уравнивало игру.}) 22... Bf5 23. Qd1 Nd3 24. Bd4 {Диаграмма} Rc1 $1 ({В случае} 24... Nxe1 $2 25. Qxe1 {проходная белых компенсирует небольшой материальный дефицит.}) 25. Qxc1 Nxc1 26. Rxc1 Ne4 27. Nf1 {Диаграмма} Bxd4 $2 ({После} 27... Bd7 $1 { Дин мог рассчитывать на успех. Например:} 28. Bxg7 ({проигрывает} 28. a4 $2 Bxd4 29. Nxd4 Nxf2 $1) 28... Kxg7 29. a4 Qf6 {с решающим перевесом.}) 28. Nxd4 Qb6 29. Bxe4 dxe4 $6 ({Точнее} 29... Bxe4 $1 {, вынуждая ответ} 30. Rd1 {. Компьютер придерживается материалистической парадигмы и оценивает перевес черных в пешку. Моя оценка скромнее: черные вне зоны риска.}) 30. Nxf5 gxf5 31. a4 Qe6 {Диаграмма Компьютер справедливо ставит нули, зато у белых моральный перевес.} 32. Ne3 ({Наиболее амбициозна попытка } 32. Rc4 $5 {с идеей провести b4 и образовать пару связанных проходных. Четкая реакция на это -} h5 $1 33. h4 f4 34. gxf4 Qg4+ 35. Ng3 e3 {, и белые должны переключить свои помыслы на достижение ничьей.}) 32... Qxb3 33. Rc4 h5 34. h4 Kh7 35. Kg2 f6 36. Rd4 Kg6 37. Rc4 Kf7 38. Kh2 Kg6 39. Kg1 Qb1+ 40. Kg2 Qb3 41. Rd4 Kf7 42. Rd5 Qxa4 43. Rxf5 Kg6 44. b6 Qb3 45. Rxa5 Qxb6 {Диаграмма Ничейный исход стал очевиден. Однако борьба продолжалась еще тридцать ходов. У меня были серьезные опасения, что Крамник снова перегнет палку. К счастью, они оказались напрасны.} 46. Rd5 Qb2 47. Rf5 Qa2 48. Rc5 Qe2 49. Rc4 Qa2 50. Rb4 Qa5 51. Rb8 Qa2 52. Rd8 Qa5 53. Rd5 Qa2 54. Rf5 Qe6 55. Rd5 Qa6 {Диаграмма} 56. g4 {Владимир сеет ветер...} hxg4 57. h5+ Kf7 58. Rd7+ Ke6 59. Rg7 Qe2 60. h6 Qf3+ 61. Kg1 g3 62. Rxg3 Qh5 63. Rg7 { Диаграмма} f5 ({На} 63... Qxh6 $6 {заготовлен удар} 64. Re7+ $1 Kxe7 65. Nf5+ Ke6 66. Nxh6 {. Диаграмма Правда, позиция ничейна:} f5 67. Kf1 ({Другая возможность -} 67. Kg2 Ke5 ({проигрывает} 67... Kf6 $4 68. Kg3 Kg6 69. Kf4 Kxh6 70. Kxf5) 68. Kg3 e3 {с ничьей.}) 67... e3 $5 68. f3 ({после} 68. fxe3 Ke5 69. Nf7+ Ke4 70. Kf2 f4 { разменивается последний белый пехотинец}) 68... f4 69. Ke2 Kf6 70. Ng4+ Ke6 71. Kd3 {Диаграмма} Kf5 $1 ({ Если конь выйдет на волю, то принесет успех своей команде:} 71... Kd5 $4 72. Nf6+ Ke5 73. Ne4 Kf5 74. Nc3 Ke5 75. Ne2 {.})) 64. h7 f4 65. Ng4 ({Надежнее} 65. Ng2 {, и у черных нет больше вечного шаха -} Qd1+ 66. Kh2 Qh5+ { .}) 65... Qh3 66. Rg6+ Kf5 67. Rg7 {Диаграмма} Ke6 ({Черные могут поиграть на цугцванг:} 67... Qh4 68. Kg2 Qh5 69. Kg1 Qh3 {. Диаграмма Но победы это не приносит. После} 70. Nh2 f3 71. Rg3 Qxh7 72. Nxf3 $1 ({возможно и} 72. Nf1) 72... exf3 73. Rxf3+ {на доске крепость: белые просто курсируют ладьей между полями е3 и g3. Диаграмма}) 68. Rg6+ Kf5 69. Nh6+ Kxg6 70. h8=Q Qxh6 71. Qe8+ Kf5 { Диаграмма Не надо быть мастером, чтобы увидеть, что белые без пешки. Однако их спасает вечный шах.} 72. Qb5+ $1 Kg4 73. Qe2+ $1 Kf5 74. Qb5+ 1/2-1/2 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.03.19"] [Round "?"] [White "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Black "So, Wesley "] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E51"] [Annotator "user"] [PlyCount "80"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 O-O 5. Nf3 d5 6. Bd2 ({Чаще играли} 6. Bd3 {, но и ход в партии встречался бессчетное количество раз.}) 6... c5 7. a3 { Диаграмма} cxd4 $6 ({Лучше} 7... Bxc3 $1 8. Bxc3 Ne4 {. Отмечу здесь дискуссию между Ароняном и Анандом (Лондон 2015, 1/2).}) 8. axb4 dxc3 9. Bxc3 dxc4 10. Bxc4 Qxd1+ {Диаграмма Позиция довольно тонкая. Обладание двумя слонами дает белым инициативу, но ее непросто материализовать.} 11. Kxd1 {Сергей решил, что ладья может пригодиться на вертикали "а". Это новинка.} ({В партии Сандипан - Висах (Индия 2015, 1-0) было сыграно} 11. Rxd1 {.}) 11... Bd7 12. Ke2 {Похоже на неточность, после чего черные выходят сухими из воды.} ({Можно попробовать поиграть на доминацию:} 12. Ne5 $5 Ne4 (12... Rc8 13. f3 Be8 14. e4 $14) 13. Ke2 Nxc3+ 14. bxc3 Rc8 15. Bd3 Rxc3 ( 15... Be8 $14) 16. Rhc1 Rc8 17. Nxd7 Rxc1 18. Rxc1 Nxd7 19. Rc7 Ne5 {. Диаграмма Трудно оценить позицию без детального анализа.} 20. Rxb7 ({или} 20. Be4 {дает белым, по крайней мере, практические шансы.} )) ({Другая возможность развития инициативы заключается в размене одного из слонов:} 12. Bxf6 $5 gxf6 13. b5 {. Занятен прямой вариант, где белые добиваются успеха:} Rc8 14. Bd3 Rc5 15. Kd2 Bxb5 $2 16. Ra5 a6 17. Rha1 Nc6 18. Rxb5 {.}) 12... Rc8 13. Bd3 Nd5 14. Ne5 Be8 15. Bd2 {Диаграмма} f6 ({После} 15... Na6 $1 16. Bxa6 bxa6 {у черных не может возникнуть и тени проблем.}) 16. Nc4 Rd8 17. Rhc1 Nc6 18. Be4 Ndxb4 19. Bxb4 Nxb4 20. Bxb7 Rab8 21. Rxa7 Rd7 22. Na5 Nd3 {Диаграмма} 23. Rd1 ({После ходов} 23. Rc2 Bg6 24. Rc3 {сильнейшая линия ведет к равенству, однако отклонения от нее довольно любопытны.} h6 ({После жадного} 24... Nxb2 $6 25. Rb3 $1 { возникает Crestообразная связка. На} Nd3 {белые ответят эффектным} 26. Bd5 $1 {с выигрышем пешки.}) 25. Ra8 Rxa8 ({не проходит} 25... Rdxb7 $4 {из-за} 26. Rc8+) 26. Bxa8 Nxb2 $11) 23... Nxb2 24. Rxd7 Bxd7 25. Bc6 Bxc6 26. Nxc6 { Диаграмма Положение близко к ничейному. Впрочем, можно проиграть и выигранную позицию.} Re8 ({Имело смысл не ставить ладью в пассив и предпочесть} 26... Rb6 $5 {.}) 27. e4 Nc4 28. Kd3 Nd6 29. f4 {Диаграмма} Kf8 $6 {Неудачный ход.} ({ После} 29... h5 $1 {за белых не видно возможностей поставить проблемы перед соперником.}) 30. e5 $1 fxe5 31. fxe5 Nf5 32. g4 Nh4 33. Kc4 Nf3 34. Ra2 Rc8 35. Kb5 {Диаграмма} Ke8 $2 {Уэсли не разгадал замысла соперника и допустил фатальную ошибку.} ({Удерживало равновесие} 35... Rc7 $1 { . Оборона черных держится на варианте:} 36. Rf2 Rf7 37. Nd8 $4 Nd4+ {.}) 36. Kb6 $1 {Ладье становится тесно.} g5 ({Не оставляет надежд} 36... Rxc6+ 37. Kxc6 Nxe5+ 38. Kd6 Nxg4 39. Kxe6 Kd8 40. Rg2 h5 41. h3 {.}) 37. h3 Nxe5 38. Nxe5 Rc3 {Диаграмма} 39. Rh2 ({После} 39. Ra7 $1 {возможны элегантные матовые конструкции.} Rxh3 40. Kc6 h5 41. Kd6 Kf8 42. Rf7+ Kg8 (42... Ke8 43. gxh5 Rxh5 44. Re7+ Kf8 45. Nd7+ Kg8 46. Nf6+) 43. Ke7 hxg4 44. Nxg4 Rh4 45. Nf6+ Kh8 46. Rf8+ Kg7 47. Rg8+ Kh6 48. Kf7 Ra4 49. Rg6#) 39... Ke7 40. Kb5 {Для выигрыша от белых требуется техническая работа, ведь потенциальное окончание "ладья и конь против ладьи" теоретически ничейно. Однако Карякину не пришлось демонстрировать свою блестящую технику, поскольку Со не успел пережать часы после хода} Re3 {и просрочил время.} 1-0 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.03.19"] [Round "?"] [White "Aronian, Levon"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D39"] [Annotator "user"] [PlyCount "74"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. e4 Bb4 6. Bg5 h6 7. Bxf6 Qxf6 8. Bxc4 {Диаграмма Соперники пришли к Венскому варианту защиты Рагозина.} c5 9. O-O cxd4 10. e5 Qd8 11. Ne4 O-O 12. Qe2 Be7 13. Rad1 Qc7 {Диаграмма} 14. Bd3 {Новинка.} ({Эта позиция встречалась в двух партиях Георга Майера за черных - с Валентином Иотовым (США 2012, 1/2) и Александра Моисеенко (Израиль 2017, 1/2). В обеих последовало} 14. Ng3 {.}) 14... Nd7 15. Rc1 Qa5 {Диаграмма} 16. g4 $5 {Левон идет ставить мат. Такие яркие ходы весьма привлекательны, но не всегда способствуют достижению желаемого результата.} Nxe5 17. Nxe5 Qxe5 18. f4 Qa5 19. g5 {Диаграмма} Qd8 $6 ({Трудно указать недостатки развивающего хода} 19... Bd7 $1 {. Например:} 20. gxh6 g6 {. Остается} 21. Nc5 ({ В варианте} 21. Qf2 Rac8 22. Qxd4 {благодаря ресурсу} Qb6 $1 {черные отражают матовую угрозу и остаются с большим перевесом.}) 21... Bxc5 22. Qe5 f6 23. Qxc5 Qxc5 24. Rxc5 Kh7 25. Rc7 Rf7 26. Rxb7 Be8 {. Эндшпиль к явной выгоде черных.}) 20. h4 Bd7 21. gxh6 g6 22. h5 Kh8 { Диаграмма} 23. Kh2 $6 ({Лучшее продолжение -} 23. hxg6 $1 fxg6 24. Nc5 {с острой игрой. Характерна оценка этой позиции "Стокфишем": 0.00.}) 23... Bc6 24. Rf3 $2 ({Сильнейшая защита -} 24. Rf2 $1 {. В случае } Bd6 {король защищал себя сам -} 25. Kh3 $1 {. Оценку железного друга легко предугадать... }) 24... Bd6 $2 ({После} 24... Qd5 $1 {могло сказаться то обстоятельство, что ладья перекрыла ферзя, и позиция белых становилась проигранной.}) 25. Qf2 Bc7 26. Kh3 Qe7 {Диаграмма} 27. Ng5 $2 (27. Rg1 $1 { давало равенство. Например:} Rg8 28. Rfg3 Bd7 29. Rxg6 $1 fxg6 30. hxg6 Rxg6 31. Rxg6 {.}) 27... e5 $2 ({Простым (как кажется) ходом} 27... gxh5 $1 {Фабиано мог достичь подавляющего превосходства. Не могу указать за белых ни одной вразумительной попытки остаться в борьбе.}) {Диаграмма Аронян в очередной раз проявляет себя как художник.} 28. Rxc6 $1 bxc6 29. Nxf7+ $1 Rxf7 30. hxg6 Rf6 ({Сильнее грубое} 30... Rxf4 $1 31. Rxf4 exf4 32. Qxd4+ Qe5 33. g7+ Kg8 34. Bc4+ Kh7 35. Qd3+ Kxh6 36. g8=Q Rxg8 37. Bxg8 Qh8 38. Bb3 Kg5+ 39. Kg2 Qxb2+ 40. Bc2 {. Диаграмма Две лишних пешки не гарантируют черным победы при ферзях. А вот чистый разноцвет выигран.} ) 31. g7+ Kg8 {Диаграмма} 32. Bc4+ $2 {Теперь гармония утрачивается безвозвратно.} ({Тихий ход} 32. Qh4 $3 {мог установить гармонию в боевых порядках белых. Вариант} e4 33. h7+ $1 Kxg7 34. Rg3+ Kh8 35. Rg8+ Rxg8 36. hxg8=Q+ Kxg8 37. Bc4+ Kg7 38. Qg5+ Kh7 39. Qg8+ Kh6 40. Qg5+ {кончается вечным шахом.}) 32... Kh7 33. Qh4 e4 34. Rg3 Bxf4 35. g8=Q+ Rxg8 36. Bxg8+ Kh8 37. Rg7 {Диаграмма} Qf8 0-1 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.03.20"] [Round "?"] [White "Grischuk Alexander"] [Black "Kramnik Vladimir "] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D26"] [Annotator "user"] [PlyCount "181"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nf3 c5 5. e3 $5 ({Грищук уклоняется от улучшенной защиты Тарраша, возможной после} 5. cxd5 Nxd5 {, поскольку этот дебют является коронным у экс-чемпиона мира.}) 5... dxc4 6. Bxc4 {Определился дебют - принятый ферзевый гамбит.} a6 {Диаграмма} 7. Bb3 $5 {Довольно редкий ход.} ({Чаще встречалось} 7. O-O {.}) 7... b5 8. e4 $5 ({Снова сюрприз вместо обычного} 8. O-O {.}) 8... cxd4 9. Nxd4 Bb7 {Диаграмма} 10. e5 $1 {А это - новинка.} ({В партии Андрей Малюш - Виктор Купрейчик (Минск 2004, 1/2) было сыграно } 10. O-O {.}) 10... Ne4 ({На} 10... Nfd7 {надо считаться с ударом} 11. Bxe6 $1 {, и в случае} fxe6 12. Nxe6 Qc8 13. O-O { у белых неприятная инициатива.}) 11. O-O ({ Белые могут перейти в лучший эндшпиль. Впрочем, можно понять желание Грищука сохранить более сложный характер борьбы, поскольку доказательство перевеса в окончании требует компьютерной точности.} 11. Nxe4 $5 Bxe4 12. O-O Nc6 13. Nxc6 Qxd1 14. Rxd1 Bxc6 15. Be3 Be7 16. Rac1 Rc8 17. f4 g6 ({в варианте} 17... O-O $2 18. f5 exf5 19. e6 f6 20. Bc5 {белые побеждают}) 18. Rd3 Bb7 ({в случае} 18... O-O 19. Rdc3 Bd7 20. Rc7 Rfd8 21. Bd1 Rxc7 22. Rxc7 Kf8 23. Be2 {оценка та же, что и в главном варианте}) 19. Rxc8+ Bxc8 20. Rc3 Kd7 21. Bb6 Bd8 22. Rd3+ Ke7 23. Bc5+ Ke8 24. Kf2 {. Диаграмма У белых ясный перевес, но удастся ли его реализовать - остается неясным.}) 11... Nxc3 12. bxc3 Nc6 {Диаграмма} 13. a4 $5 {Масштабная игра!} ({ Хочется поскорее создать атаку. Но, например, попытку} 13. Qg4 {парирует типовое} h5 $1 {, и черные в порядке.}) ({В случае} 13. Be3 { занятен кооперативный вариант:} Nxe5 $2 {(в реальности кто ж возьмет эту пешку!)} 14. Qh5 $1 Ng6 15. f4 Qh4 16. Qe2 Be7 17. g3 Qh3 18. f5 exf5 19. Rxf5 O-O 20. Raf1 Bf6 21. Rh5 Qd7 22. Rxf6 gxf6 {Диаграмма} 23. Rxh7 $1 Kxh7 24. Qh5+ Kg7 25. Bh6+ Kg8 26. Qxg6+ Kh8 27. Qg7#) 13... Bc5 $1 {Естественный развивающий ход.} ({На} 13... b4 {белые могут развивать инициативу путем} 14. a5 $1 {.}) 14. axb5 axb5 15. Rxa8 Bxa8 16. Nxb5 {Диаграмма Часто трудно верно оценить и сопоставить вес динамических и материальных факторов. Владимир решает погасить инициативу соперника жертвой пешки.} O-O ({После} 16... Nxe5 $5 {за черных не видно опасностей. Например:} 17. Bf4 Qxd1 18. Rxd1 Ng4 {.}) 17. Qxd8 Rxd8 18. Bf4 {Слабость структуры не дает белым больших оснований реализовать материальный перевес.} h6 19. h4 Ne7 20. Rd1 Rb8 21. Bc4 Bc6 22. Nd4 Be4 23. h5 Nd5 24. Bxd5 Bxd5 25. Be3 Rc8 26. Re1 Bc4 27. Nf3 Ba3 28. Bd4 Bd3 29. Nd2 Bb2 30. Nf1 Rc4 31. Re3 { Диаграмма} Bf5 $2 {Игра черных на победу в такой позиции выглядит безумием.} ({ Вероятно, Крамник не смог оценить, что после} 31... Bxc3 $1 32. Bxc3 Rxc3 {белые не могут использовать связку, ведь на} 33. Kh2 {следует} Rc1 {.}) 32. Ng3 Bh7 33. Kh2 Bc1 34. Re2 Bf4 35. Kh3 Ra4 36. Kg4 Bc1 37. Kf3 Bd3 38. Re1 Bb2 39. Ke3 Bc2 40. Kd2 Bb3 41. Rb1 Ra2 42. Kd3 Ba4 43. Ne4 Ba3 44. Ke3 Bc2 {Диаграмма У белых большие шансы на победу.} 45. Re1 ({Компьютер рекомендует более активное} 45. Rb8+ $1 Kh7 46. g4 $1 {, но и ход Грищука сохраняет преимущество.}) 45... Bb3 46. g4 Bd5 47. Kd3 Be7 48. Rb1 Ra8 49. f4 Bh4 50. Rh1 Bd8 51. Rb1 Bc7 52. Ke3 Kh7 53. Nd6 Kg8 54. Rb5 Bc6 55. Rb4 Bd8 56. Bb6 Bh4 57. Bd4 Bg2 58. Rb2 Bc6 59. Rb6 Bg2 60. Rb2 Bc6 61. Rb3 Bg3 62. c4 Bh2 {Диаграмма После серии маневров Александр идет на штурм.} 63. f5 $1 exf5 ({Черные на грани поражения и после} 63... Bg3 $5 64. Ne4 Bh4 65. Rb6 Ra3+ 66. Nc3 {.}) 64. Nxf5 $2 (64. gxf5 $1 {давало решающий перевес. Возможен вариант:} f6 65. Rb6 Ra3+ 66. Kd2 Bf3 67. Rb8+ Kh7 68. Nf7 Bf4+ 69. Ke1 Ra8 70. Rxa8 Bxa8 71. e6 Kg8 72. Nd8 Kf8 73. Bc5+ Ke8 74. e7 Be4 75. Ne6 {с выигрышем.}) 64... Kh7 65. Bb2 Re8 66. Nd6 Re7 67. Rb8 {Диаграмма} f6 $6 ({Простым} 67... Bxe5 $1 68. Bxe5 Rxe5+ 69. Kd4 f6 70. Nf7 Re8 {черные уверенно достигали мирной гавани.}) 68. Rc8 Bh1 $2 ({После} 68... Bd7 $1 69. Rc7 fxe5 {белые вновь не могут использовать связку, как и в варианте на 31 ходу. Например:} 70. c5 e4 71. c6 Bg1+ 72. Kf4 Bh2+ {с ничьей.}) 69. Nf5 Rb7 {Диаграмма} 70. exf6 $2 ({ Выигрывает} 70. e6 $1 Rb3+ 71. Bc3 $1 Rxc3+ 72. Kd2 $1 {.} ({А вот в случае} 72. Kd4 $2 Rb3 73. e7 $4 {партия заканчивается в пользу черных:} Bg1+ 74. Ne3 Bxe3#)) 70... Rb3+ 71. Bc3 gxf6 72. Kd2 Bf4+ 73. Kc2 Rb8 74. Rxb8 Bxb8 75. Ne7 Be4+ ({ Четкий путь к ничьей -} 75... Bf3 $1 {, и после} 76. Nd5 {на выбор:} Be5 ({или} 76... Kg7 77. Nxf6 Kf7 78. g5 hxg5 79. h6 Bf4 80. h7 Kg7 {.}) 77. Bxe5 fxe5 78. Kd3 Kg7 79. Ne3 Kf6) 76. Kd2 { Диаграмма} Bf4+ $4 {Решающая ошибка.} ({Вело к ничьей} 76... Bf3 $1 77. Nd5 Kg7 78. Nxf6 Bf4+ 79. Kd3 Kf7 {.}) 77. Ke2 { Пешка g4 в безопасности, и черные обречены.} Kg7 78. Nf5+ $1 Kf7 79. Bd2 Be5 80. Bxh6 Ke6 81. Be3 Bxf5 82. gxf5+ Kxf5 83. h6 Kg6 84. c5 f5 85. Kf3 Kf7 86. Bf4 Bd4 87. c6 Ke7 88. c7 Kd7 89. h7 { Диаграмма Пешка с оттягивает на себя короля соперника, а пешка h проходит. Решает перекрытие слоном на е5.} Kc8 90. Ke2 Kd7 91. Kd3 1-0 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.03.20"] [Round "?"] [White "Ding Liren "] [Black "Aronian Levon "] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E04"] [Annotator "user"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 Nf6 2. g3 e6 3. Bg2 d5 4. Nf3 dxc4 5. Qa4+ Bd7 6. Qxc4 c5 7. d4 ({ Поединок Аронян - Дин Лижэнь (Кубок Мира, Тбилиси 2017, 1/2) продолжался} 7. Ne5 Qc8 {.}) 7... Bc6 8. dxc5 Nbd7 9. Be3 Bd5 10. Qc2 Be4 11. Qc1 {Диаграмма} Ng4 { Новинка.} ({Надежнее игра на уравнение:} 11... Bxc5 12. Bxc5 Rc8 13. b4 b6 {и т.д.}) 12. b4 a5 13. Bg5 f6 { Диаграмма} 14. Bd2 ({К небезвыгодным для белых осложнениям ведет} 14. Nc3 $5 {. Возможны следующие продолжения. Острее} Bf5 $5 ({В случае} 14... Bxf3 15. Bxf3 axb4 16. Bxg4 bxc3 17. Be3 Bxc5 18. O-O { у белых приятнее.}) 15. Bf4 axb4 16. Nb5 {. Здесь варианты снова разветвляются. Один из них -} Rc8 ({Другая возможность -} 16... e5 17. Nfd4 exd4 18. Nxd4 g6 19. Nxf5 gxf5 20. c6 bxc6 21. Qxc6 {с атакой за фигуру.}) 17. Nd6+ Bxd6 18. Bxd6 Nxc5 19. Bxc5 b6 20. Bxb4 Rxc1+ 21. Rxc1 {. За ферзя у белых ладья, слон и инициатива.}) 14... axb4 15. Bxb4 Nxc5 16. Bxc5 {Диаграмма} Rc8 $6 {Левон вызывает осложнения, в которых Лижэнь оказывается на высоте.} ({Верный путь -} 16... Qa5+ $1 17. Nbd2 Bxc5 18. O-O Bd5 {с равновесием, хотя возможно острое продолжение:} 19. e4 Nxf2 20. Rxf2 Bxf2+ 21. Kxf2 Qb6+ ({ "Стокфиш" упрямо лезет под связку -} 21... Bxa2) 22. Kf1 Bc6 {.}) 17. Qc4 Bxc5 18. Qxe6+ Kf8 19. Qxg4 Bb4+ 20. Nbd2 Bxd2+ 21. Nxd2 Bxg2 22. Rg1 Bd5 23. Rd1 Qc7 24. Ne4 Rd8 25. f3 {Диаграмма} Qe5 $6 ({ Продолжение} 25... Qb6 $1 26. Kf1 Kf7 27. Kg2 Qe3 28. Rge1 Bxe4 { давало хорошие шансы на ничью.}) 26. Qf4 $1 Qxf4 27. gxf4 Kf7 28. Nc3 Bc4 {Диаграмма} 29. a4 ({Стоило предпочесть} 29. Kf2) ({или} 29. Rb1 {с большим перевесом.}) 29... Rxd1+ 30. Kxd1 Rd8+ 31. Kc2 Rc8 32. Kd2 Ba6 33. Ne4 Kf8 {Диаграмма} 34. f5 $2 {Ведет к потере лишней пешки.} (34. Ra1 $1 {давало шансы ее реализовать.} ) 34... Rd8+ $1 35. Ke3 Rd5 36. Rc1 $6 ({Еще можно было бороться за победу путем} 36. Ng3 $1 Ra5 37. Rc1 $1 { , но черные способны устоять после} Rxa4 38. Rc8+ Kf7 39. Rc7+ Kg8 $1 40. Nh5 Rh4 41. Nxg7 Rxh2 42. Kf4 Bxe2 43. Ne8 Rh6 {.}) 36... Rxf5 37. Rc8+ Ke7 38. Rc7+ Kf8 39. Rc8+ Ke7 40. Rc7+ Kf8 41. Rc8+ 1/2-1/2 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.03.20"] [Round "?"] [White "So Wesley "] [Black "Caruana Fabiano "] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C42"] [Annotator "user"] [PlyCount "129"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. Qe2 {Диаграмма Безобидный вариант русской партии, но, как известно, в тихом омуте черти водятся.} Qe7 6. d3 Nf6 7. Nc3 Qxe2+ 8. Bxe2 g6 9. Bg5 Bg7 10. O-O-O O-O 11. Rhe1 { Диаграмма Позиция за внешней простотой скрывает глубокие нюансы. Черные уже играют на перехват.} h6 $1 {Фабиано "спросил фамилию" у слона.} 12. Bh4 ({После размена слона перспективы черных выше -} 12. Bxf6 Bxf6 13. Nd5 Bd8 {.}) 12... Nc6 13. d4 a6 ({Интересно} 13... g5 $5 {.}) {Диаграмма} 14. a3 $6 {Потеря времени.} ({Видимо, настал подходящий момент для размена слона:} 14. Bxf6 $1 Bxf6 15. Nd5 Bd8 16. c3 {. В случае} Be6 {белые решают позиционные проблемы тактическим путем:} 17. Nxc7 $1 Bxc7 18. d5 {с равенством.}) 14... Bd7 ({Снова давало шансы на перевес} 14... g5 $5 15. Bg3 Re8 {.}) { Диаграмма} 15. d5 $6 {Внешняя агрессия приводит к возникновению слабости, поскольку пехотинец отрывается от коллектива.} ({Видимо, размен слона был лучшим решением, хотя после} 15. Bxf6 $1 Bxf6 16. Nd5 Bd8 {от белых требуется точность для удержания равновесия.}) 15... Na7 16. Nd4 Nc8 17. Nb3 g5 18. Bg3 Re8 19. Na5 b5 20. f3 Nh5 21. Bf2 Nf4 22. Bf1 {Диаграмма} Nb6 ({ Фабиано мог выиграть пешку путем} 22... Rxe1 $1 23. Bxe1 Bxc3 24. Bxc3 Nb6 {, что, вероятно, было лучшей возможностью.}) 23. Rxe8+ Rxe8 24. Bxb6 cxb6 {Диаграмма} 25. Nb7 $5 {Впечатляющее решение, которому Уэсли обязан спасением партии.} ({ Альтернатива -} 25. Nc6 {. У черных есть несколько перспективных возможностей, но сумеют ли они победить - вопрос открытый. Например:} f5 $5 26. g3 Nxd5 27. Rxd5 Bxc6 28. Rxd6 Bxf3 {с перевесом.}) 25... Be5 26. Ne4 Rb8 {После хода в партии Со спасается единственными ходами.} ({Зная результат, можно предложить} 26... g4 $5 {.} ) 27. Nexd6 Ng6 28. g3 Ne7 {Диаграмма} 29. a4 $3 Nf5 30. Nxf5 Bxf5 31. Re1 f6 {Диаграмма} 32. Rxe5 {Жертва качества вынуждена, но достаточна для ничьей.} fxe5 33. Nd6 Bd7 34. axb5 axb5 35. Bxb5 Bxb5 36. Nxb5 Rf8 37. Kd2 Rxf3 38. Ke2 g4 39. Nd6 h5 40. Nc4 {Диаграмма} b5 $1 {Каруана ставит проблемы, но Со блестяще их решает.} 41. Nxe5 Rf5 42. Ng6 Kf7 43. Nf4 h4 $1 44. Ng2 $1 hxg3 45. hxg3 Rf3 46. Ne3 Rxg3 { Диаграмма} 47. c4 $1 bxc4 48. d6 $5 ({Спасало и} 48. Nxc4 Kf6 49. d6 Rb3 50. d7 $1 {.}) 48... Ke6 49. Nxc4 Rf3 {Диаграмма} 50. d7 $1 Rf8 51. Ne3 g3 52. d8=Q {Благодаря отвлечению ладьи белый король получает возможность подойти к проходной.} Rxd8 53. Kf3 Rd3 54. Kf4 Rb3 55. Ng2 Kd5 56. Nh4 Kc4 57. Kg4 Rd3 58. b4 Rb3 59. b5 Kd5 60. b6 Ke4 {Диаграмма} 61. b7 $1 Rxb7 62. Kxg3 {Материальное соотношение теоретически ничейно. Фабиано не стал проверять соперника.} Rg7+ 63. Kf2 Rg4 64. Ng2 Rxg2+ 65. Kxg2 1/2-1/2 [Event "Berlin GER"] [Site "Berlin GER"] [Date "2018.03.24"] [Round "12"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Ding, Liren"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D41"] [WhiteElo "2809"] [BlackElo "2769"] [PlyCount "86"] [EventDate "2018.03.10"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 c5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Nxc3 7. bxc3 cxd4 8. cxd4 Bb4+ 9. Bd2 Bxd2+ 10. Qxd2 O-O 11. Bc4 Nd7 12. O-O b6 13. Rad1 Bb7 14. Rfe1 Rc8 15. Bb3 Re8 16. h3 (16. Re3 Nf6 17. Qd3 b5 18. d5 exd5 19. e5 Ne4 20. Qxb5 Qb6 21. Qxb6 axb6 {So,W (2788)-Dominguez Perez,L (2739) Saint Louis 2017}) 16... Nf6 17. Qf4 Nh5 $146 (17... Qc7 18. Qh4 h6 19. Re3 b5 20. Ne5 a5 21. a4 bxa4 22. Bxa4 Red8 {Epishin,V (2574)-Del Rio de Angelis,S (2489) Calvia 2005}) 18. Qh2 h6 19. Ne5 (19. d5 exd5 20. exd5 Rxe1+ 21. Nxe1 Qf6 22. Nd3 Ba6 23. Qe5 Bxd3 24. Qxh5 Bc2 {So,W (2799)-Kramnik,V (2800) Berlin GER 2018}) 19... Nf6 20. Qf4 b5 21. Re3 (21. Nxf7 Kxf7 22. e5 a5 23. exf6 Qxf6 {is just equal.}) 21... Rc7 22. Nd3 Rc3 23. Nc5 Rxe3 24. Qxe3 {After this trade Ding felt quite comfortable.} (24. fxe3 Bc6 25. d5 e5 {Ding}) 24... Bc6 25. Rc1 Qb6 26. f3 Rd8 27. Kf2 a5 28. g4 a4 29. Bc2 (29. Bd1 $5 Qb8 30. Kg2 Qd6 {Mamedyarov} 31. Be2 $1 Qxd4 32. Qxd4 Rxd4 33. Nxe6) 29... Nd7 {Here Ding thought Black is already better.} 30. Bd3 Nxc5 31. Rxc5 b4 32. Bc4 Bd7 33. g5 hxg5 34. Qxg5 Be8 35. Qe7 b3 $1 36. axb3 a3 $1 {Missed by Mamedyarov.} 37. b4 Ra8 38. d5 {Ding had missed this, and said he was lucky he had 43...Qa7+.} a2 39. dxe6 a1=Q 40. exf7+ Bxf7 41. Bxf7+ Kh7 42. Qh4+ Qh6 43. Rh5 Qa7+ $1 (43... Qd4+ $2 44. Kg2 { is a draw in fact.}) 0-1 [Event "World Chess Candidates 2018"] [Site "Berlin"] [Date "2018.03.24"] [Round "12"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Ding, Liren"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D41"] [WhiteElo "2809"] [BlackElo "2769"] [Annotator "AlexYermo"] [PlyCount "86"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 c5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Nxc3 7. bxc3 cxd4 8. cxd4 Bb4+ 9. Bd2 Bxd2+ 10. Qxd2 O-O 11. Bc4 Nd7 12. O-O b6 13. Rad1 Bb7 14. Rfe1 Rc8 15. Bb3 Re8 16. h3 Nf6 17. Qf4 Nh5 {This move was seen earlier in the tournament in So-Kramnik, played in Round 5.} 18. Qh2 h6 19. Ne5 ({Wesley was unable to get anything going after} 19. d5 exd5 20. exd5 Rxe1+ 21. Nxe1 Qf6 22. Nd3 Ba6 $1) 19... Nf6 20. Qf4 b5 {[#]} 21. Re3 ({White had an interesting possibility in} 21. Nxf7 Kxf7 22. e5 {hoping for} Qc7 $2 ({I'm sure both players saw} 22... a5 23. exf6 Qxf6 24. Qd6 Rc6 25. Qa3 a4 26. d5 Ra6 27. dxe6+ Kg8 28. Bc2 Raxe6 $11) 23. Rc1 Qb8 24. Rxc8 {where Black has no good recapture: } Bxc8 (24... Rxc8 25. Bxe6+ Kxe6 26. exf6+ Kf7 27. Re7+ Kf8 28. Qe3 $18) 25. Qf5 $3 Kf8 26. exf6 exf5 27. Rxe8+ Kxe8 28. fxg7 $18) ({Another plan was the standard} 21. d5 $5 exd5 22. exd5 Qd6 23. Qd4 a5 24. a4 b4 25. Re3) 21... Rc7 22. Nd3 {Shakh appears to be a bit indecisive.} (22. d5 exd5 23. exd5 Qd6 24. Qg3 Rd8 25. Ng4 Qxg3 26. Nxf6+ gxf6 27. Rxg3+ Kf8 28. d6 Rc6 29. Rgd3 a5 $14) 22... Rc3 $1 {A rook trade will come as big relief for Black's position.} 23. Nc5 Rxe3 24. Qxe3 Bc6 25. Rc1 Qb6 26. f3 Rd8 27. Kf2 a5 28. g4 ({The last chance to change the course of the game was represented by} 28. Nxe6 $5 fxe6 29. Bxe6+ Kf8 30. d5 Qxe3+ 31. Kxe3 Bd7 ({A rather unclear situation arises after} 31... Bxd5 32. Rd1 Bxe6 33. Rxd8+ Ke7 34. Ra8 a4 35. a3 g5) 32. Bxd7 Nxd7 33. Rc7 Ke8 34. Kd4 b4 35. Ra7 {Honestly, White doesn't have much in either line, but this is more like Mamedyarov's chess than the sit-and-wait policy he adopted in the game continuation.}) 28... a4 29. Bc2 Nd7 30. Bd3 (30. Nd3 Nf6 31. Bb1) 30... Nxc5 31. Rxc5 b4 $15 {[#] I guess around these parts Shakh came to realize his position was gradually getting worse.} 32. Bc4 $2 { This active attempt only puts White on the brink of disaster.} ({Instead, he could have held on with} 32. h4 b3 33. axb3 axb3 34. Bb1 Be8 35. Qc3 b2 36. e5 Rb8 37. h5 {It's not clear how Black makes progress from this point on.}) 32... Bd7 33. g5 (33. e5 b3 34. axb3 a3 35. Qd2 Ra8 36. b4) 33... hxg5 34. Qxg5 Be8 35. Qe7 $2 {This loses.} (35. Qe3 $142) 35... b3 $1 {Ding has let his chances slip away in some games, but this time he stays focused and brings home his first victory.} 36. axb3 a3 37. b4 (37. Qc7 Qxc7 38. Rxc7 Ra8 $19) 37... Ra8 38. d5 (38. Ba2 Qxb4) 38... a2 {[#]} 39. dxe6 {There will be no miracles as White's Rc5 remains pinned and is unable to join the attack.} ({However, there was no salvation in} 39. Bxa2 Rxa2+ 40. Kg3 Qxb4 41. Qxe8+ Kh7 42. Qxf7 (42. Rc8 Qd2 $1) 42... Qxc5 43. Qh5+ Kg8 44. Qe8+ Qf8 45. Qxe6+ Kh7 $19) 39... a1=Q 40. exf7+ Bxf7 41. Bxf7+ Kh7 42. Qh4+ Qh6 43. Rh5 Qa7+ 0-1 [Event "EU-chT (Men) 21st"] [Site "Heraklio"] [Date "2017.11.05"] [Round "8.2"] [White "Radjabov, Teimour"] [Black "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A35"] [WhiteElo "2741"] [BlackElo "2733"] [Annotator "Marin,M"] [PlyCount "87"] [EventDate "2017.10.28"] [EventType "team-swiss"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "GRE"] [SourceTitle "CBM 182"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2018.01.17"] [SourceVersion "1"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.01.17"] [SourceQuality "1"] [WhiteTeam "Azerbaijan"] [BlackTeam "Russia"] [WhiteTeamCountry "AZE"] [BlackTeamCountry "RUS"] 1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 g6 4. e3 Nf6 5. d4 cxd4 6. exd4 d5 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Qb3 {I analysed this line in my Modern Trends - Symmetrical English article in CBM180. For this reason I will not comment again on the initial phase of the game.} e6 9. Bb5 Bg7 10. Bxc6+ bxc6 11. O-O O-O 12. Na4 Qd6 13. Re1 Rb8 14. Qd3 c5 15. Nxc5 Nb4 16. Qc3 Bb7 17. a3 (17. Ne5 Qd5 18. Nxb7 Rxb7 19. b3 Rbb8 $44 { ½-½ (38) Matlakov,M (2707)-Wei,Y (2728) Khanty-Mansiysk 2017 CBM 179 [CBM 180 EO symmetrical]}) 17... Nd5 18. Qd3 Ba8 ({In my initial comments I attached to this move a "?" writing: Wasting an important tempo.} 18... Ne7 19. b4 Nf5 $44 {was better. But the novelty below proves I was wrong.}) 19. b4 Rbc8 $1 $146 {You may forgive me for not taking this move seriously in my initial comments. What is Black doing? Placing a rook on a well defended file? But the idea is very deep. First of all, the rook moves out of the enemy bishop's range, preventing White from winning an important tempo in certain lines. Secondly, White frequently plays Ne4 to help his development in one way or another, and then the control of the c-file will be important, allowing Black to play for ...Qc2.} (19... Ne7 {Harutyunian,T (2515)-Vakhidov,J (2561) Moscow 2017 (1/2-1/2, 60)} 20. Ne4 $1 Qb6 21. Bg5 f6 22. Bf4 $14) (19... Rbd8 20. Ne4 Qb6 21. Bg5 f6 22. Bd2 $14) 20. Ne5 {Here are a couple of altenatives illustrating the previous comment:} (20. Ne4 Qc6 21. Bd2 Qc2 $44) (20. Bd2 Ne7 21. Ne4 Qd5 22. Bg5 f6 23. Bd2 (23. Bf4 {does not attack a rook anymore and can be also met with} g5) 23... g5 24. h3 h5 $132) 20... Ne7 $44 {The start of the standard regrouping, increasing the pressure on the d4-pawn. White's extra pawn is not too relevant yet and Black's bishops are both very strong. The positon is basically equal.} 21. Bb2 Nf5 22. Rad1 Rfd8 23. Qe2 Qe7 24. Ne4 { As we will see, White's main plan is advancing his queenside pawns, as in the rest of the board it is hard to display activity. But why then did White retreat with his knight?} ({One possible answer is that} 24. b5 $2 {leaves the c5-kight slightly hanging:} Nh4 25. f3 Bxe5 26. Qxe5 {Unfortunately forced.} Rd5 27. Qe3 Rg5 $19) ({White could also try regrouping as in the game with his knight on c5, but the hanging issue would always be there.} 24. f3 Rd5 25. Qf2 h5 26. Rd2 Rcd8 27. Red1 a5 $5 28. Bc3 axb4 29. axb4 Nd6 $44 {[%cal Gd6b5]}) 24... Qh4 25. f3 {For now this looks like a solid move but later it will turn into a weakness.} (25. g3 Qxe4 26. Qxe4 Bxe4 27. Rxe4 Rc2 $44) 25... Rd5 26. a4 {Finally the plan.} (26. Nxf7 {leads to unclear consequences.} Kxf7 27. Ng5+ Qxg5 28. Qxe6+ Kf8 29. Qxc8+ Rd8 $13) ({But} 26. f4 $5 {deserves atention. As shown below the pawn is not too tasty and White may grab space with g2-g4 soon. } Rcd8 (26... Qxf4 $6 27. g3 Qh6 28. Ng4 Qh3 29. Ngf6+ Bxf6 30. Nxf6+ Kg7 31. Nxd5 Bxd5 32. Rc1 $14 {with insufficient compensation for the exchange.}) 27. Qf2 a5 $5 ({Retrieving the pawn leads to an unpleasant endgame almost by force: } 27... Qxf2+ 28. Kxf2 Nxd4 29. Ng4 Rf5 30. g3 h5 31. Nh6+ Bxh6 32. Rxd4 Rxd4 33. Bxd4 Bxe4 34. Rxe4 $14) (27... Qe7 28. Rd2 {and White still keeps his extra pawn although it is not clear how he would make progress.}) 28. g4 Bxe5 29. Qxh4 Nxh4 30. fxe5 Nf3+ (30... Rb5 31. Kf2 axb4 32. a4 Ra5 33. Bc1 $14 { Black faces some problems of coordination, but the position remains not clear.} ) 31. Kf2 Nxe1 32. Nf6+ Kg7 33. Nxd5 Bxd5 34. Rxe1 $14 {White's advantage looks rather symbolic, due to opposite coloured bishops.}) 26... h6 {A mysterious move, proving that Black is confident. He clears the h7-square for the king and prepares a later ...g6-g5.} ({But there is nothing against the immediate} 26... Qd8) 27. b5 Qd8 28. Rc1 ({The central pawn is lost as} 28. Qf2 $2 {drops a piece to} Bxe5) 28... Rxc1 29. Rxc1 Nxd4 30. Bxd4 Rxd4 31. Nc6 { White has finally managed to neutralise one of the bishops.} Bxc6 {Not really necesary but not wrong either.} (31... Qc7 32. Qc2 (32. Rc4 Rd5 {[%cal Ga7a6]}) 32... Rd5 {and Black is at least fine, as White cannot display much activity.}) 32. bxc6 Be5 33. Qc2 Qc7 $6 $14 {"The queen is a bad blocker!" Of course Nepomniachtchi knew that, but the temptation to provoke g2-g3 was probably too strong. But actually g2-g3 is a useful move, ensuring the king some breathing space and restricting the bishop.} ({AFter} 33... Bc7 $1 {the most constructive move seems to be} 34. g3 {anyway, when Black is absolutely stable and can choose whether to sit and wait or display some activity.} f5 (34... g5 $11) (34... Kg7 $11) 35. Nc5 (35. Nf2 Rd2 $36) 35... Qd5 $132) 34. g3 Rb4 35. Kh1 Kg7 36. Qd1 {Possibly not the strongest but from a practical point of view brilliant as it caused an immediate blunder. Black was probably scared by the threat Qd7, which is not so terrible actually.} (36. Nf2 $5 Bd4 37. Nd3 Rb8 38. Qc4 Rd8 39. Kg2 $14) 36... Bd4 $2 {Optically logical but losing.} (36... Rd4 37. Qb3 Qd8 $5 $132 38. Nc5 {This allows an unexpected drawing combination.} Bxg3 39. hxg3 Rh4+ 40. gxh4 Qxh4+ 41. Kg2 Qg5+ 42. Kf2 Qd2+ {with a perpetual.} ) (36... a5 37. Kg2 $5 {The king is heading for the relatively safest h3.} (37. Qd7 {is not too dangerous.} Qxd7 38. cxd7 Rd4 39. Rc5 Bf6 40. Rc8 Be7 (40... Rxd7 $4 41. Rg8+ $1) 41. Nc5 Rd5) 37... Rb6 38. Qd7 g5 39. Kh3 {[%cal Gc1c5]} Rb4 40. Rc5 g4+ $5 (40... Rxa4 41. Qxc7 Bxc7 42. Nc3 Rb4 43. Nb5 Bb6 44. Nd6 ( 44. c7 Rxb5) 44... Rd4 45. c7 Bxc7 46. Ne8+ Kg6 47. Nxc7 a4 {wih drawing chances due to the weakened kingside.}) 41. Kxg4 Rxa4 {The knight is pinned now.} 42. Kh3 Rd4 43. Qxc7 Bxc7 44. Nc3 Rd8 45. Nb5 Rc8 46. Kg4 $14) 37. Nd6 $1 $18 {The double threat Ne8+ and Nb5 wins.} Kh7 38. Nb5 Rxb5 39. axb5 e5 40. Qb3 Kg7 41. Qd5 Be3 42. Rd1 Qb8 43. Re1 Bd4 44. f4 1-0 [Event "EU-chT (Men) 21st"] [Site "Heraklio"] [Date "2017.11.05"] [Round "8.4"] [White "Mamedov, Rauf"] [Black "Dubov, Daniil"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B31"] [WhiteElo "2678"] [BlackElo "2677"] [Annotator "Stohl,I"] [PlyCount "115"] [EventDate "2017.10.28"] [EventType "team-swiss"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "GRE"] [SourceTitle "CBM 182"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2018.01.17"] [SourceVersion "1"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.01.17"] [SourceQuality "1"] [WhiteTeam "Azerbaijan"] [BlackTeam "Russia"] [WhiteTeamCountry "AZE"] [BlackTeamCountry "RUS"] {[%mdl 2] The penultimate round featured the crucial match for the European team gold between Russia and Azerbaijan. The Azeris decided the sharp struggle with no draws in their favour, thus overtaking the main pre-tournament favourites. The following exciting game was one of the highlights of the whole tournament, with Mamedov (8p./9) proving his worth as the most valuable player in his team.} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. O-O ({While this is certainly one of the two main moves, the almost ubiquitous continuation in the past years has been} 4. Bxc6 bxc6 {became the rage in 2016-7:} (4... dxc6 {is less popular, but this is mainly due to a shift in opinion/fashion. In 2015 taking with the d-pawn was still in vogue and can hardly be considered refuted even nowadays:} 5. d3 Bg7 6. h3 Nf6 7. Nc3 O-O 8. Bf4 Nh5 $5 (8... b6 9. Qd2 Re8 10. O-O-O $5 a5 (10... b5 $5 {/\} 11. Ne5 Qa5 $13 {is possibly stronger}) 11. Ne5 b5 12. Qe3 {[%cal Yf4h6]} (12. Bh6 $2 Nxe4 $1) 12... Qb6 $2 (12... Nd7 $142 $1 {Radjabov} 13. Ng4 (13. Nxd7 Bd4) 13... Nb6 $1 14. Ne2 b4 15. Bh6 Bh8 $132) 13. Bh6 Bh8 14. f4 a4 ({After} 14... Nd7 15. Nxd7 Bxd7 16. e5 $16) 15. Rhf1 e6 ( 15... b4 16. Ne2 b3 17. cxb3 a3 18. bxa3 Rxa3 19. Rd2 Be6 20. Kd1 $1 $16 { /\Nc1 and Black's compensation is insufficient.}) 16. g4 a3 17. b4 $1 Nd7 18. Nxd7 Bxd7 19. e5 {[%cal Rc3e4]} f5 $8 20. Ne2 Bg7 21. Bxg7 Kxg7 22. h4 $1 fxg4 23. h5 gxh5 24. Ng3 Kh8 25. Nxh5 Re7 26. Nf6 Be8 27. f5 $40 {Caruana,F (2804) -Radjabov,T (2726) Shamkir 2016/ For more details see the notes to this game in CBM 173 by Kr. Szabo.}) (8... Nd7 9. Qd2 e5 10. Bh6 Qe7 11. Bxg7 Kxg7 12. O-O-O a5 13. a4 $5 Rd8 14. h4 f6 15. Qe3 Nf8 16. Rdg1 Bg4 17. Nh2 Be6 18. g4 c4 19. dxc4 Bxc4 20. g5 h5 21. gxh6+ Kh7 22. f4 exf4 23. Qxf4 Nd7 24. Rxg6 $1 $18 {Brkic,A (2585)-Stany,G (2476) Biel 2016}) 9. Bh2 $5 (9. Be3 Qd6 10. Qd2 e5 11. O-O-O (11. Ne2 f5 $13) 11... b5 12. Ne2 b4 13. g4 Nf6 14. Ng3 a5 15. c4 a4 16. Rhg1 Kh8 17. Bh6 Ne8 18. Bxg7+ Kxg7 $15 19. Nf5+ $2 gxf5 20. gxf5+ Kh8 21. Qg5 Ra7 22. Rg4 f6 23. Qh6 Rff7 $19 {Vallejo Pons,F (2710)-Radjabov,T (2710) Moscow 2017}) 9... Bh6 10. Ne5 f6 11. Ng4 Bg7 12. Qd2 e5 13. O-O-O a5 14. Ne2 a4 15. Kb1 {Adams,M (2751)-Eljanov,P (2759) Sharjah 2017} Kh8 (15... b5 $132) 16. Ne3 Bh6 17. Qc3 Qe7 18. Rhf1 Bg7 19. Qd2 f5 $6 (19... b5 20. g4 Nf4 $44) 20. exf5 a3 21. b3 gxf5 22. g4 fxg4 23. hxg4 Nf6 24. f3 $16 {Adams,M (2751) -Eljanov,P (2759) Sharjah 2017}) 5. O-O Bg7 6. Re1 (6. h3 {is an attempt to forego the rook move:} Nh6 7. c3 O-O 8. d4 cxd4 9. cxd4 f5 10. e5 Nf7 11. Ng5 e6 12. Nxf7 Rxf7 13. Re1 Bf8 14. Nc3 Bb7 15. a3 a5 16. b3 Qh4 17. Ra2 c5 $1 18. Rd2 Bh6 19. Rc2 Bxc1 20. Rxc1 Qxd4 21. Qxd4 cxd4 22. Nb5 Bd5 23. Nxd4 g5 $132 { Bologan,V (2615)-Gelfand,B (2737) Heraklio 2017}) {However, definitely the main move is} 6... Nh6 ({Kasparov has been successfully experimenting with} 6... Nf6 7. e5 Nd5 8. c4 Nc7 9. d4 cxd4 10. Qxd4 Ne6 11. Qh4 d6 $1 12. exd6 ( 12. Bh6 Bxe5 13. Nxe5 dxe5 $15) (12. Nc3 dxe5 13. Nxe5 Qd6 14. Nf3 {is only a transposition.}) 12... Qxd6 13. Nc3 h5 $5 (13... h6 14. Be3 g5 $5 (14... Bf6 $2 15. Ne4 $1 Bxh4 16. Nxd6+ exd6 17. Nxh4 Kd7 18. f4 Ba6 19. b3 g5 20. fxg5 hxg5 21. Nf5 d5 22. Rad1 $16 {Naiditsch,A (2705)-Bu,X (2693) Danzhou 2014}) 15. Qe4 O-O 16. Qc2 f5 17. Rad1 Qc7 18. Nd4 (18. Na4 $5 $14 {is an engine suggestion, but a human player would be worried about Black's advancing pawn phalanx.}) 18... Nxd4 19. Bxd4 e5 20. Bc5 Re8 21. Bd6 Qf7 22. c5 e4 23. Ne2 Ba6 $36 { [%csl Ga6,Gg7] Caruana,F (2795)-Kasparov,G (2812) Saint Louis blitz 2016}) 14. Bd2 O-O 15. Ne4 Qc7 16. Bc3 f6 17. Qg3 Qxg3 18. hxg3 Rd8 19. Ba5 Rd3 20. Rad1 Rxd1 21. Rxd1 Kf7 22. Nd4 Nxd4 23. Rxd4 Be6 24. b3 Bf8 $11 {Anand,V (2783) -Kasparov,G (2812) Saint Louis blitz 2017}) ({Even the rare} 6... d6 {is playable:} 7. e5 (7. c3 Bg4 8. h3 Bxf3 9. Qxf3 e5 10. a3 Ne7 11. b4 {Carlsen,M (2848)-Polgar,J (2705) Mexico City rpd 2012} c4 $5 $11) 7... dxe5 8. Nxe5 Qc7 9. d4 (9. Nc4 $5) 9... cxd4 10. Qxd4 Nf6 11. Nc3 Be6 12. Qc5 Rc8 13. Bf4 Qb7 14. Na4 O-O 15. Qa3 Qa6 16. Nd3 Bf5 17. Ndc5 Qc4 18. Be5 Rfd8 19. c3 Rd2 20. Qb4 Qxb4 21. cxb4 Rcd8 22. Bc3 Rc2 $132 {Caruana,F (2795)-Kamsky,G (2678) Saint Louis 2016}) 7. c3 O-O {and now:} {Currently the prophylactic} 8. h3 { is all the rage:} (8. d4 cxd4 9. cxd4 {is the older continuation.} {Later he came up with the more direct} d5 $5 ({Black used to play the restrained and rather passive} 9... f6 10. Nc3 d6 11. h3 Nf7 12. Be3 {[%csl Gd4,Ge4]} (12. b3 $14) {White has more space and Black's ^^ have to wait for a chance to show their strength:} 12... Bd7 13. Rc1 Rb8 14. b3 Qa5 15. Nd2 Qa6 16. Nc4 f5 17. e5 Be6 18. exd6 exd6 19. d5 cxd5 20. Nxd5 Bxd5 21. Qxd5 Qxa2 {Kulaots,K (2566) -Moiseenko,A (2663) Gjakova 2016} 22. Bf4 $16) 10. e5 f6 {[%csl Rc6,Gc8,Gg7] While this saddles him with a weakness on c6, it gives the ^^ more scope:} 11. exf6 (11. Nbd2 fxe5 12. Nxe5 Bxe5 13. dxe5 Qb6 14. Nf3 Nf5 15. Bg5 Be6 16. Qd2 c5 17. Rac1 d4 18. b3 Rac8 19. Bh6 Rf7 20. Bf4 Bd5 21. Ng5 Rg7 22. Qd3 h6 23. Ne4 g5 24. Bd2 Nh4 $132 {Areshchenko,A (2672)-Wei,Y (2734) Baku 2015}) (11. h3 fxe5 $5 12. Nxe5 Qb6 13. Bxh6 Bxh6 14. Qc2 Bf5 $6 (14... Rb8 $5 15. Nxc6 Qxb2 $44) 15. Qc3 Rac8 16. b4 a5 17. a3 axb4 18. axb4 Rc7 19. Nd2 Rb8 20. Ra4 Qb5 21. Rea1 Qe2 22. Nb3 Bf4 23. Nc5 $16 {Naumann,A (2562)-Yankelevich,L (2440) Austria 2017}) 11... exf6 (11... Rxf6 $6 {is antipositional, White was on top after} 12. Bg5 Rf7 13. Nbd2 Qb6 14. Nb3 a5 15. Rc1 Nf5 16. Rc2 a4 17. Nc5 Nd6 18. Ne5 $36 {Inarkiev,E (2660)-Durarbayli,V (2618) Skopje 2015}) 12. Nbd2 (12. b3 Re8 13. Rxe8+ Qxe8 14. Ba3 g5 15. Nc3 Nf5 16. Bc5 g4 17. Ne1 h5 18. Nd3 Bh6 19. a4 Bd7 20. g3 Bg5 21. Ne2 Qe4 22. Nc3 {½, Ponomariov,R (2710)-Hamdouchi,H (2597) Doha 2015}) (12. h3 Nf7 13. Nc3 Re8 14. Bf4 g5 15. Bg3 g4 16. hxg4 Bxg4 17. Qd3 Qd7 18. Nh4 Rxe1+ 19. Rxe1 Re8 20. Rxe8+ Qxe8 21. Nf5 Bxf5 22. Qxf5 Nh6 23. Qf4 Qe1+ {½, Kauppila,O (2315)-Yrjola,J (2336) Finland 2016} 24. Kh2 Bf8 25. f3 Qe6 $11) 12... Re8 (12... g5 13. Nb3 Re8 14. Bd2 Bg4 15. h3 Bh5 16. Rc1 Qd7 17. Na5 Rxe1+ 18. Bxe1 Rc8 19. Qd3 Bf8 20. Nd2 Re8 21. Ndb3 Nf7 22. Bd2 Nd8 23. Qc3 Re2 24. Be3 g4 $1 $132 {Gharamian,T (2660)-Naiditsch,A (2684) Germany 2016}) 13. Nb3 Nf7 $146 (13... Bg4 14. Bd2 Nf5 15. h3 Rxe1+ 16. Bxe1 Bxf3 17. Qxf3 Qb6 18. Ba5 Qb5 19. Re1 Kf7 20. Bc7 Qb4 21. Qe2 Qe7 22. g4 Qxe2 23. Rxe2 Ne7 24. Na5 $16 {Howell,D (2237)-Devereaux,M (2282) Swansea 2002}) 14. Nc5 $6 ( {Better, but still complex is} 14. h3 $142 Nd6 $132 ({or} 14... Bf8 $5)) 14... Bg4 15. Rxe8+ Qxe8 16. h3 Bxf3 17. Qxf3 Qe1+ 18. Kh2 Ng5 19. Qe3 Re8 20. Bd2 Qe2 $1 21. Qxe2 Rxe2 22. Be3 Rxb2 23. Rc1 Bf8 24. h4 Bxc5 25. Rxc5 Ne4 26. Rxc6 Nxf2 $15 {Inarkiev,E (2730)-Gelfand,B (2734) Magas rpd 2016}) {In 2017 the attention focused on} 8... f5 (8... d6 9. d4 cxd4 10. cxd4) ({or} 8... f6 9. d4 cxd4 10. cxd4 $14 {transposes to the positions, mentioned above in the notes to 8.d4. Nowadays Black prefers more active reactions:}) (8... d5 9. d3 (9. e5 f6 (9... c4 $5) 10. d4 cxd4 $13 {leads to positions from the previous line}) 9... c4 $5 10. dxc4 (10. d4 dxe4 11. Rxe4 Nf5 12. Nbd2 Be6 13. Rxe6 $5 fxe6 14. Qe2 e5 15. Nxe5 Bxe5 16. Qxe5 Qd5 17. Qe2 Nd6 18. b3 cxb3 19. axb3 e5 20. Ba3 Rfe8 21. Bxd6 exd4 22. Qc4 dxc3 23. Nf3 Qxc4 24. bxc4 Re4 25. Rc1 Rxc4 26. Ne5 Rd4 27. Bc7 a5 28. Rxc3 a4 29. Nc4 Rd1+ 30. Kh2 Rb1 31. Bd6 Rb3 32. Rc2 a3 { and White found nothing better than} 33. Nxa3 $11 {Adams,M (2738)-Harikrishna, P (2752) Baku olm 2016} (33. Ra2 c5 $1)) (10. exd5 cxd5 11. dxc4 dxc4 12. Qxd8 (12. Qe2 Nf5 (12... Bb7 $5 {is probably stronger, but White can still fight for an edge with} 13. Bf4) 13. Bf4 Bb7 14. Nbd2 Rc8 15. g4 e5 16. Bxe5 Nh4 17. Bxg7 Kxg7 18. Nxh4 Qxh4 19. Qe7 Qh6 20. Qxb7 Qxd2 21. Rad1 $16 {Areshchenko,A (2675)-Hracek,Z (2594) Hungary 2017}) 12... Rxd8 13. Na3 Bb7 14. Bxh6 Bxh6 15. Rxe7 Bxf3 16. gxf3 Bf8 17. Rc7 Bxa3 18. bxa3 Rd3 $11 19. Rxc4 Re8 20. Kg2 { ½, Zhigalko,S (2653)-Moiseenko,A (2649) Izmir 2016}) 10... dxe4 11. Qxd8 Rxd8 12. Rxe4 Rd1+ $5 (12... e5 13. Re1 f6 14. Nbd2 Nf7 15. Ne4 $5 (15. Nb3 a5 16. Be3 a4 17. Bb6 $5 (17. Nc5 Bf8 18. b3 Bxc5 19. Bxc5 Kg7 20. Rad1 Rxd1 21. Rxd1 Bf5 22. Rc1 axb3 23. axb3 Ra2 24. Be3 h5 25. Nd2 Bd3 26. f4 exf4 27. Bxf4 g5 28. Be3 Ne5 $44 {Borisek,J (2558)-Hracek,Z (2591) Baku olm 2016}) 17... Re8 18. Nc5 g5 $5 (18... Bf5 19. Nh4 Bc8 20. Rad1 f5 21. Nf3 e4 22. Nd4 Ne5 23. b3 axb3 24. axb3 Bf8 25. Ra1 Rxa1 26. Rxa1 Bh6 27. Bc7 Nd7 28. Nxd7 Bxd7 29. b4 e3 30. f4 Bg7 31. Kf1 e2+ 32. Kf2 Be6 33. Nxe6 $2 (33. Be5 $1 $16) 33... Bxc3 { Inarkiev,E (2730)-Gelfand,B (2734) Magas rpd 2016}) 19. b3 g4 20. hxg4 axb3 21. axb3 Bxg4 22. Nh4 f5 23. Rxa8 Rxa8 24. Nd7 f4 25. Nc5 Rb8 26. Bc7 Rc8 27. Ba5 Ra8 28. Bb4 Ng5 29. Nd3 e4 $5 30. Nxf4 Be5 $44 {Inarkiev,E (2730)-Gelfand,B (2734) Magas 2016}) 15... f5 16. Neg5 e4 17. Nxf7 Kxf7 18. Bg5 Rd3 19. Nd4 Ba6 20. b3 c5 21. Ne2 h6 22. Be3 Rc8 23. h4 Bf6 24. Nf4 Rdd8 25. Nd5 Bxh4 26. Bxh6 Bb7 27. g3 Bf6 28. Nxf6 Kxf6 29. Be3 Rd3 30. Kf1 g5 31. Ke2 Rxc3 32. Rac1 Rxc1 33. Rxc1 $36 {[%csl Rc5] Anand,V (2776)-Gelfand,B (2743) Moscow 2016}) 13. Re1 Rxe1+ 14. Nxe1 Nf5 15. Na3 Be6 16. Nf3 Nd6 17. Nd4 Bxd4 18. cxd4 Nxc4 19. Nxc4 Bxc4 20. b3 Bd5 $11 {Rublevsky,S (2692)-Dubov,D (2644) Sochi 2016}) 9. e5 Nf7 10. d3 {Caruana-Eljanov, Baku olm 2016, A key position which has been heavily discussed ever since:} (10. d4 cxd4 11. cxd4 c5 12. dxc5 Bb7 13. Nc3 e6 $5 ( 13... Qc7 14. Be3 (14. Bf4 Qxc5 15. Qxd7 Bxf3 16. gxf3 Qc4 17. e6 Qxf4 18. exf7+ Rxf7 19. Nd5 Qg5+ 20. Kf1 e5 21. Qe6 Raf8 $15 {Nepomniachtchi,I (2703) -Kamsky,G (2670) Sochi 2016}) 14... Qc6 15. Bd4 Ng5 16. Re3 f4 17. Rd3 Rab8 18. b4 Nxf3+ 19. Rxf3 Qe6 20. Rd3 Ba6 21. b5 Bxb5 22. Nxb5 Rxb5 23. Rc1 Rf5 24. Ba1 {½, Perini,G (2253)-Mishin,A (2292) email 2013}) 14. Be3 (14. Nd4 $6 Bxe5 15. f4 Bg7 16. Be3 g5 $1 17. fxg5 f4 18. Bf2 Qxg5 19. c6 Bxd4 20. Qxd4 Bxc6 $17 { Harikrishna,P (2763)-Mamedov,R (2655) Shamkir 2016}) (14. Bf4 g5 15. Bh2 $13) 14... Rb8 15. Bd4 h5 16. h4 Bxf3 17. Qxf3 Qxh4 18. Rad1 g5 19. g3 Qh3 20. b3 g4 21. Qg2 Ng5 22. Qxh3 Nxh3+ 23. Kg2 Ng5 24. Rh1 Nf3 $132 25. Rxh5 Nxd4 26. Rxd4 Bxe5 27. Rxd7 Bxc3 28. Rg5+ Kh8 29. Rh5+ Kg8 {½, Adams,M (2747)-Giri,A (2785) Moscow 2017}) {In 2017 Black concentrated on the immediate} 10... d6 (10... Rb8 11. b3 $5 (11. Na3 Ba6 12. Nc4 Bxc4 13. dxc4 d6 14. e6 Ne5 15. Nxe5 Bxe5 (15... dxe5 16. Be3 (16. Qa4 $5) 16... Rxb2 {½, Mastrovasilis,D (2580)-Dubov,D (2660) Minsk 2017}) 16. Bh6 Bg7 17. Bxg7 Kxg7 18. Rb1 (18. Qd2 a5 19. b3 Qc8 20. Rab1 Rf6 21. Qe2 f4 22. f3 Rf5 23. Qd3 Qf8 24. Re4 Qf6 25. Qd2 g5 26. a4 Re5 27. Rxe5 Qxe5 28. Re1 Qf6 $11 {Deac,B (2559)-Sgircea,S (2281) Medias 2016}) 18... Qa5 19. a4 Rfd8 (19... Rf6 20. Re3 Qa6 21. b3 Qc8 22. Qe1 a5 23. b4 $1 axb4 24. cxb4 cxb4 25. Rxb4 $13 {Caruana,F (2808)-Eljanov,P (2739) Baku olm 2016 For details see the notes by Moradiabadi in CBM 175.}) (19... Rb7 $5 $11) 20. Qc2 d5 21. b4 Qc7 22. cxd5 cxd5 23. Qd3 cxb4 24. Qd4+ Kg8 25. Rxb4 Rxb4 26. Qxb4 Qd6 27. Qd4 Qb6 28. Re5 Qxd4 29. cxd4 Kg7 30. g4 Kf6 31. Kg2 Rd6 32. a5 Rxe6 33. g5+ Kf7 34. Rxd5 Rd6 $11 {Quesada Perez,Y (2636)-Kuzubov,Y (2629) Monzon 2016}) (11. Nbd2 d6 $5 ({After} 11... Ba6 {apart from the transpositional 12. Nc4 White has the unpleasant} 12. Nb3 $5) 12. e6 Ne5 13. Nxe5 Bxe5 14. Nf3 (14. Qa4 $5) 14... Bg7 15. Qa4 h6 (15... Rf6 16. Qh4 h5 17. Bg5 Bxe6 $5 $44) 16. Qh4 f4 $2 ({Black should have played} 16... g5 17. Bxg5 hxg5 18. Nxg5 Rf6 19. Qh7+ Kf8 {and White hardly has more than repetition} 20. Qh5 $11) 17. Bxf4 Rf5 18. Qg4 Qf8 19. Bg3 Qf6 20. Nh4 Rg5 21. Qe2 $16 {Bok,B (2611)-Kotronias,V (2541) Moscow 2016}) 11... d6 (11... e6 $2 12. Ba3) (11... h6 12. h4 Re8 13. Ba3 d6 14. e6 Ne5 15. Nxe5 dxe5 16. Bxc5 Rb7 17. d4 Qd5 18. c4 Qd8 19. Nc3 Bxe6 20. dxe5 Qxd1 21. Raxd1 $16 {Moiseenko,V (2528)-Smirnov,P (2589) Kazan 2017}) 12. Bf4 Qc7 13. Qe2 Nd8 14. Nbd2 Ne6 15. Qe3 Nxf4 (15... d5 $142 $1 {is not fully clear}) 16. Qxf4 d5 17. h4 e6 18. h5 (18. Nf1 $5 $14 {[%csl Rc8,Gf1,Gf3,Rg7]}) 18... gxh5 19. g3 Bd7 20. Kg2 Be8 21. Ng5 Qe7 22. Ndf3 Kh8 23. Rh1 Rg8 24. Rh4 Bh6 25. Nf7+ Bxf7 26. Qxh6 Rg6 27. Qd2 Rbg8 28. Rah1 Rg4 29. Kf1 Bg6 30. Ke2 c4 31. d4 f4 $36 {Inarkiev,E (2702)-Gelfand,B (2729) Nazran rpd 2017}) (10... Ba6 11. c4 $142 $1 {limits both bishops:} (11. Bf4 e6 (11... Qb6 12. b3 Nd8 $5) 12. Qd2 h6 13. h4 c4 $1 14. d4 c5 $132 {Roiz}) 11... d6 (11... e6 12. Nc3 g5 13. Be3 (13. Na4 $5 $36 {Roiz}) 13... h5 14. h4 g4 15. Ng5 Nxe5 16. Bxc5 Ng6 17. g3 Re8 $132 18. Qa4 Bb7 19. Qb4 Ba6 20. Qa3 Bb7 21. Qb4 {½, Inarkiev,E (2730) -Gelfand,B (2734) Magas 2016}) 12. e6 Ne5 {Here the critical move is} 13. Nxe5 (13. Nc3 Nxf3+ $1 $146 (13... Rb8 14. Nxe5 Bxe5 15. Na4 Qc7 $2 {Adams,M (2744) -Giri,A (2798) Wijk aan Zee 2016} (15... Bd4 $14) 16. Rxe5 $1 dxe5 17. Qe1 $1 $16 {[%csl Rc5,Re5,Rg8] /\b3,Bb2}) 14. Qxf3 Rb8 15. Re2 (15. Qxc6 Bb7 $44 { [%csl Rc6]}) 15... Bc8 16. Bf4 Rxb2 17. Rxb2 Bxc3 18. Rab1 Bxb2 19. Rxb2 Qc7 20. Bg5 Bxe6 21. Re2 Qd7 22. Qe3 Bf7 23. Qxe7 Qxe7 24. Rxe7 Ra8 25. Rc7 d5 $11 {Caruana,F (2817)-Nakamura,H (2793) Saint Louis 2017}) 13... Bxe5 14. Nd2 Bg7 15. Nf3 {The attempt to liquidate Pe6 gave White strong pressure after} h6 16. Rb1 Bc8 17. b3 Rf6 18. d4 $1 cxd4 19. Nxd4 c5 20. Ne2 Bxe6 21. Bb2 Rf8 (21... Bf7 $5) 22. Nf4 Bf7 23. Ne6 Bxe6 24. Rxe6 $36 {Jakovenko,D (2718)-Baron,T (2540) Minsk 2017}) (10... h6 11. h4 d6 12. Bf4 g5 13. hxg5 hxg5 14. Nxg5 Nxg5 15. Bxg5 dxe5 16. Qb3+ Rf7 17. Nd2 Qd6 {Antipov,M (2529)-Sutovsky,E (2626) Jerusalem 2015} 18. Nc4 Qg6 19. f4 $1 $16) 11. Bf4 (11. e6 Ne5 12. Nxe5 dxe5 $5 13. Na3 Qd5 (13... Ba6 $142 $1) 14. Qe2 f4 (14... Ba6 $5) 15. f3 Bxe6 16. Nc4 Rf5 17. Nd2 Rd8 18. Ne4 Rf7 19. b3 Qxd3 20. Qxd3 Rxd3 21. Nxc5 Rd6 22. Ne4 Rd3 23. Nc5 {½, Wang,C (2510)-Moiseenko,A (2674) China 2017}) 11... Ba6 (11... Qc7 12. Qe2 Rb8 {Ostrovskiy,A (2381)-Djurhuus,R (2421) Oslo 2017} 13. Na3 $5 Ba6 14. b3 {/\} Qa5 15. Nc4 Bxc4 16. dxc4 Qxc3 17. Rac1 Qa5 18. Rcd1 $36) 12. e6 ( 12. c4 dxe5 13. Bxe5 Nxe5 14. Nxe5 Bxe5 15. Rxe5 Bxc4 16. Rxc5 Qxd3 17. Nc3 Qxd1+ 18. Rxd1 Bd5 19. Nxd5 cxd5 20. Rdxd5 Rfd8 21. b4 Kf7 22. f4 a6 $11 { Inarkiev,E (2702)-Gelfand,B (2729) Nazran 2017}) (12. Na3 Rb8 13. Qa4 (13. b3 g5 14. Nxg5 Nxg5 15. Bxg5 dxe5 16. Nc4 e4 17. Rc1 Qxd3 18. Qxd3 exd3 19. Rxe7 Bxc4 20. bxc4 f4 $132 {Inarkiev,E (2702)-Gelfand,B (2729) Nazran 2017}) 13... Bxd3 14. Rad1 Bb5 15. Nxb5 cxb5 16. Qxa7 Qb6 17. Qxb6 Rxb6 18. exd6 exd6 19. a3 b4 20. axb4 cxb4 21. cxb4 Rxb4 22. Bxd6 Nxd6 23. Rxd6 Rxb2 $11 {Zhigalko,S (2638)-Gelfand,B (2737) Heraklio 2017}) (12. Nbd2 Qb8 13. exd6 exd6 14. Qc2 Qd8 15. h4 Qd7 16. Nc4 Rfe8 17. Rad1 Bxc4 18. dxc4 Rxe1+ 19. Rxe1 Re8 20. Rd1 Re4 21. g3 Qe6 22. Qa4 Qd7 23. Kg2 Bf8 $11 {Grischuk,A (2761)-Radjabov,T (2724) Geneve 2017}) 12... Ne5 13. Nxe5 (13. Bxe5 dxe5 14. Nxe5 Qb8 $1 15. d4 Bxe5 16. Rxe5 cxd4 17. cxd4 Qxb2 $15 {Nepomniachtchi,I (2742)-Gelfand,B (2728) Geneve 2017}) 13... dxe5 14. Bxe5 Qxd3 15. Qxd3 Bxd3 16. Nd2 c4 $5 (16... Rfd8 $143 17. Nb3) 17. b3 (17. Nf3 $5) 17... cxb3 18. axb3 a5 19. Bxg7 Kxg7 20. Re5 Rfd8 21. Nf3 Be4 $11 {Xu,Y (2439)-Hess,M (2271) Tegernsee 2017}) 4... Bg7 5. Re1 ({ An altogether different branch is} 5. c3 Nf6 6. Re1 O-O 7. h3 (7. d4 d5 8. e5 Ne4 9. Bxc6 bxc6 10. Nbd2 cxd4 11. cxd4 c5 12. dxc5 Nxc5 13. Nb3 Nxb3 14. Qxb3 Bg4 15. Nd4 Qb6 {is considered sufficient for equality:} 16. Qxb6 axb6 17. b3 Rfc8 18. a4 Bd7 19. Bg5 Kf8 20. Rad1 e6 21. g4 b5 22. axb5 Rcb8 23. f4 Ke8 24. f5 Bf8 $132 {Kazoks,A (2399)-Fekih,B (2215) email 2013}) 7... Qb6 8. Na3 d5 9. e5 Ne8 10. d4 cxd4 11. cxd4 Nc7 12. Bxc6 (12. Ba4 Bf5 13. Bc2 e6 $11 14. g4 $6 Bxc2 15. Nxc2 f6 16. exf6 Rxf6 17. Bg5 Rf7 18. Be3 Qxb2 19. Rb1 Qxa2 20. Rxb7 Qa6 21. Rb3 Raf8 $17 {Vachier Lagrave,M (2788)-Caruana,F (2795) chess.com blitz 2016}) 12... bxc6 $5 (12... Qxc6 13. Qb3 Ne6 14. Be3 f6 15. Rac1 Qd7 16. Nc2 b6 17. Nb4 Bb7 18. Nd3 g5 (18... Rac8 $11) 19. Bd2 h6 20. exf6 exf6 21. a4 Rab8 22. a5 Ba8 23. axb6 axb6 24. Nb4 Nc7 25. Re3 h5 26. Qd3 Nb5 27. Rce1 $14 { Ponomariov,R (2718)-Van Wely,L (2654) Plovdiv 2003 For details see the notes to this game in CBM 098 by Erenburg.}) 13. Nc2 f6 14. exf6 exf6 15. Bf4 Ne6 16. Bd6 Rf7 17. Qd2 a5 18. Re2 Qd8 19. Ba3 Nc7 20. Ne3 $2 (20. Rae1 $13 {/+/=}) 20... Nb5 21. Bc5 Nd6 22. Bxd6 Qxd6 23. Ng4 Re7 24. Rxe7 Qxe7 25. Re1 Qd6 26. Qe3 Bd7 27. Qe7 Qxe7 28. Rxe7 Rd8 $15 {/-/+, Stellwagen,D (2503)-Van Wely,L (2651) Leeuwarden 2004 For details see the notes to this game in CBM 102 by Postny.}) 5... Nf6 6. e5 (6. c3 {-5.c3}) (6. Nc3 O-O 7. e5 Ne8 8. Bxc6 dxc6 9. d3 Nc7 ({or} 9... Bg4 $5 {is a better version of the game and doesn't cause Black serious problems.})) 6... Nd5 7. Nc3 Nc7 (7... Nxc3 $6 8. dxc3 O-O 9. Bg5 {() gives White a sizeable space advantage.}) 8. Bxc6 dxc6 (8... bxc6 9. d4 cxd4 10. Qxd4 {is pleasant for White - compared with a similar position mentioned above he has played the more useful move Nc3 instead of c4.} Ne6 11. Qh4 $36) 9. Ne4 {In the long run Black has a solid position with a potentially strong bishop pair. Therefore White tries to complicate Black's development and disrupt the harmony of his fundamentally sound setup.} (9. h3 O-O 10. d3 b6 (10... Ne6 11. Ne4 b6 12. b3 Nd4 13. Bb2 f5 14. Ned2 Ne6 15. a4 Qd5 16. a5 b5 17. Qe2 Rd8 18. Qe3 {Kryvoruchko,Y (2707)-Al Modiahki,M (2549) Dubai blitz 2014 } g5 $5 $15) 11. Be3 Ne6 12. Qd2 Nd4 13. Qd1 h6 14. Bf4 Be6 15. Nd2 Bd5 16. Ne2 Qd7 17. c3 Nf5 18. Qc2 Rad8 19. Rad1 Nh4 20. f3 g5 21. Bh2 Ng6 22. Nc1 f5 $1 23. exf6 exf6 $15 {Timman,J (2590)-Van der Wiel,J (2590) Brussels blitz 1987}) 9... b6 {Black wants to activate his Bc8 before he occupies e6 with his N. However, this comes at a cost and he has to give up his castling rights. The main and somewhat more popular alternative is} (9... Ne6 {, which seems at least equivalent:} 10. d3 {Even after the main move} O-O ({An interesting try is} 10... b6 $5 {with the idea of postponing castling after} 11. Be3 (11. Nfg5 h6 12. Nxe6 Bxe6 13. Bf4 Qd4 14. Qf3 Qxb2 15. Nd6+ Kd7 16. Nc4 Qd4 17. c3 Qxc3 18. Rac1 Qd4 19. Re4 Qd5 20. Ne3 Qxa2 21. d4 Rhd8 22. dxc5 bxc5 23. h4 Ke8 $17 {0-1 (30) Timman,J (2562)-Fressinet,L (2702) Douglas 2015}) (11. a4 a5 12. h3 O-O 13. Bd2 Nd4 14. Nxd4 cxd4 15. Bf4 Qd5 16. Nd2 c5 17. Nc4 Bb7 18. f3 { ½, Anand,V (2766)-Radjabov,T (2650) Benidorm rpd 2003} Qe6 $11 {[%cal Yb7d5]}) 11... Nd4 (11... Qc7 12. a4 a5 13. Qd2 O-O 14. Bf4 Nxf4 15. Qxf4 h6 16. h3 Be6 17. Nc3 Rad8 18. Rad1 Kh7 19. Qe3 Bf5 20. Ne2 g5 21. h4 g4 22. Ng3 Bg6 23. Nd2 Kh8 24. Qe2 Rd4 25. b3 b5 $13 {Gil,M (2608)-Sivic,J (2476) email 2010}) 12. Nxd4 cxd4 13. Bf4 O-O 14. Qd2 Qd5 15. c4 dxc3 16. Nxc3 Qd7 17. Bh6 Ba6 18. d4 Rad8 19. Re4 f5 20. exf6 exf6 21. Bxg7 Kxg7 22. Rae1 Rfe8 {Meszaros,T (2401) -Gasanov,E (2484) Zalakaros 2017}) 11. Be3 b6 12. Qd2 {Black has a choice:} f5 (12... Nd4 13. Nxd4 cxd4 14. Bh6 c5 15. Qf4 (15. h4 Qd5 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. Ng3 Bb7 18. f3 Qe6 19. b3 {½, Bacrot,E (2714)-Moiseenko,A (2699) WCup Tromsoe 2013 }) (15. a3 Qd5 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. Qg5 Qe6 18. f4 h6 19. Qh4 a5 20. Ng3 Ra7 21. h3 f5 22. exf6+ Qxf6 23. Qxf6+ exf6 24. Re4 h5 25. Rae1 Rc7 26. h4 Kf7 $11 { Sebag,M (2488)-Muzychuk,A (2561) Cap d'Agde rpd 2016}) 15... Bb7 16. Qh4 f6 $132 17. Bxg7 Kxg7 18. exf6+ exf6 19. Qg3 Bxe4 20. Rxe4 Qd7 21. Rae1 Rae8 22. Qf3 Rxe4 23. Rxe4 f5 24. Re5 Rf7 25. b3 Rf6 26. g3 Re6 27. Rxe6 {½, Fritz,M (2324)-Wosch,A (2184) email 2011}) 13. exf6 exf6 14. Bh6 a5 $5 15. Bxg7 (15. a4 Ra7 16. Bxg7 Rxg7 (16... Kxg7 17. Qc3 Nf4 18. d4 Nd5 19. Qb3 f5 20. Ned2 cxd4 21. Nxd4 Qf6 22. N2f3 Nb4 23. Ne6+ Bxe6 24. Rxe6 Qf7 25. Rae1 Qd7 26. h3 $40 { Kveinys,A (2530)-Ramesh,R (2475) Bled olm 2002}) 17. Ng3 Nc7 18. h3 Be6 19. b3 Re7 20. Re2 Bd5 21. Rxe7 Qxe7 22. Re1 Qd8 23. Nh2 {Velicka,P (2435)-Jirovsky,M (2439) Czech Republic 2017} Re8 $11) 15... Kxg7 16. Ng3 (16. Qc3 Ra7 17. a3 a4 18. Ng3 Qd5 19. Re4 b5 20. Rae1 Raf7 21. Ne2 Qd6 22. Qd2 Kg8 23. h4 Kg7 24. Nf4 Nc7 25. g3 Bf5 26. R4e3 h6 27. Nh2 c4 28. Rf3 c5 29. Nh5+ Kh7 30. g4 Bc8 31. Ng3 f5 $1 $17 {Timman,J (2545)-Khalifman,A (2624) Bazna 2007}) 16... Ra7 17. Re4 Re7 $142 (17... Nd4 18. Nxd4 cxd4 19. Ne2 $1 (19. Qf4 c5 20. Rae1 Raf7 21. h4 Qc7 22. Qxc7 Rxc7 23. R4e2 Kf7 24. a4 Bb7 25. b3 Rd8 $11 {Timman,J (2650) -Lautier,J (2638) Pamplona 1999}) 19... c5 20. Re1 Rff7 21. Nf4 Rae7 22. Qe2 Rxe4 23. Qxe4 Qd6 24. g3 Bd7 25. Ne6+ Bxe6 26. Qxe6 Qc7 27. a4 $36 {[%cal Ge1e8] Illescas Cordoba,M (2605)-Moreno Ruiz,J (2477) Melilla 2008}) 18. Rae1 ( 18. h4 Nd4 19. Nxd4 cxd4 20. Qf4 c5 21. Rae1 Rxe4 22. Qxe4 Rf7 23. h5 {½, Novikovas,A (2392)-Pommrich,R (2292) email 2007} Bb7 $11) 18... Rfe8 19. h4 Nd4 20. Nxd4 Rxe4 21. Rxe4 cxd4 22. Qf4 Rxe4 23. Nxe4 Be6 24. g4 Bd5 25. g5 Bxe4 26. dxe4 h5 $5 $11 {Gaprindashvili,P (2633)-Brunsek,I (2578) email 2008}) 10. Nf6+ Kf8 (10... Bxf6 $6 11. exf6 e6 12. d4 {[%csl Re7,Rf6,Rg7,Rh6] leaves the dark squares very vulnerable.}) 11. Ne4 Bg4 12. d3 $1 {The natural developing move with a tactical point was introduced by Timman back in 1995 and is the only way to pose Black problems. The alternatives are too meek:} (12. Nc3 Ne6 13. h3 Bxf3 14. Qxf3 Nd4 15. Qe4 (15. Qd1 f5 16. exf6 exf6 17. d3 f5 18. Ne2 Nxe2+ 19. Qxe2 Qd7 20. Rb1 Kf7 21. Qf3 {½, Kobalia,M (2644)-Filippov,V (2621) Sochi 2005} Rhe8 $11) 15... f5 16. exf6 exf6 17. Ne2 Qe8 18. Nxd4 cxd4 19. d3 Kf7 20. Bd2 Qxe4 21. Rxe4 f5 22. Re2 Rhe8 23. Rae1 c5 $11 {Pritchett,C (2326) -Kalavannan,K (2175) Llandudno 2017}) (12. h3 Bxf3 13. Qxf3 Ne6 14. d3 Qd5 15. Bd2 Rd8 (15... Nd4 $5) 16. Bc3 Bxe5 17. Nxc5 Qxf3 18. Nxe6+ fxe6 {Glek,I (2590) -Wells,P (2530) Wijk aan Zee 1995} 19. gxf3 Bxc3 20. bxc3 Rd6 $11 {[%cal Yf8e8, Ye8d7,Yh8f8,Yf8f5,Yf5f4]}) 12... Bxe5 $6 {Accepting the challenge. Afterwards Dubov mentioned he followed Gelfand's advice, but Mamedov was prepared as well and the next few moves came quickly. As the resulting position is dangerous for Black, while White risks almost nothing, this is a good moment to look for alternatives.} (12... Bh5 $143 $6 {is illogical:} 13. h3 Bxf3 14. Qxf3 h6 15. a4 a5 16. Nd2 Ne6 17. Nc4 Qc7 18. c3 Rd8 19. Qe4 Ng5 20. Qe2 Kg8 21. f4 Ne6 22. Qe4 Nf8 23. Be3 $16 {[%csl Gc3,Gd3,Ge5,Gf4,Rh8] ()[+], Mamedov,R (2688) -Vakhidov,J (2561) Moscow 2017}) (12... Qd5 13. c4 (13. Ned2 Bxe5 $1 14. c4 Qd6 15. Ne4 Bxf3 16. Qxf3 Qd4 $13) (13. Nc3 Qd7 14. h3 Bxf3 15. Qxf3 Ne6 $11) 13... Qd7 14. h3 Bxf3 15. Qxf3 h6 (15... Ne6 16. Ng5 Nxg5 17. Bxg5 Qe6 {Rathnakaran, K (2381)-Ramalingam,K (2046) Chennai 2011} 18. a3 $32 {[%csl Rh8][%cal Yb2b4]}) 16. Bd2 (16. b3 $5 Rd8 17. Bb2 $14 {[%cal Ya2a3,Yb3b4] saves a tempo and gives White chances to fight for an advantage with queenside expansion.}) 16... Rd8 17. Bc3 Ne6 18. Rad1 Kg8 19. h4 (19. a3 a5 20. b3 Nd4 $132) 19... h5 20. a3 a5 21. b3 Bh6 22. Bb2 Qc7 23. b4 axb4 24. axb4 Kg7 25. b5 cxb5 26. Nd6 Rhf8 27. Nxb5 Qc8 28. Qe4 {Timman,J (2620)-Van der Wiel,J (2535) Amsterdam 1996} Qa8 29. Qxa8 Rxa8 $11) ({The safest seems to be} 12... Ne6 $1 {This method was known even before Dubov was born and afterwards Daniil regretted he didn't play this restrained move:} 13. Ned2 (13. h3 Bxf3 14. Qxf3 Qd5 $11 {see Glek-Wells above. }) (13. Neg5 Nxg5 14. Bxg5 Qd5 15. Qe2 Rd8 16. Rad1 Bxf3 17. gxf3 Qe6 18. c3 Rd5 19. d4 h6 20. Be3 cxd4 21. cxd4 Kg8 22. f4 Kh7 $15 {Rayner,F (2195)-Wells, P (2519) Coventry 2005}) 13... Qd5 ({Black even has two playable alternatives: } 13... Bh6 14. h3 Bxf3 15. Nxf3 Bxc1 16. Qxc1 Kg7 17. Ng5 Qd5 18. Nxe6+ Qxe6 19. Re4 Rad8 20. Qe3 h5 21. b3 Rd5 22. Re1 Rhd8 23. Kh2 Rd4 $11 {De la Riva Aguado,O (2517)-Ivanchuk,V (2734) Olite 2006}) (13... Bh5 14. h3 g5 $5 15. Nf1 (15. Rb1 Qd5 16. b3 h6 17. Bb2 Nf4 18. Kh2 Rd8 19. g3 Ne6 20. a4 Kg8 21. Qe2 Re8 22. Ra1 f5 23. exf6 exf6 24. Qe4 f5 25. Qxd5 cxd5 $11 {Schludecker,E (2004) -Firsching,G (2069) email 2014}) 15... h6 16. Ng3 Bg6 17. b3 Qd5 18. Bb2 Rd8 19. Nd2 Kg8 20. Qf3 Kh7 21. Nde4 Kg8 22. Nf5 Bxf5 23. Qxf5 Nf4 24. Rad1 Qe6 25. Ng3 Qxf5 26. Nxf5 e6 $11 {Pinal,N (2320)-Vakhidov,J (2583) Baku olm 2016/ Vakhidov probably wanted to follow this game against Mamedov, but played 12... Bh5?! one move too early...}) (13... g5 {transposes after} 14. h3 Bh5) 14. h3 Bxf3 15. Nxf3 Rd8 16. Qe2 (16. Be3 f5 $5 {[%cal Yf8f7]} 17. exf6 exf6 18. a4 Kf7 19. a5 b5 20. Qd2 a6 21. Re2 Rhe8 22. Rae1 Re7 23. b3 Rde8 $11 {Sjugirov,S (2545)-Libiszewski,F (2480) Moscow 2008}) 16... h6 17. Be3 Kg8 18. c4 (18. Rad1 Bxe5 19. c4 Qd6 20. Bxc5 Bh2+ 21. Nxh2 Qxc5 22. Nf3 Kg7 23. Qd2 Nd4 $11 { Ni,H (2621)-So,W (2411) Manila 2006}) 18... Qxd3 19. Qxd3 Rxd3 20. Rad1 Rxd1 21. Rxd1 f5 22. exf6 Bxf6 23. Rd7 Kf7 $11 {leads to equality. This position arose in at least 5 games, starting with Lutz-J.Piket, Wijk aan Zee 1995. All were drawn, the last one being} 24. Rxa7 Bxb2 25. Rb7 Ra8 26. Rxb6 Rxa2 27. Rxc6 Ra1+ 28. Kh2 Ra4 29. Bxc5 Rxc4 30. Rb6 Bf6 31. Be3 g5 {½, Antonio,R (2519)-So,W (2627) Dapitan 2009}) (12... Bxf3 $6 13. Qxf3 Bxe5 $6 14. Nxc5 Bf6 (14... Qd6 $2 15. Rxe5 $1 $18) 15. Ne4 $36) 13. Nxe5 $1 {[%mdl 64] A modern form of the Legal combination.} Bxd1 14. Bh6+ Kg8 (14... Ke8 $2 15. Nxc6 { [%cal Re4f6]} f5 16. Raxd1 {[%csl Rd8]} fxe4 17. Nxd8 Rxd8 18. Rxe4 $18) 15. Nxc6 Bxc2 (15... Qd7 $2 16. Nf6+ exf6 17. Ne7+ Qxe7 18. Rxe7 Nd5 19. Rd7 { [%csl Rg8] wins the piece back with a decisive advantage.}) 16. Nxc5 $1 $146 { [%mdl 520] Although technically a novelty, this strong piece sacrifice was already mentioned in Kramnik's notes to his game with Timman in 1995, as well as in my book "Instructive Modern Chess Masterpieces" (2001, 2009). It's the only way to put Black under pressure.} ({Too soft is} 16. Nc3 $6 e6 17. Nxd8 Rxd8 18. Rac1 Bxd3 19. Bg5 Kg7 20. Bxd8 Rxd8 21. Red1 e5 (21... Rd4 22. Ne2 Re4 23. Nc3 {½, Laube,B (2432)-Keller,H (2406) email 2008}) (21... f5 22. f4 Rd4 23. Ne2 Rd5 24. Nc3 Rd4 25. Ne2 {½, Popovic,D (2561)-Bogosavljevic,B (2523) Vrnjacka Banja 2012}) 22. Re1 Re8 23. b3 Nb5 {½, Timman,J (2635)-Kramnik,V (2715) Riga 1995 In all these games Black completed his development and with two pawns for the exchange had nothing to worry about.}) (16. Nxd8 Rxd8 17. b4 $6 (17. Nxc5 $1 {transposes to the game, as the threat Rac1 forces Black to take on c5.}) 17... Nd5 $1 (17... Bxd3 18. bxc5 Bxe4 $2 (18... f6 19. Nxf6+ exf6 20. Re7 $36) 19. Rxe4 Nd5 20. Rd1 e6 21. c6 f6 22. c7 Rc8 23. Rxd5 exd5 24. Re7 b5 25. Bg7 {1-0, Solodovnichenko,Y (2494)-Caruana,F (2373) Hamburg 2005 }) (17... f6 18. Rac1 $1 (18. Nxc5 Kf7 19. Rac1 bxc5 20. Rxc2 Na6 21. bxc5 Nb4 22. Rce2 Rhe8 23. Rb1 Rxd3 24. h4 Nc6 $11 {Nozdrachev,L (2433)-Klyuev,A (2259) Kolomna 2013}) 18... Bxd3 19. Nxc5 $1 bxc5 20. Rxe7 $16) 18. bxc5 f6 19. cxb6 axb6 20. Nc3 Kf7 21. Nxd5 Rxd5 {and White barely drew after} 22. Be3 b5 23. d4 Bd3 24. Red1 Bc2 25. Rdc1 Bd3 26. Rd1 Bc2 27. Rdc1 Bd3 {½, Faizulaev,A (2312) -Artemenko,O (2204) Tashkent 2013}) 16... bxc5 17. Nxd8 Rxd8 18. Rxe7 $44 { Black has an extra piece, but his Kg8 and Rh8 are trapped in the corner. In 1995 this position was considered almost winning for White. While this is an optimistic evaluation, it's still Black, who has to play very accurately. Even engines, which initially promise him easy equality, start changing their mind after a while. All in all in a practical game the defender faces a difficult task.} Ne6 {The best.} (18... Nd5 19. Rxa7 Bxd3 (19... Nf6 {[%cal Yf6g4]} 20. h3 $16 {and Black remains bottled in}) 20. b3 $36 {[%cal Ya1d1]} (20. a4 $5) ( 20. Re1 $5)) 19. Re1 {Mobilising the last piece. Moreover, White sets up the motif R1xe6, which guarantees at least a perpetual. And possibly even more, as we will see later on.} (19. Rxa7 $6 Nd4 {[%cal Yd4f5] and after} 20. g4 Bxd3 21. a4 Be4 {Black is at the very least out of danger and can maybe even aspire to more than a draw.}) ({More interesting is Kramnik's (old, but maybe not quite offhand?) recommendation} 19. b3 $5 {, but White has to reckon with} Ng7 $5 (19... a6 20. Re1 {transposes to the following note}) (19... Bxd3 20. Rd1 { is similar and so is}) (19... a5 20. Rc1 Bxd3 21. Rd1 c4 22. bxc4 $44) 20. Rae1 a5 $13) 19... Ba4 $6 {Here Dubov had his first deep think. Black wants to get rid of the powerful R, but as his plan ultimately fails, the text-move is not ideal. Mamedov writes that Black should hold the position after a few accurate moves, but he is not too forthcoming about the details - quite understandably so!} ({According to Giri after the seemingly plausible} 19... a6 20. b3 $1 (20. R1xe6 fxe6 21. Rg7+ Kf8 22. Rxh7+ Kg8 23. Rg7+ $11 {is very human, but unnecessary}) 20... Bxd3 21. Rd1 c4 22. bxc4 Rb8 {his engine came up with} 23. f3 $1 Bxc4 24. a4 $18 {and already claims that Black is lost. Sure enough with the position opening up the defensive task gets extremely difficult.}) ({ This seems to indicate the best chance was} 19... Bxd3 $5 20. Rxa7 ({White has other moves such as} 20. b3 $5 {or}) (20. a4 $5 {but it's not easy to say if they bring more.}) ({Mamedov laconically gives} 20. Rd1 c4 21. b3 $13) 20... Nd4 {[%cal Yd4f5]} {and here White should already resign himself to repetition after} 21. Rd7 (21. Bg5 $6 Kg7 22. Bxd8 Rxd8 $15) (21. Rae7 Bb5 $15) 21... Rc8 22. Rc7 Rb8 23. Rb7 $11) 20. Rxa7 Bc6 (20... Bd7 {prepares f6, but this can be prevented with} 21. Re5 $36 f6 $2 22. Rd5) 21. h4 ({White is still in no hurry to resolve the tension with} 21. Rxe6 $11) ({Subsequently} 21. f3 {was mentioned as a possible improvement - if Black reacts as in the game, White can centralise his K faster. However, the text move has its pluses as well, namely it excludes ideas connected with g5.}) 21... Ra8 22. Rxe6 {Although White's pretty idea works in the end, this is the only moment when one can question Mamedov's decision due to a possible improvement on move 23.} ({After } 22. Rxa8+ Bxa8 {[%cal Ya8d5,Yf7f6,Yg8f7] the engine quickly comes up with} 23. Re5 $1 (23. g4 Bd5 24. f4 f6 25. f5 Kf7 26. fxe6+ Bxe6 $11) {and it's still very difficult to liberate Black's forces:} 23... Bc6 24. d4 $1 (24. g4 Bd7 25. Rd5 Bc8 26. f4 f6 $1 27. f5 gxf5 28. gxf5 Kf7 29. fxe6+ Bxe6 30. Rxc5 Bxa2 $11) 24... cxd4 25. b4 {[%csl Ga2,Gb4]} d3 (25... Be8 26. Ra5 $16) 26. b5 Ba8 (26... Bb7 27. Re3 Bc8 (27... d2 28. Rd3 $16) 28. Rxd3 f5 29. Ra3 $1 (29. b6 Kf7 30. b7 Bxb7 31. Rd7+ Kf6 32. Rxb7 Ra8 $14) 29... Kf7 30. Ra7+ Kf6 31. Bc1 Nd4 32. Bb2 Rd8 33. Ra8 $16) 27. Kf1 $1 $16 (27. Re3 d2 28. Rd3 f6 29. Rxd2 Kf7 $13)) 22... fxe6 23. Rc7 $1 {Brilliant, even a full R down White keeps his opponent under pressure.} (23. Rg7+ Kf8 24. Rc7+ (24. Rxh7+ $11) 24... Ke8 25. Rxc6 Kd7 26. Rxc5 Rxa2 $11 {and the tension dissipates.}) 23... Rd8 $2 { A more serious mistake, after which Black won't get back into the game.} (23... Bd5 $2 24. a4 $1 {is not ideal either, the pawn marches on and after} Rxa4 25. Rg7+ Kf8 26. Ra7+ Ke8 27. Rxa4 $16 {/+- Black faces a miserable endgame.}) ({ The correct move was} 23... e5 $142 $1 24. a3 (24. Rxc6 Kf7 $11 {[%csl Gf7] finally frees the K}) 24... Rd8 25. Rg7+ (25. Rxc6 Kf7 26. Rxc5 Rxd3 27. Rxe5 Rb8 $132) 25... Kf8 26. Rxg6+ Kf7 27. Rxc6 Rc8 $1 28. Rxc8 Rxc8 29. Kf1 c4 30. Ke2 c3 31. b4 e4 $5 (31... c2 32. Bc1 Rg8 33. g3 Ke6 $44 {and also here Black's activity should hold the balance -} 34. Kd2 Rf8) 32. dxe4 c2 33. Bc1 Rd8 {either with repetition, or an endgame with 5P:R, which is probably also a draw.}) 24. Rxc6 Kf7 25. Rc7+ $1 {[%csl Rf7] Contrary to the previous note, now Black's K remains trapped on the back rank.} ({Definitely not the greedy} 25. Rxc5 $6 Rc8 $132) 25... Ke8 26. Bg5 $1 Rb8 27. Re7+ Kf8 28. Bf6 Ra8 (28... h5 29. Rc7 Rg8 30. f4 $16 {/+- is similar}) 29. a3 h5 30. Rc7 {[%csl Rf8]} (30. Rxe6 $143 $6 Kf7) 30... Rg8 31. f4 Ke8 32. Kf2 Rb8 33. Be5 {Still ignoring the Pc5 and strengthening the position.} Rb3 ({Komodo prefers} 33... Rd8 34. Ke3 Rd7 {, but} 35. Rxc5 $16 {/+- resembles the game.}) (33... Rf8 34. Rxc5 $18 ( 34. Rg7 $5 $18)) 34. Ke3 Kd8 (34... Rb5 35. Kd2 $18 {[%cal Yd2c3,Yc3c4]}) 35. Rxc5 Rb7 36. Bc3 Ra7 37. Bb4 Kd7 38. Rg5 Kc6 39. Ke4 $18 {[%csl Re6,Rg6] White has a material advantage, moreover his pieces are active and Black's Pe6 and Pg6 vulnerable. The win is a matter of time and patient technique.} Rf7 40. Rc5+ Kb6 41. Re5 Re8 42. Ba5+ (42. a4 {, or}) (42. d4 {deserves attention, but Mamedov calmly continues manoeuvring without initially changing the character of the position.}) 42... Kc6 43. Bc3 Rf5 44. g3 Kd7 (44... Kd6 45. Bb4+ Kd7 46. Ra5 {will lead to the game position anyway.}) 45. Ra5 Rxa5 46. Bxa5 Ra8 47. Bb4 Rc8 48. Bc3 Ra8 (48... Kd6 49. a4 $18 {is lost in the long run, but now White's K penetrates.}) 49. Ke5 Ra6 50. Kf6 Rd6 (50... e5+ {gives White a choice:} 51. Kxe5 (51. Kf7 exf4 52. gxf4 Rd6 53. Bf6 Rxd3 54. Kxg6 $18) 51... Re6+ 52. Kd4 Re2 53. a4 Rg2 54. Kc5 Rxg3 55. a5 Rxd3 56. Be5 $18 {[%csl Ga5, Gb2]}) 51. Kxg6 Rxd3 52. Kxh5 Rxg3 53. a4 {This passed pawn will divert Black's K and White will decide the game on the opposite flank.} Kc6 54. Be5 Rg1 55. Kh6 Ra1 56. h5 Rxa4 57. Kg6 Ra1 58. Bf6 (58. Bf6 Rg1+ 59. Bg5 $18 { [%cal Rh5h8] and the passed Ph5 is unstoppable.}) 1-0 [Event "EU-chT (Men) 21st"] [Site "Heraklio"] [Date "2017.11.03"] [Round "6.2"] [White "Radjabov, Teimour"] [Black "Movsesian, Sergei"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E49"] [WhiteElo "2741"] [BlackElo "2671"] [Annotator "Radjabov,T"] [PlyCount "103"] [EventDate "2017.10.28"] [EventType "team-swiss"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "GRE"] [SourceTitle "CBM 182"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2018.01.17"] [SourceVersion "1"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.01.17"] [SourceQuality "1"] [WhiteTeam "Azerbaijan"] [BlackTeam "Armenia"] [WhiteTeamCountry "AZE"] [BlackTeamCountry "ARM"] {In this important match (we had started with a loss in this championship and were in a must win situation almost in every game), I had White and the only goal was to try pressing as much as I could. Improvisation started more or less from the first moves, when we finally got in a more or less classical structure arising from a Nimzo with e3.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 d5 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 O-O 7. Bd3 c6 $5 (7... dxc4 8. Bxc4 c5 {is more common}) 8. Ne2 b6 9. O-O Ba6 10. cxd5 cxd5 11. Bxa6 Nxa6 12. Qd3 {Now even if the position looks innocent at first sight, the plan for White is clear: f3-e4 and creating threats on the king's flank. Black has to play cautiously not to allow a furious attack.} Qc8 13. f3 Nb8 14. e4 Qa6 15. Qe3 {The computer suggests Qxa6 followed by e5 and a4, but I honestly don't think it's the way to play for a win.} Nc6 16. Ng3 Kh8 {An interesting move; Black prepares for the Qg5 move where he can always protect g7 by ...Rg8.} 17. a4 {I was trying to free my bishop on c1 as I thought it's the only badly placed piece in White's camp. Attack does not work yet and making useful moves makes sense for now.} Na5 {Very logical, Black goes for the c4-square and will decide about the c1-bishop, if he should capture or not.} 18. e5 Nd7 19. Ba3 (19. Qg5 Qd3 { and I was not sure what to do! The queen may come to g6 followed by ...f6 for example, c3 hanging and the knight is coming to c4 or b3.}) 19... Nc4 20. Qg5 { It all looks dangerous for Black at first sight, but I thought that Black can go for ...Nxa3 followed by ...Qd3 and it seemed to me that the position is ok for Black, even though there are still a lot of tricks in the air, Nh5-Qe7-f4-f5 somewhere, but of course if was a viable option. The computer suggests even ...Rfe8 and after Nh5 Rg8:)} f6 {This came as a surprise! Black weakens the e6-pawn and gives a lot of targets for my pieces to attack.} (20... Rfe8 21. f4 (21. Nh5 $6 Rg8 22. Qe7 Qc8 23. Qxf7 Ndxe5 $3 24. dxe5 Nxa3 $1 $17) 21... f6 22. Qh5 g6 23. Qh4 Nxa3 24. Rxa3 $13) 21. exf6 Rxf6 22. Nh5 $1 { An important move; the rook should go to f7 now.} Rf7 23. Rfe1 {I thought that the position could be equal, but playing Black here is harder at least. He has to protect the e6-pawn and watch out for tricks with the last rank being weakened.} Nxa3 $1 (23... b5 $2 24. axb5 Qxb5 25. Bb4 $1 {I was hoping for this!} Qc6 {it looks like Black is fine but...} 26. Rxa7 $3 Rxa7 27. Qd8+ Nf8 28. Bxf8 $18) 24. Rxa3 Re8 25. Nf4 Qc8 $1 {Very strong defence by Black, I was already worried about the e5 thrust, that's why all my thoughts were to protect against it.} 26. Re3 {Defending c3 in order to bring the rook from a3 to e1.} Rf5 $2 {The first bad move comes here, Black had to go for complications after ...e5, but my opponent did not have enough time here to calculate the consequences.} (26... e5 $1 {worried me the most!} 27. Nxd5 exd4 28. cxd4 Qc1+ 29. Kf2 Qd2+ 30. Kg3 Ref8 $1 {I was not sure what this is, but thought that Black should play this way for sure and the computer agrees.} 31. Ne7 $1 {with some slight pressure but Black should keep it all. For example, one very strong move being} Qb4 $3 $11 {with the idea to play ...Qd6+ and ... Qxd4 later to follow.}) 27. Qg3 Qb8 $2 {One more bad move by Black in an already not so pleasant position.} (27... Qc6 $1 {Active defence was preferable; the queen stands much better here, eyeing a4 and c3 as well as protecting e6 but after say} 28. Nd3 $14 {White still maintains some pressure.} ) 28. Nd3 $1 e5 29. Ra2 $1 {I like this move and now after seeing that the computer thinks it is the best move here, even more so, I was hesitating if I have to go 29.Qe1 instead but I did not like some things there. As shown in the lines, the computer says that Ra1 is the best, but I wanted to protect the second rank, feeling, as I did, that in endgames it could be important.} (29. Qe1 $5 e4 30. fxe4 dxe4 31. Rxe4 Rxe4 32. Qxe4 Rf8 {and I was not sure here how to convert my advantage at all. c3 is weak my king is not great and ...Nf6 is always in the air.}) 29... exd4 30. Qxb8 Rxb8 31. cxd4 Rf7 32. Rc2 Kg8 33. Re6 $1 {A strong move, with the idea to attack d5 or bring the rook to the c-line and fully occupy the c-file and the 7th rank.} Nf6 34. Ne5 Rfb7 35. Rec6 $6 (35. g4 $1 {The computer points out this very strong move, that would end the game much faster. Now there is simply no move for Black: the rook goes to d6 and h4 is coming, the king comes to g3 and the position is completely lost for Black.}) 35... h6 36. h4 b5 37. axb5 Rxb5 38. Ra6 R5b7 39. Rca2 Kh7 (39... Nh5 $1 {would be much more tenacious, Black wants to bring the knight to f4.} 40. Kh2 $1 Rb2 41. Rxa7 Nf4 42. Nd7 Rxa2 43. Rxa2 Rc8 44. Kg3 Ne6 45. Nb6 $16 { 3 vs 2 with knights and rooks is a hard constellation to hold, but it would be the best chance for Black!}) 40. Rxa7 Rxa7 41. Rxa7 Rb4 $2 {Losing move!} ( 41... Nh5 $1 {was still the best!} 42. g4 Nf4 43. h5 $1 Ne2+ 44. Kf2 Nxd4 45. Rd7 {with good chances for White, but still Black has chances!}) 42. Nc6 $1 Rc4 43. Nd8 Nh5 44. Ne6 Rc1+ 45. Kh2 Re1 46. Ra6 Nf6 47. g4 {White's play is very simple: the king comes to g3 and many pawns make Black's task impossible, g5 is threatening all the time and Black's king is very weak. Here I was sure that I was winning already.} Kg8 48. g5 $1 hxg5 49. hxg5 Nh7 50. g6 Nf8 51. Nf4 Rd1 52. Ra8 {Black resigned! An important victory as we managed to win 2.5-1.5 due to my win and the win of Rauf that day. This helped us a lot in chasing the title!} 1-0 [Event "EU-chT (Men) 21st"] [Site "Heraklio"] [Date "2017.11.01"] [Round "5.4"] [White "Matlakov, Maxim"] [Black "Can, Emre"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E81"] [WhiteElo "2730"] [BlackElo "2604"] [Annotator "Szabo,Kr"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2017.10.28"] [EventType "team-swiss"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "GRE"] [SourceTitle "CBM 182"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2018.01.17"] [SourceVersion "1"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.01.17"] [SourceQuality "1"] [WhiteTeam "Russia"] [BlackTeam "Turkey"] [WhiteTeamCountry "RUS"] [BlackTeamCountry "TUR"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 O-O 6. Be3 c5 7. Nge2 Nc6 8. d5 Ne5 9. Ng3 h5 10. Be2 h4 11. Nf1 e6 12. Bg5 ({Previously} 12. f4 {was the common move, but White now has to reckon with the brilliant} Nxc4 $3 13. Bxc4 b5 14. Bxb5 exd5 15. e5 dxe5 16. fxe5 Bg4 17. exf6 Bxd1 18. fxg7 Kxg7 19. Bxc5 h3 $132 {Svidler-Grischuk, London 2013; with a complicated position.}) 12... h3 13. Ne3 hxg2 14. Nxg2 exd5 $6 $146 {A novelty by Can. The most straightforward continuation, but now this is a dubious move.} (14... Qa5 {was more accurate,} 15. Bd2 Qa6 16. Nf4 exd5 17. Nfxd5 Nxd5 18. Nxd5 Be6 19. Bc3 Bxd5 20. Qxd5 Nc6 $13 {Murray-Yanushevsky, ICCF email 2009; with a double-edged fight.}) 15. Nxd5 $1 Be6 ({In the event of} 15... Re8 16. h4 $36 {and White has a strong initiative on the kingside.}) 16. Ngf4 Re8 (16... Qa5+ $6 {could have been met by} 17. b4 $1 $16 {and the f6-knight is hanging.}) 17. h4 $1 {White continues the attack and he protects the g5-bishop.} ({The logical} 17. Qd2 $4 {is a blunder, as} Nxe4 $1 $17 {and suddenly Black is better.}) 17... Ned7 18. Qd2 Bxd5 19. Nxd5 Nf8 20. h5 N8h7 {Black tries to defend as much as possible, but White's attack is too fast.} 21. hxg6 Nxg5 22. Qxg5 Re5 23. gxf7+ Kxf7 24. Qf4 Kg8 (24... Qa5+ 25. Kf2 $18 {followed by Rag1 is hopeless for Black.}) 25. Ne3 $1 {The best reply!} (25. O-O-O $6 Nxd5 26. cxd5 Qg5 {and Black can exchange queens.}) 25... Nh5 {Otherwise Nf5 is too dangerous for Black.} 26. Qh2 Qa5+ ({ In the event of} 26... Qg5 27. Kd2 $1 (27. Nf5 {could have been met by} Rxf5 $1 28. exf5 Ng3 29. Rg1 Be5 {Black still has practical chances.}) 27... Rf8 28. Rag1 Qf4 29. Qh3 $18 {with a decisive attack.}) 27. Kf2 Rf8 28. Rag1 Qd2 { Black tries to create practical chances, but objectively White is winning.} ({ Obviously} 28... Rxe4 $2 {does not work, because of} 29. Qxh5 $18 {and mate soon.}) 29. Rg4 Rf7 30. b3 $1 {A great cool-blooded reply!} ({The tempting} 30. Rhg1 $2 {is a big mistake, because of} Nf6 $1 $132 {and suddenly Black has some threats.}) 30... Kf8 (30... Qxa2 31. Rh4 $18 {is winning immediately.}) 31. Rd1 $1 {Another strong reply!} Qb2 32. Rxd6 Nf6 33. Rf4 ({Probably} 33. Rh4 $1 {(from the engine) was stronger, but the text move was also winning.} Nxe4+ 34. Rxe4 Rxe4 35. Rd8+ Re8 36. Rxe8+ Kxe8 37. Qb8+ Kd7 38. Qxb7+ Ke8 39. Qc8+ Ke7 40. Nd5+ $18) 33... Rh5 34. Qg3 Qe5 35. Rd8+ Ke7 36. Rd1 Rg5 $6 {Loses immediately, but Black's position was already bad.} (36... Nxe4+ $2 {is also losing, as} 37. Rxe4 Qxe4 38. Qd6+ Ke8 39. Qd8#) ({even} 36... Bh6 {was tougher,} 37. Nd5+ Nxd5 38. Rxf7+ Kxf7 39. Qxe5 Be3+ 40. Kg3 Rxe5 41. cxd5 Rg5+ 42. Kh4 $18) 37. Nf5+ {Great attacking game by Matlakov!} 1-0 [Event "EU-chT (Men) 21st"] [Site "Heraklio"] [Date "2017.11.06"] [Round "9.1"] [White "Lenic, Luka"] [Black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D43"] [WhiteElo "2650"] [BlackElo "2762"] [Annotator "Szabo,Kr"] [PlyCount "149"] [EventDate "2017.10.28"] [EventType "team-swiss"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "GRE"] [SourceTitle "CBM 182"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2018.01.17"] [SourceVersion "1"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.01.17"] [SourceQuality "1"] [WhiteTeam "Slovenia"] [BlackTeam "Netherlands"] [WhiteTeamCountry "SLO"] [BlackTeamCountry "NED"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bxf6 (6. Bh4 dxc4 7. e4 g5 8. Bg3 b5 {is the sharper main line in the Moscow Variation.}) 6... Qxf6 7. e3 g6 8. Be2 Bg7 9. O-O O-O 10. e4 dxc4 (10... dxe4 {is another possibility.}) 11. Bxc4 Qd8 (11... Nd7 {is more common.}) 12. e5 c5 {Black immediately attacks White's centre. He has the bishop pair, so he wants to open the position.} 13. dxc5 Nd7 14. Qe2 Nxc5 15. Rfd1 ({3 years ago Giri had a game with} 15. Rad1 {,} Qe7 16. Rd6 b6 17. Rfd1 Nb7 18. R6d2 Na5 19. Bd3 Bb7 20. Be4 Rad8 21. Rd6 Bxe4 22. Nxe4 Nb7 23. Rxd8 Rxd8 $11 {Bacrot-Giri, Linares 2014; with an equal position; later Black managed to win.}) 15... Qe7 16. Nb5 Bd7 17. Nd6 a5 $6 $146 {A novelty, but this is a dubious move, because he weakens the light squares.} (17... Bc6 {was important,} 18. Nd4 Qg5 19. Nxc6 bxc6 20. b4 $1 (20. Re1 $6 {is dubious, as} Nd7 21. Qe4 Nxe5 22. f4 Nf3+ $1 23. Kh1 Qc5 24. Qxf3 Qxd6 $17 {Lupulescu-Mamedyarov, Baku 2016; and Black looks nicely placed.}) 20... Na4 21. Re1 Nc3 22. Qe3 Qxe3 23. Rxe3 Nd5 $11 {with an equal position.}) 18. Qe3 b6 19. Nd4 Rad8 20. Rd2 f6 $5 {White is very active, so Black tries to complicate the position. Nevertheless White already has an advantage.} 21. Nb3 fxe5 ({In the event of} 21... Nxb3 22. Qxb3 fxe5 (22... Rb8 $2 {could have been met by the brilliant} 23. Nf5 $3 gxf5 24. Rxd7 $1 $18 {and White is winning.}) 23. Qxb6 $16) 22. Nxc5 bxc5 23. Qxc5 Rf4 24. Qc7 {Threatening Bxe6.} ({The immediate} 24. Qxa5 $16 {was also better for White.}) 24... Kf8 25. Qxa5 Rd4 26. Rxd4 exd4 27. Ne4 d3 (27... Kg8 28. Nc5 $16 {is also unpleasant for Black.}) 28. Rd1 $1 {The most accurate reply.} Bc6 (28... Bxb2 {is also hopeless, because of} 29. Rxd3 $18) 29. Nc5 Bd5 30. b3 $1 {A safe and a good move.} ({The greedy} 30. Rxd3 $6 {could have been met by} Rc8 $1 31. Bxd5 Qxc5 32. Qxc5+ Rxc5 33. Bf3 Bxb2 {still Black has some chances to survive.}) 30... Bd4 31. Nxd3 Be4 {Black keeps the bishop pair and tries to create some threats. } 32. Qe1 $1 {A professional move, White protects everything and avoids Black's threats.} Bf5 33. g3 ({Probably} 33. Ne5 $1 $18 {was stronger, as suggested by the engine.}) 33... Qa7 34. Qe2 Kg7 ({Even} 34... h5 $5 {gave the best practical chance.}) 35. g4 $1 $18 {Another strong move, White forces the exchange of part of the bishop pair.} Bxd3 36. Bxd3 (36. Rxd3 $1 {was more accurate, for example:} Rf8 37. Qxe6 $1 Bxf2+ ({or} 37... Rxf2 38. Qg8+ Kf6 39. Qh8+ $18 {wins.}) 38. Kg2 $18 {and Black has to resign.}) 36... Rf8 37. Rf1 e5 38. Kg2 Qb6 39. Be4 Rf7 40. Qd2 ({The immediate} 40. f3 $18 {was also fine.}) 40... Rf4 41. f3 Rf7 42. Rb1 {Prepares for a4.} Be3 43. Qc3 Bf4 44. Qc6 { The best practical move to exchange the queens.} Qxc6 45. Bxc6 Rc7 46. Be4 Rd7 47. Rb2 {White has to defend against ...Rd2.} h5 48. h4 Rd2+ 49. Rxd2 Bxd2 { White is two pawns up; moreover they are connected passed pawns on the queenside, so Black has no chance to survive.} 50. Kf2 {Otherwise ...Be1.} Bb4 51. g5 $1 {As the principle says: In opposite coloured bishop endgames the stronger side has to fix the pawns on the same colour as that of the opposing bishop.} Kf7 52. a4 Ba5 53. Ke2 Bb4 54. Kd3 {White has to sacrifice the h4-pawn.} Be1 55. Kc4 Bxh4 56. a5 Bxg5 {White has sacrificed his g- and h-pawn to advance his queenside pawns.} 57. a6 (57. b4 $18) 57... Be3 58. Kd5 h4 59. Bd3 h3 60. Bf1 h2 61. Bg2 Kf6 62. b4 Kf5 63. Kc6 Kf4 64. b5 Kg3 65. Bh1 Kf2 66. b6 Kg1 67. a7 Kxh1 68. a8=Q Kg2 69. b7 h1=Q 70. b8=Q Bf4 71. Qc8 {A smart solution.} Qc1+ ({There is a nice way of winning after} 71... Kxf3 {,} 72. Kc5+ e4 73. Qxe4+ $1 Kxe4 74. Qc6+ $18 {.}) 72. Kd7 Qd2+ 73. Ke8 g5 74. Qg4+ Kf2 75. Qa1 {A nice victory by Lenic!} 1-0 [Event "GRENKE Chess Classic"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.04.07"] [Round "7.3"] [White "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2789"] [BlackElo "2784"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "72"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 Bb4 {"I felt that he was very unfamiliar with the opening" (Caruana)} 5. Bg2 O-O 6. O-O e4 7. Ng5 Bxc3 8. bxc3 Re8 9. Qc2 {Quite a rare line.} ({The big theory is:} 9. d3) ({Or} 9. f3) 9... d5 ({ The battle of the legends saw:} 9... Qe7 10. d3 exd3 11. exd3 b6 12. Bd2 Bb7 13. Rfe1 Qa3 14. Bf4 Na5 15. Be5 Bxg2 16. Kxg2 Ng4 17. d4 g6 18. Qe4 Nxe5 19. dxe5 h6 20. Nf3 Qc5 {with approximate equality, Ljubojevic,L (2571)-Karpov,A (2626) Platja d'Aro 2017}) 10. cxd5 Qxd5 11. d3 Bf5 12. Bf4 h6 13. Nxe4 ({ "I just made sure that after"} 13. dxe4 Nxe4 14. c4 ({Therefore Black expected: } 14. Nxe4 Bxe4 15. Bxe4 Qxe4 16. Qxe4 Rxe4 17. Bxc7 Rxe2 {where he is "a little better, but it should be a draw"(Caruana)}) 14... Qd4 15. Rad1 Qc3 { "and here I thought I am already much better" (Caruana)}) 13... Nxe4 14. Qb2 ( 14. c4 Qe6 15. dxe4 Bxe4 16. Qxe4 Qxe4 17. Bxe4 Rxe4 18. Bxc7 Rxe2 {is similar to the assesment above.}) 14... b6 15. Rfd1 ({Black expected that his opponent will grab the pawn:} 15. Bxc7 Rac8 16. Bf4 Na5 17. Rad1 Qe6 18. Bxe4 Bxe4 19. dxe4 Qxe4 {but then he will have "very good compensation" (Caruana) for it. Indeed, the weak queenside pawns and the superior light piece provide enough for the material deficit.}) 15... Qc5 16. dxe4 Bxe4 17. Bf1 $146 {"This was a little bit of surprise" (Caruana)} ({The predecessor saw:} 17. Bxe4 Rxe4 18. Rd7 ({Caruana expected} 18. Bxc7 Na5 19. Bf4 Rae8 {and indeed this does not seem good for White. For example:} 20. e3 Nc4 21. Qc2 g5 $1) 18... Ne5 19. Bxe5 Qxe5 20. e3 Rc4 {Stulrajter,M (1821)-Blasko,A (1900) Slovakia 1998}) 17... Re7 ({Caruana rejected:} 17... Na5 18. Qb4 Qc6 19. f3 Bd5 20. e4 Bc4 21. Bh3 Be6 { with possible repetition as he felt he may play for more.}) 18. a4 ({Or} 18. Rd2 Rae8 19. Rad1 g5 20. Be3 Qf5 {"when the doubling of the white rooks along the d-file looks pointless" (Caruana)}) 18... Rae8 {Now the position resembles the Nimzo-Indian defense. White's bishop pair is not an advantage at all, as the bishops do not occupy commanding squares. The weakness of the white queenside pawns determines the evaluation into Black's favor instead.} 19. Rac1 $6 {"This whole concept of a2-a4 followed by Ra1-c1 feels wrong." (Caruana)} ({ The American GM expected instead:} 19. Qb5 Qxb5 ({Not} 19... Qxc3 20. Rac1 Qf6 21. f3 Nd4 22. Qc4 c5 23. fxe4 (23. Rxd4 cxd4 24. fxe4 Rxe4 25. Qd3) 23... Rxe4 {with unclear position (Caruana)}) 20. axb5 Na5 {and now Black believed he is better thanks to the weak white pawns.}) (19. Qa3 {Another possibility was:} Qf5 20. f3 Bc2 21. e4 (21. Rd2 g5) 21... Qf6 22. Rd2 g5 {which looks good for Black. (Caruana)}) 19... g5 20. Bd2 (20. Be3 Qf5 {followed by Nc6-e5 is excellent for Black.}) 20... Qf5 21. f3 ({Or} 21. c4 Ne5 22. Rc3 c5 {followed by Be4-c6 (Caruana)}) 21... Qc5+ 22. Kh1 ({Caruana speculated that MVL missed the tactics after:} 22. Kg2 Bxf3+ $1 23. exf3 ({On} 23. Kxf3 {Black planned:} Ne5+ ({Even easier is:} 23... Qg1 $1 24. Bh3 Re3+ 25. Bxe3 Rxe3+ 26. Kg4 Qxh2 { with inevitable mate.}) 24. Kg2 Nc4 {with a win.}) 23... Re2+ 24. Bxe2 Rxe2+ 25. Kh1 Qf2 {and mate cannot be stopped.}) 22... Bd5 ({Here Caruana was not that sure about:} 22... Bxf3+ 23. exf3 Qf2 24. Bg2 Re2 (24... Rd8) 25. Rg1 Rxd2 26. Qb5 Qc5 27. f4) ({Neither about:} 22... Bg6 23. Be1) 23. Be1 {A sad defense, but:} (23. c4 $2 {loses to the same} Rxe2 ({Or} 23... Qf2) 24. Bxe2 Rxe2 25. Rf1 Bxf3+ 26. Rxf3 Ne5) ({So does:} 23. e4 Rxe4 $1 24. Qb5 (24. fxe4 Bxe4+ 25. Bg2 Bxg2+ 26. Kxg2 Re2+ 27. Kh1 Qd5+ 28. Kg1 Qg2#) 24... Qf2 { (Caruana)}) 23... Bc4 24. e4 (24. Rc2 Ne5 {wins prosaically for Black.}) 24... Bxf1 25. Bf2 Qc4 26. Rxf1 Qxa4 {Save and reliable. Black is up a pawn, and has the more active pieces.} ({He had to avoid though:} 26... Ne5 27. Bd4 Nd3 28. Qe2 {(Caruana)}) ({Or} 26... g4 27. Qd2) 27. c4 (27. Bd4 Qc4 $1) 27... Ne5 28. Bd4 g4 {Very energetic way of converting the advantage. Black plays for the attack.} (28... Nd3 {After the game Caruana regretted that he did not go for the "more technical"} 29. Qa1 Qxa1 30. Rxa1 Rd7) 29. fxg4 ({Or} 29. f4 Nf3 30. Bh8 f5 31. exf5 Qc6 {and Black mates first (Caruana)}) 29... Qd7 ({Black should also win after:} 29... Qc6 30. Qe2 Ng6 31. Qf3 Qxe4 32. Bf6 Qxf3+ 33. Rxf3 Re4) ({Only not} 29... Nd3 $2 30. Qd2 Nxc1 31. Qxh6) 30. Qc3 c5 $1 { "I was very happy to get rid of the bishop, as I am collecting all the pawns now." (Caruana)} ({Black aslo felt that} 30... Qxg4 31. Rf4 Qg6 32. Rcf1 Nd7 { sould be winning, but it was way more complicated.}) 31. Bxe5 (31. Be3 Nxg4 { wins for Black easily.}) 31... Rxe5 32. Qf3 Rxe4 33. Rcd1 Qe6 34. g5 hxg5 35. Rd5 g4 36. Qc3 Re5 0-1 [Event "St Louis, MO USA"] [Site "St Louis, MO USA"] [Date "2018.04.18"] [Round "1"] [White "Yaroslav Zherebukh"] [Black "Wesley So"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B51"] [WhiteElo "2640"] [BlackElo "2786"] [PlyCount "106"] [EventDate "2018.04.18"] 1. e4 c5 {Of course this move is not a surprise, but So has been a king's pawn player in recent events. Then again, most of his opposition is a bit higher rated than Zherebukh is.} 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nd7 {In response to Zherebukh's quiet opening choice, So opts for the most challenging line.} (3... Bd7 4. Bxd7+ (4. a4 {was always a favorite of mine.}) 4... Qxd7 5. c4 {is too solid; So would likely find a path to neutralize White's opening advantage, but there would be little hope for more.}) 4. Ba4 $6 (4. d4 {is the most common and principled. White strikes in the center and develops naturally, though Black of course has typical Sicilian chances.}) 4... Ngf6 5. O-O a6 6. c4 g6 ({ Playing into White's hands with} 6... Nxe4 $2 {would have been a poor choice, considering that So had no idea this variation was going to be played. White's play is straightforward:} 7. Re1 Nef6 8. d4 cxd4 (8... g6 9. dxc5 dxc5 10. Bf4 {spells huge trouble for Black. The extra pawn is not worth the deficit in development.}) 9. Nxd4 e6 (9... g6 10. Bf4 e5 11. Nc3 Be7 (11... Bg7 12. Nc6 $1 bxc6 13. Qxd6 Nb8 14. Qxe5+ Kf8 15. Rad1 Bd7 16. Qd4) 12. Bh6 {is tragic. Black is pinned all over the place.}) 10. Rxe6+ fxe6 11. Nxe6 Qb6 12. Qe2 { is a line that no rational human voluntarily enters.}) 7. Nc3 Bg7 8. d3 O-O 9. h3 b6 10. Rb1 Bb7 11. Bg5 {The first new move.} (11. Be3 {was played last month by Boruchovsky, though the game continuation allows White to play Qd1-d2 with a gained tempo, hitting the pawn on h6.}) 11... h6 12. Be3 Qc7 13. Qd2 Kh7 14. b4 {Zherebukh appears to have achieved everything a player wish for. He has more space, controls the immediate pawn breaks, and has no weaknesses. Yet there is no clear path to obtain more than a symbolic advantage. In order to turn an edge into a full point, a second weakness is typically required. So, in his defensive effort, is in no rush to do much of anything.} Rac8 15. Rfc1 { necessary to defend the knight and thus prevent ...cxb4 followed by b5.} e6 16. Ne2 (16. Rc2 {tests So's setup. Black has to be attentive to the impending pressure down the b-file. Breaking with} d5 {might backfire:} (16... Rfd8 17. Rcb2 cxb4 18. Rxb4 b5 19. Bxb5 $1 {requires Black to be ultra accurate to avoid defeat.} axb5 20. Nxb5 Qb8 21. Ba7 Qa8 22. Nxd6 Bxe4 23. dxe4 Qxa7 24. Nxc8 Rxc8 25. Rb7 Qc5 26. Rxd7 Nxd7 27. Qxd7 Rc7 {when Black should hold.}) 17. cxd5 exd5 18. Bf4 Qd8 19. Bxd7 Qxd7 20. bxc5 {with many hanging pawns and vulnerable squares.} bxc5 (20... dxe4 21. Ne5 Qd4 22. Rxb6 Ba8 23. Rxa6 exd3 24. Nxd3 {provides compensation at best for the sacrificed material.}) 21. e5 { with an initiative.}) 16... Rfd8 17. Ng3 Ba8 18. a3 Nb8 19. Nh2 Nc6 20. f4 Nd4 21. Rf1 $2 {Clearly overlooking the power of Wesley's response.} (21. Qf2 { or a similar noncommittal move kept the balance.}) 21... b5 $1 {Ouch. Black expands without any repercussions.} 22. cxb5 axb5 23. Bd1 (23. Bxd4 {would be acceptable if not for} Nxe4 $1 24. dxe4 Bxd4+ 25. Kh1 bxa4) 23... Qa7 24. Ra1 cxb4 (24... Nf5 $3 25. exf5 Nd5 {wins on the spot. The rook and bishop on e3 can't be defended all at once (the threat is ...Nxe3 followed by Bd4).}) 25. Qxb4 Nd7 26. Kh1 {This was not Yaro's day; he seemed to be missing everything. He could have stayed in the game with} (26. Ra2) 26... Nc2 {and the rest is fairly straightforward. So never gave his opponent an opportunity to get back into the game.} 27. Bxa7 Nxb4 28. Rb1 Nxd3 29. Rxb5 Bc6 30. Rb1 Ra8 31. Be3 Rxa3 32. Bf3 h5 33. Ne2 N3c5 34. Bxc5 Nxc5 35. e5 Ba4 36. exd6 Rxd6 37. Rbc1 Nb3 38. Rc7 Nd2 39. Re1 Rd7 40. Rxd7 Bxd7 41. Rd1 Ra2 42. Nc1 ({Perhaps} 42. Nf1 Nxf3 43. Rxd7 {gave Zherebukh some hope though} Nh4 {seems to paralyze White's forces} (43... Rxe2 44. gxf3 Kg8 45. Rd8+ Bf8 46. Nd2 {actually is not so simple. The knight will be quite strong on e4 and the White pawns are not easy to attack.}) 44. Nd2 Nf5) 42... Ra1 43. Nd3 Rxd1+ 44. Bxd1 Ne4 45. Nf3 Bb5 46. Nfe1 h4 47. Kh2 Bc3 48. Bc2 Bd2 49. Nf3 Bxd3 50. Bxd3 Bxf4+ 51. Kg1 Be3+ 52. Kf1 Ng3+ 53. Ke1 Kg7 {White tipped his king, as} (53... Kg7 54. Nxh4 e5 { is lights out. So follows up with 55...e4 and the knight on h4 is trapped.}) 0-1 [Event "Shamkir2018"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.04.20"] [Round "2.2"] [White "Topalov, Veselin"] [Black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A28"] [WhiteElo "2749"] [BlackElo "2777"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "97"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [WhiteClock "1:00:30"] [BlackClock "0:10:36"] 1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. a3 d5 {It is interesting to see how the generations change their assessments. Some years back Larsen called this move a mistake as it leads to a favorable line of the Sveshnikov Sicilian with reversed colors for White. (True, the great Dane had another position in mind, the one after 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.d3 and now 4...d5.)} 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Qc2 ({Apparently Giri is not afraid of the reversed Sveshnikov after} 6. e4 Nf4 7. d4 (7. d3 Bg4 8. h3 Bxf3 9. Qxf3 Nd4 10. Qd1 c6 {and Black was more than fine in Yilmaz,M (2536)-Palac,M (2604) Sarajevo 2012}) 7... exd4 8. Bxf4 dxc3 9. Qxd8+ Nxd8 10. bxc3 Ne6 {as the position is indeed equal.}) 6... Nxc3 { Another unforced concession. There is nothing wrong with either:} (6... Be7) ({ or} 6... Be6) 7. dxc3 ({White can also take towards the center} 7. bxc3 Bd6 8. e3 O-O 9. d4 Qe7 10. Be2 b6 11. O-O Bb7 {as in Kramnik,V (2808) -Karjakin, S (2781) Stavanger 2017 But you would not expect Topalov to follow Kramnik, would you?}) 7... Bd6 8. e4 {Now we have reversed Kan and full symmetry. If Black experience any problems, they are minor.} O-O 9. Bc4 Qe7 $146 {A novelty in comparison to the restricting:} (9... a5 10. a4 Bg4 11. h3 Bxf3 12. gxf3 Qf6 13. Rg1 h6 {Muthaiah,A (2316)-Preotu,R (2463) Porto Carras 2015 which has been seen in Muthaiah,A (2316)-Preotu, R (2463) Porto Carras 2015}) 10. Bg5 (10. b4 {will be met with} Be6) 10... Qe8 11. O-O-O {White is showing determination to play hard for the win.} (11. O-O Be6 12. Bxe6 ({Surprisingly, the line} 12. Bd5 f6 13. Be3 Bxd5 14. exd5 Ne7 {is more dangerous for White as in the game, as Black will soon start moving his pawn majority against the white king.}) 12... Qxe6 13. b4 a5 {would be around equal.}) 11... Be6 ({If} 11... Na5 12. Bd5 Be6 {then White has the additional choice of} 13. c4) 12. Bd5 f6 13. Be3 Bxd5 14. Rxd5 (14. exd5 Ne7 15. h4 b5 {will be more fun for Black to play as White has hooks on the queenside.}) 14... Ne7 15. Rdd1 {Topalov wants to keep the d2 square available for the knight.} (15. Rd2) 15... Qc6 $1 {Slowing down White's idea of Nf3-d2-c4 and openining of the d-file.} 16. Nd2 a5 17. Qb3+ Kh8 18. Qc4 {Giri had missed this move.} ({Not} 18. Nc4 $2 a4 19. Qa2 Qxe4 20. Nxd6 cxd6 21. Rxd6 Qxg2) 18... Qd7 {Now both white pieces have to compete for the c4 square.} 19. a4 $1 {Play on the light squares. In the future White plans Qc4-b5 followed by Nd2-c4.} b6 20. f3 (20. Qb5 $5 {was already interesting, but perhaps Topalov did not see how to crack Black's defenses after} Qxb5 21. axb5 Rad8 22. Nc4 Nc8) 20... Rab8 21. Kc2 b5 {Opens files for the rooks, but weakens the pawn structure. Now Giri has to be very careful whenever he enters the endgames (or rather not enter them at all.)} 22. axb5 Rxb5 23. Ra1 Rfb8 24. b3 (24. Ra2 $5) 24... Ng6 25. Qa4 {Topalov's is sharply following his plan. The c4 square is that tempting in these positions for the knight!} Qe7 26. Nc4 Bc5 $1 {Giri gets rid of his bad bishop and brings the queen out for counterplay. He may easily consider sacking both the queenside pawns now.} ({ Two rooks are clearly better than the queen after} 26... Rxb3 27. Qxb3 Rxb3 28. Kxb3) 27. Bxc5 Qxc5 28. Rhd1 Nf4 (28... Rxb3 $2 {is even worse now than before due to} 29. Qxb3 Rxb3 30. Rd8+ Nf8 31. Rxa5) 29. Rd2 h6 {Air for the king is needed.} 30. Qa3 a4 $2 {Missed by Topalov, but it's not good.} (30... Qc6 { would have kept Black in the game. For example the line} 31. Nxa5 Qe6 32. Nc4 Rxb3 33. Qxb3 Rxb3 34. Kxb3 {leads to a position where the rooks are no longer better than the queen. Milady pins the knight and bothers successfully the white king.}) 31. bxa4 Rb4 {A study-like combo!} 32. Rb1 $1 {Oops. A study-like refutation in return!} ({Missed by Giri. Otherwise White has to play } 32. cxb4 {when} Rxb4 33. Kd1 Qg1+ 34. Kc2 Qc5 {draws.}) 32... Qxc4 33. Rxb4 Rxb4 34. Qxb4 Qa2+ {Luckily for Giri, White has to give up his passed pawn here.} 35. Qb2 Qxa4+ 36. Qb3 Qa6 {Still, it seems like a miracle for Black to survive. White's problem however is that his king is not as safe as his counter-part. Or at least it looks so.} 37. g3 Ne6 38. Qd5 $2 ({Topalov didn't go} 38. h4 $1 {because of} Nc5 {and now after} 39. Rd8+ Kh7 40. Qg8+ Kg6 { he tought Black might give a perpetual somewhere but White can just go} 41. h5+ $1 Kxh5 42. Qxg7 {and wins, e.g.} Qa2+ (42... Qe2+ 43. Rd2) 43. Kd1 Qb3+ (43... Qb1+ 44. Ke2 Qc2+ 45. Rd2) 44. Ke2 Qc4+ 45. Kf2 {In this line it turns out that the black king ain't safe neither.}) 38... Ng5 39. f4 {Bothers the knight, but leaves the white king exposed till the end of the game.} (39. Qd8+ Kh7 40. Qd7 {was a better try.}) 39... Nf3 ({Worse is} 39... Qa4+ 40. Kd3 Qa6+ 41. Ke3 Qb6+ 42. Ke2) 40. Rd1 ({On} 40. Rf2 c6 41. Qb3 Kh7 $1 {is strong with decent drawing chances.} ({Not} 41... f5 42. fxe5 fxe4 43. e6)) 40... Qe2+ {Forces matters.} (40... c6 {looks also good.}) 41. Kb3 (41. Kc1 {was the last chance according to the computer.}) 41... Nd4+ 42. Rxd4 exd4 43. Qxd4 Qxh2 44. Qd8+ ({ The passer is not fast enough after} 44. e5 fxe5 45. fxe5 Qxg3 46. e6 Qg6 47. Qd8+ Kh7 48. e7 Qb1+ (48... Qb6+ $2 49. Kc2) 49. Kc4 Qe4+) 44... Kh7 45. Qd3 Kh8 46. e5 fxe5 47. fxe5 Qg2 48. Qd8+ Kh7 49. Qd3+ 1/2-1/2 [Event "ch-USA 2018"] [Site "Saint Louis USA"] [Date "2018.04.20"] [Round "3"] [White "Xiong, Jeffery"] [Black "Caruana, F.."] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A61"] [WhiteElo "2665"] [BlackElo "2804"] [PlyCount "98"] [EventDate "2018.04.18"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 c5 {I considered the Benoni to be a wise choice against Xiong. The asymmetrical pawn structure makes it difficult for White to force drawish tendencies, meaning Xiong had to prove his might against the hottest player in the world. Caruana's repertoire has been great, particularly with Black: he is playing solidly and chooses openings that keep the games dynamic, giving him chances to play for more than just a draw.} 4. d5 d6 5. Nc3 exd5 6. cxd5 g6 7. Bf4 ({The main line has been} 7. e4 Bg7 8. h3 O-O 9. Bd3 b5 {with a complicated dynamic. Agressive elite players like Topalov and the late Vugar Gashimov were frequently on the Black side of the Benoni.}) 7... Bg7 8. e3 ({Disrupting Black's coordination with} 8. Qa4+ Bd7 9. Qb3 Qc7 10. e4 { has proven quite successful for White. The bishop on d7 occupies the knight's developing square while the queen tends to be a bit uncomfortable on c7 - bishops tend to win those staredowns.}) 8... O-O 9. h3 Qe7 10. Nd2 Nh5 11. Bh2 f5 12. Be2 f4 13. O-O (13. Bxh5 $5 fxe3 14. fxe3 gxh5 (14... Qxe3+ $2 15. Qe2 { leaves White up a piece.}) ({Getting greedy with} 14... Bxc3 15. bxc3 Qxe3+ 16. Qe2 Qxc3 {fails to the simple} 17. Rb1 gxh5 18. Bxd6 {when Black's position collapses.}) 15. Nce4) 13... fxe3 14. Nde4 (14. Bxh5 exd2 15. Qe2 {is just bizarre. Black always has to keep an eye out for his weak d6 pawn.}) 14... exf2+ 15. Kh1 Bxc3 $1 {Giving up the bishop is scary, but White now must capture with the knight and temporarily delay pressure on the d6 pawn.} 16. Nxc3 Ng7 {Finally the knight reroutes to the center.} 17. Bf3 Nd7 (17... Nf5 18. Rxf2 Nd7 {transposes to the game.}) 18. Rxf2 Ne5 19. Re2 Nf5 {Heading for d4. If it gets there, White is in grave danger.} 20. Bxe5 dxe5 21. d6 $1 { A thematic and timely (second) pawn sacrifice. White was unable to sit and wait, since Nd4 was a powerful threat.} Nxd6 22. Qd5+ ({Xiong misses an opportunity to achieve equality:} 22. Nd5 Qg7 23. Nc3 {when Black can repeat with Qe7. If Black tries to play for a win with} Nf7 {White can continue by attacking (pinning) the knight on f7, which is required to defend the e5 pawn. Both 24. Bd5 and 24. Qb3 seem strong.}) 22... Nf7 {Now Black has a lasting slight edge.} 23. Ne4 Rb8 24. Qxc5 (24. Nxc5 {doesn't help at all; Black's development is complete and Xiong's forces are being pushed back.} Rd8 25. Qc4 b6) 24... Qxc5 25. Nxc5 b6 26. Ne4 Bf5 ({The bishop would love to fianchetto, though here White will just fork the enemy rooks.} 26... Bb7 27. Nf6+ Kg7 28. Nd7) 27. Nc3 Rbd8 28. a4 $2 {This move is a bit careless. Xiong allows Caruana to fix the pawn structure on the queenside. Even if he were to regain his lost pawn, White's remaining pawns are vulnerable.} a5 29. Bd5 Rfe8 30. Bxf7+ ({ Xiong isn't able to pile up on the e5 pawn before capturing the knight, since} 30. Rae1 {is met by} Be6) 30... Kxf7 31. Rf1 Ke6 32. Rfe1 Kf6 33. Rf1 Ke6 34. Rfe1 Kd6 35. Re3 ({A miraculous line that Caruana showed in his post-mortem is: } 35. Nb5+ Kc5 (35... Kd7 {keeps the slight edge.}) 36. b4+ $3 Kxb4 ({not} 36... axb4 $2 37. Rc1+ Kd5 38. Nc7+ Kd4 39. Nxe8 Rxe8 40. Rb2 {when White is ahead.}) 37. Rb2+ Kc4 38. g4 {Black's vulnerable king gives White legitimate chances here. Caruana understood he wasn't in too much danger of losing in this position, but clearly this is a huge improvement for White compared to the game, which was a slow grind.}) 35... Kc6 $1 36. Nb5 ({Winning the e-pawn restores material equality, but only for a few moves.} 36. Rxe5 Rxe5 37. Rxe5 Rd2 38. Rb5 (38. Re2 Rxe2 39. Nxe2 Kc5 {with king infiltration is a straightforward win. White will lose both pawns on the queenside.}) 38... Rc2 { followed by Bd3.} (38... Bd3 $4 39. Rd5 {is a deadly pin.})) 36... Re7 37. g4 Bd3 38. Nc3 Bc4 39. Rc1 {Threatening Nb5, but Caruana wasn't falling for any tricks.} Kb7 40. Re4 Rd4 41. Kg1 Bb3 42. Kf2 Rd2+ 43. Re2 Rf7+ 44. Ke3 Rd4 45. Nb5 Rdd7 (45... Rxa4 $2 46. Nd6+) 46. Nc3 Rf4 47. Rd2 Rfd4 48. Rf2 Bxa4 49. Rf6 Bc6 0-1 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.04.22"] [Round "4.4"] [White "Topalov, Veselin"] [Black "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C83"] [WhiteElo "2749"] [BlackElo "2814"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "83"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 {Since his teenage years Mamedyarov successfully exploited the Open Ruy Lopez.} 6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5 8. dxe5 Be6 9. Be3 Be7 10. c3 O-O 11. Nbd2 Nxd2 12. Qxd2 Na5 13. Bc2 Nc4 14. Qd3 g6 15. Bh6 {This came as surprise for Mamedyarov who believed that 15.Bc1 is the main move.} Nxb2 {Simply grabbing the pawn.} ({The other possibility is:} 15... Re8 16. Nd4 Bd7 17. Rae1 Nxb2 18. Qf3 Bg5 19. Bxg5 Qxg5 20. Qxd5 { as in Tari,A (2570)-Ernst,T (2372) Vasteras 2016}) 16. Qe2 Re8 {Black plays for the maximum.} ({Topalov was more afraid of the positional exchange sacrifice after} 16... c5 17. Bxg6 (17. Bxf8) 17... fxg6 18. Bxf8 Qxf8 19. Qxb2 {with compensation thanks to the bishop pair and the central pawn mass.}) 17. Nd4 Bd7 18. f4 {For the pawn White got some time to advance on the kingside. The plan is obvious f4-f5 followed by e5-e6 and mate somewhere around the f7 square.} c5 {Naturally, Black gets rid of the knight asap.} 19. Nf3 Qb6 20. Qf2 d4 $146 {A novelty, and a logical one. This is the best way to distract the flank attack.} ({The email predecessor ended in a draw after:} 20... Nc4 21. Rae1 Bd8 22. Ng5 Na3 23. e6 Rxe6 24. Nxe6 fxe6 25. f5 exf5 26. Qg3 Bc7 27. Qh4 Bd8 28. Qg3 Bc7 29. Qh4 {1/2-1/2 (29) Haznedaroglu,K (1990)-Wojcik,W (2185) ICCF email 2006}) 21. Bg5 {The dark squares are weak and Topalov needs to attack them first and foremost.} ({The pawn is immune:} 21. cxd4 $6 cxd4 22. Nxd4 $2 Bc5) 21... dxc3 22. Qh4 ({The other way to build the attack was:} 22. Bxe7 Rxe7 23. Ng5 {to which Black planned} ({Topalov also mentioned the line:} 23. f5 Bxf5 (23... gxf5 {is also possible.}) 24. Bxf5 gxf5 25. Nh4 Kh8 ({ White is better after} 25... Rae8 26. Qg3+ Kh8 27. Nxf5 Rg8 28. Qxc3 Na4 29. Qh3) ({However} 25... Re6 $1 26. Qg3+ Rg6 27. Qxc3 c4+ 28. Kh1 Nd3 { (Mamedyarov) is enough to end White's attack.}) ({But the best defense was not mentioned by the players-} 25... Nd3 $1 26. Qg3+ Kh8 27. Nxf5 c4+ 28. Kh1 Rg8 { and Black wins.}) 26. Nxf5 Rxe5 27. Qg3 Qf6 28. Nh6 Qxh6 29. Qxe5+ Qg7 { where Black should not be worse.}) 23... f5 $1 24. Bb3+ Kg7 {Here tactics} 25. Nxh7 {is ignored with the strong} Nd3 $1 26. Qh4 c4+ 27. Kh1 Rf7 {when the white pieces are left discordinated and weak.}) 22... c4+ 23. Kh1 Bf8 $1 { A strong defensive resource. The Bg5 obstructs its own knight in reaching the black king.} ({But not:} 23... Bxg5 24. Nxg5 h5 25. Ne4 {when White's attack is huge.} ({Or} 25. f5)) 24. f5 Nd3 {Again in time to shut the second bishop. Topalov proceeds with the attack.} 25. e6 $1 Bxe6 $1 {The only move, but an excellent one. Being many pawns ahead Mamedyarov is OK to part with some material in order to reduce the attacking potential of the opponent.} ({ Otherwise Black is checkmated-} 25... fxe6 $2 26. fxg6 hxg6 27. Bf6 Bg7 28. Ng5 ) 26. fxe6 Rxe6 27. Rad1 {Only here did White realize that on his planned:} ( 27. Nd4 {There is the strong:} Rd6 $1 ({Instead:} 27... Re5 {allows the sacrifice:} 28. Rxf7 $1 Kxf7 29. Qxh7+ Ke8 30. Bxd3 cxd3 31. Rf1 {with a possible perpetual after:} Ra7 32. Rxf8+ Kxf8 33. Qh8+ Kf7 34. Qh7+ Ke8 35. Qh8+ Kd7 36. Qxe5 d2 37. Qe7+ Kc8 38. Qe8+ Kb7 39. Qe4+)) 27... Rae8 (27... Rd6 $5) 28. Bxd3 cxd3 29. Rxd3 {The smoke has finally cleared. For the piece Black has three pawns and two of them are very dangerous passers. Mamedyarov is better.} Re4 ({The Azeri GM did not like that in the line:} 29... b4 30. Bd8 Qb5 31. Ng5 h6 {White has:} 32. Qf2 $1 {Now:} ({But not} 32. Nxe6 Qxd3 33. Qf6 Qxf1+ $3 34. Qxf1 Rxe6 {which is what Mamedyrov was hoping for and which is indeed a win for him despite the material deficit.}) 32... f5 ({Both players missed the computer idea:} 32... R6e7 $3 33. Bxe7 Rxe7 {with an edge for Black. }) 33. Nxe6 Qxd3 34. Nxf8 Rxd8 35. Nxg6 c2 (35... Qc4) 36. Rg1 {The position is not yet clear. Black has to find though:} Qc3 $1 {which gives him excellent winning chances after:} ({Instead:} 36... Qd1 {is weaker due to:} 37. Qc5 Qxg1+ $2 38. Kxg1 Rd1+ 39. Kf2 c1=Q 40. Qf8+ Kh7 41. Qf7#) 37. Ne7+ Kf7 38. Qxf5+ Kxe7 39. Qe4+ Kd6 40. Rc1) 30. Bf4 Be7 {Not a bad move.} ({Black rejected the possible draw in the line:} 30... h6 31. Rxc3 g5 32. Nxg5 hxg5 33. Qxg5+ Qg6 34. Qh4) 31. Qg3 b4 ({The pawn might be lost after} 31... c2 32. Rc3 ({ Although the line that Mamedyarov calculated-} 32. Ng5 Rxf4 33. Qxf4 Qf6 $1 { has a flaw-} 34. Nh3 Qxf4 35. Nxf4 {and White defends the back rank.})) 32. Ng5 Bxg5 33. Bxg5 Qe6 34. h3 {Topalov did a good job in co-ordinating his pieces.} (34. h4 $5) 34... Qe5 $2 {Only this is a mistake. Queens needed to stay on the board.} ({Correct was} 34... a5 35. Kh2 {and now for example:} Qxa2 36. Rd7 R4e5 37. Rfxf7 Qxf7 38. Rxf7 Kxf7 {Black should survive here.}) 35. Kh2 Qxg3+ 36. Kxg3 h6 ({White has excellent winning chances after} 36... Re1 37. Rxe1 Rxe1 38. Bf6 Re8 39. Rd6 Rc8 40. Bg5 c2 41. Bc1 {but this was more resilient.}) 37. Bxh6 Re1 38. Rf6 $1 R1e6 39. Rf2 Re2 40. Rd5 Rxf2 41. Kxf2 f6 42. Be3 { Black pawns are tamed and will soon drop one after another.} 1-0 [Event "Shamkir2018"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.04.23"] [Round "5.3"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Wojtaszek, Radoslaw"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B23"] [WhiteElo "2843"] [BlackElo "2744"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "65"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [WhiteClock "0:45:15"] [BlackClock "0:06:33"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 d6 3. d4 {Vintage Carlsen- no theory at all!} cxd4 4. Qxd4 Nc6 5. Qd2 ({Moreusual is the set up after:} 5. Bb5 Bd7 6. Bxc6 Bxc6 7. Nge2 Nf6 8. f3 e5 9. Qd3 h6 10. Be3 {Guseinov,G (2646)-Amonatov,F (2636) Riadh 2017}) 5... Nf6 6. b3 e6 7. Bb2 a6 8. O-O-O b5 $146 ({There is just one predecessor, which quickly ended in a draw after:} 8... Qa5 9. Kb1 Be7 10. f4 {1/2-1/2 (10) Fernandez de Bobadilla,J (2106)-Fernandez de Bobadilla,G (2167) Granada 2015}) 9. f3 h5 $6 {"This (idea) was a bit too much" (Wojtaszek)} (9... Be7 {was good "with normal position" (Carlsen)}) 10. Nh3 $1 Be7 11. Ng5 {Now Black is stuck as he cannot castle on either side.} h4 12. f4 Bb7 13. Kb1 Rc8 ({If} 13... Qc7 {White can try to reach the f7 square with} 14. f5 e5 15. a4 bxa4 16. Bc4) 14. Be2 Qc7 15. Rhe1 Nh7 {"I could not see anything else"(Wojtaszek)} 16. Nxh7 Rxh7 17. g4 $6 {Timid. "I thought I could win prosaically but of course that is a terrible attitude." (Carlsen)} ({The world champion's intuition was telling him that:} 17. Nd5 $1 {is the winning move, but he could not see a clear-cut win. The computer helps with:} exd5 18. exd5 Nd8 (18... Nb8 {is similar after} 19. Bd3 Rh5 20. Rxe7+ $1) 19. Bd3 Rh5 (19... Rh8 {loses faster after} 20. Bxg7 Rg8 21. Bf6) 20. Rxe7+ $1 {The point.} Qxe7 ({The rook is hanging on h5 after} 20... Kxe7 21. Qe2+) 21. Re1 Ne6 22. dxe6 {With crushing attack for White. For example:} f5 (22... fxe6 23. Bg6+) 23. g4 $1 hxg3 24. hxg3 {The threat is again g3-g4 to clear teh diagonal for the bishop. Then} Bf3 25. Qf2 Bg4 {allows } 26. Qb6 {and Black is completely helpless.}) ({Black also expected} 17. Bg4 Kf8 18. f5 Ne5 19. Bh3 Rh6 {where he has "some squares" and chances to survive. }) 17... hxg3 18. hxg3 Bf6 {Now Black is back in the game.} 19. Bd3 ({The pawn is not poisoned and can be taken:} 19. Qxd6 Qxd6 20. Rxd6 {But Black has compensation after both} Rh2 ({Or the preliminary} 20... Nb4 21. e5 Be7 22. Rdd1 Rh2)) 19... Rh8 20. g4 Nd4 ({The standard} 20... g5 $2 {fails to the standard} 21. Nd5 $1) 21. Re3 Kf8 $1 {Missed by Carlsen.} ({Apparently, he expected:} 21... g5 22. Nd5 $1 exd5 ({Or} 22... Bxd5 23. fxg5 Bxg5 24. Bxd4) 23. e5 dxe5 24. fxe5 Be7 25. Bxd4 {where White should be winning.}) 22. Ne2 Nxe2 23. Rxe2 Bc3 ({Better than} 23... Bxb2 24. Kxb2 {where the white king takes care of himself.}) 24. Bxc3 Qxc3 25. Qe3 Rc5 $2 {And just when the Polish GM came back into the game, he overrelaxed and committed a decisive mistake.} ({Correct was:} 25... Qc5 26. Qc1 a5 {where "White is better, but not much" (Carlsen)}) 26. e5 $1 dxe5 {Black is not happy to open files against his king, but he hardly has any choice.} (26... d5 {is positional suicide after } 27. f5 {When White has the perfect French- huge positional advantage plus unstoppable attack.}) 27. fxe5 Rh1 {Loses by force.} ({Or else the attack along the half-open f-file is decisive-} 27... Rc8 28. Rf1) 28. Rxh1 Bxh1 29. Rh2 Rxe5 {Not just to take the pawn, but to defend the g5 square.} ({Mate is unstoppable after} 29... Bd5 30. Rh8+ Ke7 31. Qg5+) 30. Rh8+ Ke7 31. Qa7+ { Black resigned due to:} Kd6 32. Rd8+ Kc6 33. Rc8+ 1-0 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.04.25"] [Round "6.4"] [White "Topalov, Veselin"] [Black "Mamedov, Rauf"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B33"] [WhiteElo "2749"] [BlackElo "2704"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 {The Sveshnikov Sicilian. Once condemned as strategically flawed, nowadays it is considered a solid opening choice. Boris Gelfand, for instance, successfully solved the problem of the black color in his match against Vishy Anand.} 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Bg5 a6 8. Na3 b5 9. Bxf6 gxf6 10. Nd5 f5 11. Bd3 Be6 12. O-O Bxd5 13. exd5 Ne7 14. Re1 Bg7 15. c3 O-O 16. Nc2 Re8 17. Qh5 e4 18. Bf1 Nxd5 19. Qxf5 Re5 20. Qh3 Qb6 { One of the reasons behind the solid reputation of the Sveshnikov Sicilian lies in the fact that everything is very forced and deeply explored.} ({Mamedov chose a different square for the queen less than month ago:} 20... Qf6 { and drew after} 21. a4 Nf4 22. Qd7 Rd8 23. Qb7 Qh4 24. g3 Nh3+ 25. Bxh3 Qxh3 26. Ne3 Bh6 27. Qxa6 f5 28. Rad1 f4 29. Rxd6 Rxd6 30. Qxd6 fxe3 31. Qxe5 exf2+ 32. Kxf2 Qxh2+ 33. Kf1 Qh1+ 34. Kf2 Qh2+ {1/2-1/2 (34) Sjugirov,S (2652) -Mamedov,R (2709) Batumi 2018}) 21. Rad1 Rae8 {"My coach told me that Topalov will play very aggressively. When he put the rook on d1 I thought he wants to sacrifice the exchange, but did not believe he will." (Mamedov)} 22. Rxe4 $1 $146 {Topalov, as a master of the exchange sacrifice, did not need to be asked twice. "A good lesson for me." (Mamedov)} ({A predecessor saw colorless draw after:} 22. Rd4 R8e6 23. Qg4 h5 24. Qd1 Rf5 25. Rd2 {1/2-1/2 (25) Szczepanski, Z (2514)-Mokrys,C (2486) ICCF email 2015}) 22... Rxe4 23. Rxd5 {For the exchange White has a pawn, better pawn structure, but what is more important- a lot of improving ideas.} h6 {This takes the g5 square under control and opens some air for the king. The drawback of the move is that it deprives the bishop of the h6-c1 diagonal.} ({The lack of "luft" can be seen in a line like: } 23... R4e5 {Topalov believed this was Black's best.} 24. Rd1 a5 25. a3 Re2 $2 {Double attack, which fails tactically after} (25... h5 {seems better, but looks happier after say} 26. Qd3) 26. Bxe2 Rxe2 27. Qc8+ Bf8 28. Qg4+ { counter-double attack.}) 24. Qd3 R8e6 25. g3 R4e5 26. Bg2 ({Later White regretted that he did not start with the prophylactic} 26. a3 $1 Rf6 (26... h5 27. Bg2) 27. Ne3 {For example:} h5 28. Bg2 Bh6 29. Rxe5 dxe5 30. Nf5 Bc1 { (Topalov, Mamedov) and now} 31. Qd7 $1 {is indeed better for the first player as} Bxb2 $2 {loses to} 32. Qe8+ Kh7 33. Be4 {with mating attack.}) 26... b4 $1 {Mamedov needs counterplay asap. Otherwise White will simply do all the preparatory moves line a2-a3, Nc2-e3-f5 and will totally dominate.} 27. cxb4 ({ Another option was pointed out by Topalov:} 27. Rxe5 dxe5 ({Mamedov planned instead} 27... Bxe5 28. Nxb4 (28. cxb4) ({However} 28. Bd5 Rf6 29. Ne3 { looks better for White.}) 28... a5 {which is indeed OK for Black.}) 28. Bd5 bxc3 29. bxc3 {and here Black holds on his own with} e4 $1 30. Bxe4 Bxc3) ({If } 27. c4 Re2 28. Rf5 {Black can sacrifice back the exchange with} Rxc2 29. Qxc2 Re1+ 30. Bf1 Qd4 {where the more active black bishop should compensate him for the pawn.}) 27... Re2 28. Rf5 Qc7 {This is what the sacrifice was about: the heavy pieces get into the white camp.} 29. Ne3 Qc1+ 30. Bf1 ({Topalov missed from afar} 30. Nf1 Qc2 $1 {and the only one to worry about his position is White.} ({Less convincing was Mamedov's idea} 30... Qxb2 31. Bd5 Re7 32. Rf4 ( 32. Qf3 $2 Rxf2 $1) 32... Kh8 {when White is better after} 33. Qxa6)) 30... Rxb2 31. a3 ({To a beautiful draw leads:} 31. Qxa6 Rxe3 $1 32. Qa8+ $1 ({ But not:} 32. fxe3 $4 Qxe3+ 33. Kh1 Qe4+ 34. Kg1 Bd4+ 35. Rf2 Bxf2#) 32... Kh7 33. fxe3 Qc2 34. Bg2 Qxf5 35. Be4 Rb1+ 36. Kg2 Rb2+) 31... Ra2 (31... Qd2 { might have been more precise.}) 32. Qd5 Rxa3 33. Kg2 Raxe3 {Liquidates into an opposite-colored bishop endgame.} ({Retreats like} 33... Qc7 34. Bc4 $1 { would be wrong as White can easily build attack on the color of his own bishop. }) 34. fxe3 Qxe3 35. Bxa6 {In slight time-trouble Topalov forces the draw.} ({ The former world champion did not trust his chances after} 35. Bd3 $1 {but this was his best try. For example} Qd2+ (35... Bd4 36. Rf3 $1) (35... Rf6 $4 { loses on the spot after} 36. Qa8+) ({Still, the impression is that Black should hold, say after} 35... Qa7) 36. Kh3 Qxb4 37. Bc4 ({Or} 37. Qa8+ Bf8 38. Qf3)) 35... Qe4+ 36. Qxe4 Rxe4 37. Rb5 Kf8 38. Bb7 Re2+ 39. Kh3 Bd4 40. Bf3 Rb2 41. Rd5 (41. Rb8+ Ke7 42. b5 f5 {ith the threat Bd4-g1 is unpleasant for White. }) 1/2-1/2 [Event "St Louis, MO USA"] [Site "St Louis, MO USA"] [Date "2018.04.25"] [Round "7"] [White "Fabiano Caruana"] [Black "Varuzhan Eduardovich Akobian"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C11"] [WhiteElo "2804"] [BlackElo "2647"] [Annotator "Hess, R"] [PlyCount "59"] [EventDate "2018.04.18"] 1. e4 e6 {Playing the French against Caruana has proven to be a risky venture. Lenderman tried - and failed - in round three, essaying a Winawer. This time around Akobian attempted a Steinitz, though here too the world number two player was extremely well prepared.} 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. Nf3 Be7 7. Be3 Nc6 8. Qd2 b6 {Far less popular than the main continuation.} ( 8... O-O {is typically played here. If White continues with} 9. Be2 b6 { now has no real drawback. The position remains slightly better for White thanks to the superior light-squared bishop, but Black has no tactical issues.} ({I've actually played this line once as Black. A slightly better endgame for White can appear by force, though of course the players can choose to keep queens on the board.} 9... a6 10. O-O b5 11. a3 Qb6 12. Nd1 cxd4 13. Nxd4 Nxd4 14. Bxd4 Qxd4+ 15. Qxd4 Bc5 16. c3 Bxd4+ 17. cxd4 Nb8 18. Kf2 Nc6 19. Ke3 Bd7 20. Rc1 Rfb8 21. Rc5 b4 22. a4 b3 23. Nc3 Nb4 24. Bd3 Nc2+ 25. Bxc2 bxc2 26. Rc1 Rxb2 27. Kd3 Rb4 28. Rxc2 h5 29. Ra2 Ra7 30. g3 Kh7 31. h3 Rab7 32. Ra5 Rc7 33. Rxa6 Rcc4 34. Ne2 Bxa4 35. Ra7 Kg8 36. Ra8+ Kh7 37. Ra7 Be8 38. Ke3 Rb3+ 39. Kf2 h4 40. Re7 Rc8 41. Kg2 Bb5 42. Rb7 hxg3 43. Rxf7 Bd3 44. Nxg3 Bg6 45. Re7 Rcc3 46. Nf1 Be4+ 47. Kf2 Rf3+ 48. Ke2 Rxf4 49. Nd2 Rxh3 50. Rxe6 Bd3+ { 0-1 (50) Patel,A (2478)-Hess,R (2568) Las Vegas USA 2017})) 9. Bb5 Qc7 (9... Bb7 10. O-O-O a6 11. Bxc6 Bxc6 12. f5 b5 13. fxe6 fxe6 14. Ne2 c4 15. Ng5 Nf8 16. Rhf1 Bxg5 17. Bxg5 Qd7 18. Qc3 h6 19. Qh3 Rh7 20. Qf3 Rh8 21. Qh3 Rh7 22. Qf3 Rh8 23. Qh5+ g6 24. Qh3 {1-0 (24) Bok,B (2614)-Kjartansson,G (2457) Gjakova 2016}) 10. O-O-O {Apparently a novelty, and new to Akobian. Caruana was clearly well prepared for this line and obtained a huge advantage.} a6 { This move is slow. I already didn't love Black's position - less space and a that terrible French bishop on c8 - but this allows White a straightforward attack.} ({There is mutual room for improvement, but an absolutely crazy game happened two years ago in this line:} 10... O-O 11. h4 a6 12. Bd3 f5 13. g4 c4 14. gxf5 cxd3 15. fxe6 Ndb8 16. Nxd5 Qd8 17. Nxe7+ Nxe7 18. Ng5 h6 19. Qxd3 hxg5 20. hxg5 Bxe6 21. Qh7+ Kf7 22. d5 Bf5 23. e6+ Ke8 24. Qxg7 Qc7 25. Rh2 Nxd5 26. Qxf8+ Kxf8 27. Rxd5 Bh7 28. b3 Ke8 29. g6 Bxg6 30. Rh8+ Ke7 31. f5 Bxf5 32. Rxf5 Qc3 33. Bg5+ Kxe6 34. Rf6+ Qxf6 35. Bxf6 Kxf6 36. Rh6+ Ke5 37. Rxb6 Kd5 38. Kb2 Nc6 39. a3 Kc5 40. Rb7 Rg8 41. Rh7 Rg2 42. Rh5+ Kd6 43. Kc3 Rg3+ 44. Kb2 Rg2 45. Kc3 Rg3+ 46. Kb2 Rg2 {1/2-1/2 (46) Kramnik,V (2812) -Buhmann,R (2653) Dortmund 2016}) 11. Bxc6 Qxc6 12. f5 $1 {The move plays itself. As is typical of the French, Black can not afford to capture the pawn lest he compromise his pawn structure and lose the d5 pawn.} c4 (12... exf5 13. dxc5 Bxc5 14. Nxd5 {is a huge advantage for White.}) (12... O-O 13. f6 gxf6 14. Bh6 Bb7 (14... fxe5 15. Qf2 f5 (15... Kh8 $2 16. Bxf8 Bxf8 17. Nxe5 Nxe5 18. Qf6+ $1 Bg7 $2 (18... Kg8 19. dxe5 $18) 19. Qd8+ $18) 16. Qg3+ Kf7 17. Qg7+ Ke8 18. dxe5 $16)) 13. f6 $1 {Fabiano plays with fire. He knew that he would be better in other variations, but he felt this was most forcing.} (13. fxe6 Qxe6 {seems reasonable. Queens tend to be poor blockaders, though in the absence of a knight getting to g5 (or f4) extremely quickly, Black can try to maintain the position.} (13... fxe6 14. Bg5 Bf8 {was mentioned by Caruana in the post-mortem, though here Black is too far behind in development after} (14... Bb4 15. a3 Ba5 16. Rhf1 O-O 17. Be7 {would be devastating. The bishop plants itself on d6 and White takes over the f-file.}) 15. Nh4) 14. Bg5 Bxg5) 13... gxf6 14. exf6 Bxf6 (14... Nxf6 $2 15. Ne5 Qc7 16. Rhf1 $18) 15. Rhf1 $36 (15. Bg5 Bg7 16. Rhf1 h6 {was an imprecise move order. Black kicks White from the g5 square, which slows the pressure on the f7 square.}) 15... b5 $6 {Caruana felt that this move was too slow, but Black was already in huge danger. Akobian desperately needed to castle queenside as quickly as possible.} (15... h6 16. Bxh6 Be7 17. Rde1 (17. Bg5 f6 {is actually good for Black, since White's attack has successfully been parried.}) 17... Bb7 {and White needs to come up with something concrete to prevent long castling. The position is certainly still better for White, but Black is hanging tough.}) (15... Be7 16. Ne5 Nxe5 17. dxe5 Bb7 18. Qf2 O-O-O 19. Bxb6 {lets Black live, but the resulting position is absolutely terrible for Black. Material equality is restored and once again the same theme is at play: The French bishop (now on b7) can't liberate itself from the pawn chain that blunts it.}) (15... Bb7 16. Bg5 Bxg5 17. Nxg5 f6 18. Nxe6 Qxe6 19. Rde1 Ne5 20. dxe5 fxe5 21. Rxe5 (21. Qg5 ) 21... Qxe5 22. Re1 $16) 16. Qf2 $1 {The position is already lost. In every variation Black is losing material or getting mated.} (16. Bg5 $1 Bg7 (16... b4 17. Bxf6 bxc3 18. Qg5 cxb2+ 19. Kb1 Nxf6 20. Qxf6 Rg8 (20... Rf8) 21. Ng5 $16) 17. Bh6 $36) 16... b4 17. Ne2 $5 $36 (17. Ne5 Bxe5 18. Qxf7+ Kd8 19. Nxd5 exd5 20. dxe5 {was mentioned by Caruana as unnecessarily messy. He figured this was still very good for him, with Akobian's king still being hunted, but saw no knockout blow and did not want to sacrifice material.} Rf8 21. Qxh7 Rxf1 22. Rxf1 Qe6 (22... Bb7)) (17. Ne4 $1 dxe4 18. Ne5 {was brought to Caruana's attention after the round. He saw similar ideas, though this specific variation did not catch his eye.} Bxe5 (18... Nxe5 $4 19. dxe5 Bxe5 20. Qxf7#) 19. Qxf7+ Kd8 20. dxe5 Kc7 21. Rd6 Qb5 22. Rfd1 $16) 17... b3 18. Ne5 Bxe5 19. Qxf7+ Kd8 20. dxe5 bxa2 21. Kd2 Rf8 22. Qxh7 Rxf1 23. Rxf1 d4 24. Qg8+ { Protecting the g2 pawn, just in case.} Kc7 25. Nxd4 Qd5 26. Qxe6 $18 Qa5+ $2 ( 26... Qxg2+ 27. Rf2 Qxf2+ 28. Bxf2 a1=Q {is an extra rook for Black, but mate ensues} 29. Qd6+ Kb7 30. Qd5+ Kb8 31. Nc6+ Kb7 32. Nd8+ Kc7 33. Qd6+ Kxd8 34. Bh4+ Ke8 35. Qe7#) (26... Bb7 27. Qxd5 (27. Ra1 Rh8 28. Qxd5 (28. Rxa2 c3+ ( 28... Qxg2+ 29. Kc3 $18) 29. Kxc3) 28... Bxd5 29. Bf4) 27... Bxd5 28. Bf4 (28. g3) 28... Nc5 29. Ra1) 27. c3 Nxe5 28. Rf7+ $1 Nxf7 29. Bf4+ Kb7 30. Qxf7+ (30. Qc6+ $2 {seems like it must be winning, since it forces the king to the a-file. Yet this is the way to throw away wins. Instead, Caruana mates.} Ka7 31. Nb5+ axb5 32. Be3+ Kb8 33. Bf4+ Ka7) 1-0 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.04.27"] [Round "8.3"] [White "Giri, Anish"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2777"] [BlackElo "2843"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "86"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Nb6 7. O-O Be7 8. a3 a5 9. d3 O-O 10. Be3 Be6 11. Rc1 a4 12. Nd2 f5 13. Bxb6 cxb6 14. Nxa4 Bg5 15. Nc3 e4 {Up to here this had all been seen in the game Nepomniachtchi-Aronian. Both players knew the game, but Giri revealed that he did not intend to follow it, but found all the moves so far logical.} 16. Kh1 $146 {A novelty.} ({That predecessor saw:} 16. Rb1 Ne5 17. Nb3 Ng4 18. Qc2 Be3 19. dxe4 Qg5 {and the game became "very dirty" according to the Dutch GM, Nepomniachtchi,I (2742)-Aronian,L (2809) Geneva 2017}) 16... Qd7 {Carlsen liked the position and the initiative that he got for the pawn. He also said that the majority of the players will prefer to have the initiative here, rather than the pawn.} 17. Rb1 Rad8 {Ineed Black has obvious moves and pressure along the open files.} 18. Nc4 Qf7 ({Weaker was:} 18... exd3 19. exd3 Qf7 20. f4) 19. b3 ({On} 19. Qa4 {Black planned to play in analogue to the game } exd3 20. exd3 f4 ({Although} 20... Rxd3 {is possible as well.})) 19... exd3 20. exd3 f4 21. Ne4 Be7 22. gxf4 $1 ({Or else the pawn will come in a striking proximity to the white king after} 22. Re1 f3 23. Bf1 Qh5) 22... Qxf4 23. a4 { Giri managed to stabilize the situation. The knights are solidly placed in the center and control a lot of squares. But Carlsen can attack on the dark squares. A lot of weaknesses have been created into White's position, with the h2 pawn being a particularly weak one.} Nb4 24. Qe2 Qh6 {Carlsen keeps mounting pressure.} ({Cashing out too soon may lead to drawish positions after } 24... Nxd3 25. Rbd1 Nb4 26. Rxd8 Bxd8 27. Ned6 Bd7 28. Bxb7) ({Or} 24... Rxd3 25. Ng5 Bxc4 26. Qxe7) 25. Rbd1 ({The world champion expected instead:} 25. Qe3 Qxe3 26. fxe3 {when he has a pleasant choice between:} Rxd3 {"It’s more ugly than bad, I thought." (Carlsen)} ({Or} 26... Rxf1+ 27. Bxf1 Nxd3)) (25. Bf3 Nxd3) 25... Nd5 26. Rg1 (26. Bf3 {looks worse after} Nf4 (26... Rf4 $5) 27. Qe3 Qh3 {for example} 28. Rg1 Nd5 29. Bg2 Nxe3 30. Bxh3 Bxc4 31. bxc4 Nxd1 { and Black wins the exchange.}) 26... Kh8 ({The immediate} 26... Rf4 $5 { was also OK.}) 27. Bf1 Rf4 {Shifting more pieces towards the kingside.} 28. Ne5 {White also prepares for the battle on the right part of the board.} Rdf8 ({ To me the immediate} 28... Rh4 {looks more precise as after} 29. f3 {Black has the additional resource} Ne3 30. Rd2 Nf5 {with advantage.}) 29. f3 Rh4 30. d4 { Both white knights are perfect but Carlsen keeps playing around them.} Nf4 ({If } 30... Qf4 31. Qg2) 31. Qd2 Bxb3 {Finally grabbing some pawns in return for the activity.} 32. Rb1 Bxa4 33. Bb5 $1 {But everything comes with a price. Giri gets rid of the powerful bishop and keeps his good pieces on board.} Bxb5 34. Rxb5 Qe6 {Carlsen intends to bring the bishop to c7 to attack the h2 pawn again.} (34... Bd8 35. d5 $1) 35. Qb2 {At the press conference Giri felt that he has good chances to hold if he just stays.} ({This might indeed be the case, but he has to do it extremely carefully. A good set up seems} 35. Rgb1 Bd8 36. Re1 $1 {The point is that} Bc7 {can be met with} ({And} 36... Qh6 $4 {even loses to} 37. Ng5 $1 Bxg5 38. Nf7+ $1) 37. Ng5) 35... Bd8 36. Ng5 {This makes things easier for Black.} ({But it is not certain that White can survive after } 36. Qd2 Bc7 37. Rc1 Qe8) 36... Qe8 $1 {Missed by Giri.} 37. Rb3 ({The last chance according to Giri was} 37. d5 {but this loses to} Rh5 $1 ({Not} 37... Bf6 38. d6 Nd3 39. d7 Nxb2 40. dxe8=Q Rxe8 41. Rxb2 Bxe5 42. Re2 {with a likely draw.}) 38. Ne6 Bf6 $1 {and Black wins.} ({Again Black needs to be careful-} 38... Nxe6 39. dxe6 Bf6 40. Nf7+ {gives the advantage to White.})) 37... Bxg5 38. Rxg5 Ne6 {Also missed by White. Now it all ends quickly.} 39. Rg4 Rxg4 40. fxg4 Qd8 41. Rh3 ({Only here did White realize that} 41. Rd3 { is neatly refuted after} Qd5+ 42. Kg1 Rf1+ $1 43. Kxf1 Qh1+ 44. Kf2 Qxh2+) ({ The pawn endgame is also lost after} 41. Rf3 Rxf3 (41... Qd5 42. Qb3) 42. Nxf3 Qd5 43. Kg2 Ng5 44. Qe2 Qxf3+ 45. Qxf3 Nxf3 46. Kxf3 Kg8 {due to the distant passed pawn(s).}) 41... Qd5+ 42. Kg1 Qe4 43. Qb4 Rf6 0-1 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.05.04"] [Round "2.1"] [White "Tan, Zhongyi"] [Black "Ju, Wenjun"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A21"] [WhiteElo "2522"] [BlackElo "2571"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "110"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Bb4 {A sort of Advanced Rossolimo line with reversed colors.} 3. d3 {Already quite a rare move.} (3. Nd5 {to make use of the bishop's position at once is more common, for example:} a5 4. Nf3 d6 5. a3 Bc5 6. e3 Nf6 7. d4 Nxd5 8. cxd5 exd4 9. exd4 Bb6 10. Bg5 f6 11. Be3 {as in Cheparinov,I (2702)-Li,S (2519) China 2018}) 3... Bxc3+ 4. bxc3 d6 5. g3 f5 6. Bg2 Nf6 7. Rb1 ({Or:} 7. Nf3 O-O 8. O-O c5 9. Nd2 Nc6 10. f4 Be6 11. e4 exf4 12. Rxf4 Qd7 {with approximately equal game in Krylov,M (2476)-Volovikov,A (2271) Serpukhov 2018}) 7... c6 8. Nf3 Qc7 9. O-O O-O 10. Bg5 $146 {A novelty, which does not give anything substantial to White.} ({In the only predecessor Black got excellent position after:} 10. Qb3 c5 11. Ng5 (11. Nh4 $5) 11... Nc6 12. Qb5 h6 13. Nh3 Na5 14. f4 e4 15. Nf2 Bd7 16. Qb2 Bc6 {Ehlert,H (1923)-Gross,T (2152) Verden 2008}) 10... Nbd7 11. Nd2 h6 12. Bxf6 Nxf6 {Ju can be happy with her opening.The only potential problem of b7 is well covered. While Black can easily advance her kingside pawns. In fact it seems easier to be Black here as her moves are more obvious.} 13. e4 Be6 {One of the good moves that Black has.} ({Both} 13... f4) ({And} 13... fxe4 14. Nxe4 Be6 {lead to perfectly comforatble positions for the second player.}) 14. Bh3 Qd7 15. exf5 Bxf5 16. Bxf5 Qxf5 17. Ne4 ({Perhaps Tan should have forced matters with:} 17. Rxb7 Qxd3 18. Nb3 Qxd1 ({Less convincing is:} 18... Qxc3 19. Qxd6 Qxc4 20. Qxe5) ({Or} 18... Qxc4 19. Qxd6 Qxc3 20. Qe7 {with advantage for White.}) 19. Rxd1 Ne4 20. Re1 Nxc3 21. c5 $1 {with equality. For instance:} Rf7 22. Rxf7 Kxf7 23. cxd6 Ke6 24. Re3 Nd5 25. Nd4+ Kxd6 26. Nf5+) 17... Qd7 18. Qb3 Nxe4 19. dxe4 Rf7 $1 {Now Black is definitely better. She can defend the weakness on b7 sideways, while attacking. White has a bunch of weak pawns and what is more important-her king is not as safe as it seems.} 20. Rfd1 ({After} 20. c5 dxc5 21. Qc4 {Black can keep the pawn with} b6 22. a4 Qe7) 20... Qg4 $5 {Aggressive play.} ({On} 20... b6 {White has} 21. c5 $1 bxc5 22. Rd2 {followed by the doubling on the d-file and compensation for a pawn.}) 21. Rxd6 Qe2 {Another cunning move, which tries to force a concession.} ({Also good was the immediate capture:} 21... Qxe4 {when White has to be extremely careful. For example:} 22. Rbd1 $2 {leads to trouble after:} ({When White needs to defend with} 22. Rd2 $1) 22... Rxf2 $1 23. Kxf2 Rf8+ 24. Kg1 Qe3+ {And if} 25. Kg2 $2 {White gets mated with} ({Now best defense is:} 25. Kh1 $1 Rf2 26. c5+ Kh7 27. Rxh6+ Qxh6 28. Qb1+ Qg6 {although White still needs to work hard to save the half point.}) 25... Rf2+ 26. Kh3 Qe2 27. Rd8+ Kh7 28. Qb1+ e4) 22. Rf1 $2 { A very unfortunate decision. Passive defense with only heavy pieces on the board is a sin.} ({Correct was:} 22. Qb2 $1 Qxe4 23. c5) ({Or even:} 22. Rb2 $1 {despite the loss of a pawn with a check after:} Qe1+ 23. Kg2 Qxe4+ 24. Kg1 { White can still defend.}) 22... Raf8 {Now the White pieces are stuck and Tan has to give material back without getting any relief in return as she cannot expell the black pieces from their active ppositions.} 23. c5 ({Or} 23. Qd1 Qxa2) 23... Kh7 24. Qd1 Qxa2 25. Qb1 Qc4 26. Rd2 a5 $1 {Ju keeps the queens on the board.} ({Weaker was} 26... Qxc5 27. Qb4 Qxb4 28. cxb4 {with chances for White to defend the rook endgame.}) 27. Qb6 Qxc3 28. Rb2 ({After} 28. Ra2 { Black can either defend the pawn} Ra8 ({Or even better push it} 28... a4 {as} 29. Rxa4 $2 {fails to} Rxf2 $1 30. Rxf2 Qe1+ 31. Kg2 Rxf2+ 32. Kh3 Qf1+ 33. Kg4 Qe2+ 34. Kh4 Rxh2#)) 28... h5 {Looking for a second weakness on the kingside.} ({Also good was} 28... Rd7 29. Ra2 Ra8) 29. Ra2 ({The weakness is obvious after } 29. h4 Qd4 30. Ra2 Rf3 31. Kg2 Qxe4) 29... a4 ({No time for} 29... h4 30. Qxa5) 30. Qb2 ({Once again the pawn is poisoned-} 30. Rxa4 $2 Rxf2 31. Rxf2 Qe1+ 32. Kg2 Rxf2+ 33. Kh3 Qf1+ 34. Kh4 Rxh2+ 35. Kg5 Qf6#) 30... Qxc5 ({ Since the position changed a bit, there was an argument for} 30... Qxb2 31. Rxb2 Ra8 32. Ra1 Ra5 {This time with good winning chances for Black as she can actively use her rook on the a5 square.}) 31. Rxa4 g6 {Ju won a pawn and achieved close to won positon. But in the coming moves lets the advantage slip away.} ({Here both} 31... Rf3 $1 32. Rb4 b5) ({And} 31... b5 $1 {looked great for Black when the win should be a matter of time.}) 32. Qd2 Kg7 33. Ra5 Qd4 ( 33... b5 {is no longer as convincing after} 34. Ra6) 34. Qxd4 exd4 35. f4 { Finally a rook endgame emerged but one in which Black's extra pawn is not felt seriously. Both white rooks are good, and so are her kingside pawns.} Rd8 36. Kf2 b6 37. Ra6 c5 (37... Rb7 {is too passive and allows no winning chances after} 38. Rb1 Rdb8 39. Ke2) 38. Rxb6 Ra7 39. f5 $2 {A nervous move, most likely in time trouble.} ({After the correct} 39. Rc6 $1 {White should hold. For example:} Ra2+ 40. Kf3 Ra3+ 41. Kf2 Rc3 42. Ra1 d3 43. e5 c4 44. Ra7+ Kh6 45. Raa6 d2 46. Rxg6+ Kh7 47. Rh6+ Kg8 48. Rag6+ Kf8 ({Not} 48... Kf7 $4 49. e6+ Ke7 50. Rh7+ Kd6 51. e7+ {when it is White who wins.}) 49. Rh8+ {with a curious draw after} Kf7 50. Rf6+ Kg7 51. Rxd8 Rd3 52. Rfd6 d1=Q 53. R8d7+) 39... gxf5 40. exf5 {The white passer is not dangerous as it is nicely blocked by the black king, whereas the black pawn duo marches fast.} d3 41. Rc6 Ra2+ { A nasty little check.} 42. Kf3 (42. Ke1 {loses to} Rb8 $1) ({If} 42. Ke3 Re2+ 43. Kf4 (43. Kf3 Rd5) 43... d2 {would also see the black pawns promote soon.}) 42... d2 {Back is perfectly co-ordinated and after some careful moves the contender converted the advantage.} 43. Rc7+ Kf6 44. Rc6+ Ke7 ({Avoiding the trap-} 44... Kxf5 $2 45. Rxc5+ Kg6 46. Rc6+ Kf7 47. Ke2+ Kg8 48. Rd1) 45. Rd1 ( 45. f6+ {does not help after} Kf7) 45... Rc2 46. h3 c4 47. g4 hxg4+ 48. hxg4 Rc1 49. Ke2 c3 50. Rc7+ Kf6 51. Rc6+ Kg5 52. Kf3 Rg8 $1 {Caution is required even in completely won positions.} (52... Rxd1 $4 {would have let the win slip away after} 53. Rg6+ Kh4 54. Rh6+ Kg5 55. Rg6+) 53. Ke2 Rh8 54. Rd6 Rxd1 55. Kxd1 Rh1+ 0-1 [Event "Altibox Norway Chess"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2018.06.02"] [Round "5.2"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "Karjakin, Sergey"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A28"] [WhiteElo "2822"] [BlackElo "2782"] [Annotator "Hess, R"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [WhiteTeam "United States"] [BlackTeam "Russia"] [WhiteTeamCountry "USA"] [BlackTeamCountry "RUS"] [WhiteClock "1:30:59"] [BlackClock "1:13:23"] {Caruana, fresh off a second straight rest day due to Ding Liren's unfortunate accident, was having a rough stretch. In the Bundesliga playoff he was outplayed by an impressive Giri. In three rounds of Norway Chess, he sat at just 1/3 with an uninspiring defeat to the man he will challenge in five months for the world championship title. Is this win the start of a turnaround for the world number two? His fans certainly hope so.} 1. c4 {Already an interesting choice by Caruana, who infrequently opts for the English. There's no doubt he wanted revenge on Karjakin, who beat him during round 12 of the Candidates.} Nf6 2. Nc3 e5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. e3 Bb4 5. Qc2 Bxc3 (5... O-O 6. Nd5) 6. Qxc3 Qe7 7. b3 (7. Be2 d5 8. cxd5 Nxd5 9. Qb3 Nb6 10. d3 Bg4 11. Bd2 O-O-O 12. Rc1 f5 {Oleksienko,M (2615)-Navara,D (2726) Germany 2018}) 7... O-O (7... d5 {seems like a principled reply here. White is underdeveloped, which means a strike in the center is well-timed. After all, Karjakin committed to this break (he didn't really have active play if not for it) later in the game. However, the clear drawback is that White can begin opening up the position for his bishops.} 8. d4 {challenges Black's setup, attempting to open diagonals for the two bishops.} (8. Bb2 d4) 8... Ne4 9. Qb2 Be6 {among other variations is an interesting start.}) 8. Bb2 Re8 9. a3 a5 10. h3 $146 (10. d3 d5 11. cxd5 Nxd5 12. Qc2 Bg4 13. Be2 Rad8 14. O-O Rd6 15. Qc4 Qd7 16. Rac1 Nb6 17. Qc2 Rg6 {Van Wely,L (2570)-Piket,J (2570) Wijk aan Zee 1996}) 10... b6 { "A little bit slow." (Caruana)} (10... d5 11. cxd5 Nxd5 12. Qc2 e4 13. Nd4 Nxd4 14. Bxd4 Qg5 15. Bc4 c6 {and I can even consider castling queenside (Caruana). The bishop on d4 is a dominant, unopposed piece, but Black is in no immediate danger. Karjakin would have counter chances here that he did not get in the game.}) 11. Be2 ({Too risky is} 11. g4 Bb7 12. Rg1 {Agdestein/Mamedyarov} d5 13. g5 d4 $1 {appears to have been overlooked by the commentators.} (13... Ne4 14. Qc2) 14. gxf6 dxc3 (14... Qxf6 15. Qc2 Qxf3 16. Bg2 Qh5) 15. fxe7 cxb2 16. Rb1 e4 17. Nd4 Ne5 {and Black is much better.}) 11... Bb7 12. O-O d5 {"This kind of surprised me." (Caruana)} (12... e4 13. Nd4 (13. Nh4) 13... Nxd4 14. exd4 {and now} (14. Qxd4) 14... d5 {blockading the long diagonal.}) 13. cxd5 Nxd5 14. Qc2 e4 15. Nh2 {Great understanding by Caruana. His knight currently sits awkwardly on h2, but importantly the knight on c6 is misplaced because it prevents the c7 pawn from pushing to c5. Black can't play Ne5 since the e4 pawn will hang.} (15. Nd4 Nxd4 16. Bxd4 c5 17. Bb2 Qg5 (17... Rad8)) 15... Qg5 (15... Ne5 16. Qxe4 Nc3 17. Qxb7 Nxe2+ (17... Reb8 18. Qxb8+ Rxb8 19. Bxc3) ( 17... Rab8 18. Qa6) 18. Kh1 {"The knight is trapped." (Caruana)} Nd3 19. Qf3 Nxb2 20. Qxe2 {"And now the other knight is trapped." (Caruana)}) (15... Rad8 16. f4 (16. f3 Rd6 17. fxe4 Qxe4) 16... exf3 (16... Rd6 17. Ng4) 17. Nxf3 { is an even better version.}) 16. f4 exf3 17. Nxf3 Qg3 {More clever.} 18. Rf2 Rad8 19. Bc4 Nf6 {"This surprised me. It can't be good. It's kind of admitting that your position is bad." (Caruana)} (19... Rd6 20. Raf1 (20. Qf5 Bc8 (20... Qg6 21. Nh4) 21. Qg5 Qxg5 22. Nxg5 {and Black can keep fighting, despite the poor position of his pieces.}) 20... Nf6 21. e4 {with overwhelming pressure down the f-file.} (21. Qf5 Bc8 22. Qg5 Qxg5 23. Nxg5 {is just crushing.})) 20. Bxf6 (20. Raf1 Rd6 21. e4 $1 {and the pawn is immune to capture, since} Nxe4 22. Bxf7+ {is devastating.}) 20... gxf6 21. Raf1 (21. Bxf7+ Kxf7 22. Qxh7+ Ke6 $1 {and I didn't see a continuation." (Caruana)} (22... Kf8 23. Nh4) (22... Qg7 23. Ng5+ Kf8 24. Rxf6+ Qxf6 25. Rf1)) 21... Rd6 22. b4 (22. Bxf7+ Kxf7 23. Qxh7+ Qg7 24. Ng5+ Kf8 {is promising for White, though the knockout blow still requires some work. After all, White has sacrificed a piece for soon-to-be 3 pawns!}) 22... axb4 23. axb4 Re7 {"This leads to a sad situation." (Caruana)} ( {Caruana thought he should have tried} 23... Nxb4 24. Bxf7+ Kxf7 25. Qxc7+ Kg8 (25... Re7 26. Ng5+ Qxg5 (26... Ke8 27. Qb8+) 27. Qxd6 Nd5 28. Rf5 Qxg2+ 29. Kxg2) 26. Qxb7 Nd3 27. Nd4 Nxf2 {and he wasn't sure about this, but apparently he missed} 28. Nf5 $1 {here which wins on the spot.}) (23... Kh8 {is an attempt to rush the rook to the g-file. Unfortunately, it costs either the c- or f- pawn.} 24. Be2 (24. Bxf7 Re7 25. Qc4) 24... Rg8 25. b5 Ne5 26. d4 $1 { when the g2 pawn gets the reinforcement it needs from the queen on c2.}) 24. b5 Ne5 25. Nd4 Bc8 (25... Nxc4 26. Qxc4 {"He just doesn't have counterplay." (Caruana)} (26. Nf5 {first ends the game immediately.}) 26... Be4 27. Qe2) 26. Kh1 Kg7 {Here "I was sure I would find a way to break through." (Caruana)} 27. Be2 Kh8 28. Qc3 ({Caruana was a bit worried about stuff like} 28. Bf3 Bxh3 29. gxh3 (29. Ne2 Qg6 30. Qxg6 fxg6 31. gxh3 Rxd2 {with pretty good drawing chances.}) 29... Qxh3+ 30. Kg1 Rxd4 31. exd4 Qg3+ (31... Nxf3+ 32. Rxf3 Qg4+ 33. Kf2)) 28... Kg7 29. Bd1 Kg8 30. Bc2 Qh4 31. Rf4 Qg3 32. Bf5 Bb7 33. Be4 Bc8 {Karjakin can't afford a bishop trade, since the f5 square is impossible to defend.} 34. Qa3 (34. Qa1) 34... Kg7 (34... Re8 35. Qa8 Rdd8 36. Nc6 Nxc6 37. Qxc6 {is easily winning.}) 35. Qa8 Bxh3 {Desperation in a lost position.} ({ After} 35... Bd7 36. Qd8 (36. Bf5 {forces the bishops off, which means the f5 square is White's for the taking.}) 36... Ng6 {Caruana was considering} 37. R4f3 {but that would be bad because of} (37. Qxd7 {secures two minors for the rook.} Rdxd7 (37... Qxf4 38. Nf5+ Kf8 39. Qxe7+ Nxe7 40. Rxf4) 38. Nf5+ Kf8 39. Nxg3 Nxf4 40. exf4 Rxd2 {with a winning advantage for White. The minor pieces are too strong, especially as the bishop plants itself on c6.}) 37... Qe5) 36. gxh3 Qxh3+ 37. Kg1 Rxd4 38. Bg2 Qg3 39. Rxd4 Ng4 40. Rf3 Qe1+ 41. Bf1 1-0 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.06.02"] [Round "?"] [White "Karjakin, Sergey "] [Black "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime "] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D87"] [Annotator "user"] [PlyCount "75"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 ({ Альтернативные пути:} 7. Nf3 c5 8. Be3 Qa5 9. Qd2 (9. Bd2) 9... Nc6 ({или} 9... Bg4)) ({и} 7. Be3 c5 8. Qd2 {.}) 7... c5 8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O {Диаграмма} b6 ({Популярна следующая линия.} 10... Bg4 11. f3 {.} ({Черных устраивает вариант} 11. d5 Na5 12. Bd3 c4 13. Bc2 Bxc3 {.}) 11... Na5 ({встречается и} 11... Bd7) 12. Bd3 {.} ({ Анатолий Карпов и Гарри Каспаров (матч на первенство мира 1987, Севилья) испытывали продолжение} 12. Bxf7+ Rxf7 13. fxg4 Rxf1+ 14. Kxf1 Qd6 15. Kg1 {.} ({Другая возможность:} 15. e5 Qd5 16. Bf2 Rf8 17. Kg1 Bh6 18. dxc5 Qxe5 19. Qd3 Qf6 20. Rf1 Qe6 $1 21. Nd4 Qxa2 22. Qe4 Rf7 $11 { (Каспаров).}) 15... Qe6 16. Qd3 Qc4 {. У черных компенсация за пешку.}) 12... cxd4 13. cxd4 Be6 14. d5 ({ еще вариант:} 14. Rc1 Bxa2 15. Qa4 Be6 16. d5 Bd7 17. Qb4 e6) 14... Bxa1 15. Qxa1 f6 {. У белых инициатива за качество.}) 11. dxc5 Qc7 12. Nd4 Ne5 13. Nb5 Qb8 14. Be2 ({Возможно} 14. Bd5 Ng4 15. g3 Nxe3 16. fxe3 {. Черным лучше продолжать} a6 ({ либо} 16... Bh3 {.}) ({Последовавшее в партии Маттиас Блюбаум - Спиридон Наэм (ч-т мира до 20 лет, Афины 2012, 1-0)} 16... Bb7 $2 {привело к разгрому:} 17. c6 Ba6 18. Rxf7 $1 Rxf7 19. Bxf7+ Kxf7 20. Qd5+ Kf8 21. Rf1+ Bf6 22. c7 Qe8 23. Rxf6+ Kg7 24. Rc6 Bb7 25. Qe5+ Kf7 26. Re6 Qf8 27. Rxe7+ $1 Kg8 28. Qe6+ Kh8 29. Rf7 Qh6 30. Rf3 Rc8 31. Nd6 Rxc7 32. Qe8+ Kg7 33. Qf8#)) {Диаграмма} 14... bxc5 $1 {Новинка.} ({ Недостаточно для уравнения последовавшее в партии Райнер Кнаак - Любомир Фтачник (Братислава 1983, 1-0)} 14... a6 $6 15. Na3 {.}) 15. Rb1 ({После } 15. Bxc5 a6 {у черных хорошая компенсация за пешку.}) 15... a6 16. Na3 Qc7 17. f4 Rd8 18. Qc2 Ng4 19. Bxg4 Bxg4 20. f5 gxf5 21. Nc4 e6 22. h3 Bh5 23. exf5 exf5 24. Bg5 f4 {Максим освобождает диагональ для белопольного слона.} 25. Qf2 ({После} 25. Bxd8 Rxd8 {черные слоны компенсируют качество.}) {Диаграмма Действия соперников до этого момента трудно усилить. Француз ошибается.} 25... f3 $2 ({ Наиболее жесткая реакция -} 25... Rd4 $5 {с такими вариантами. 1)} 26. Bxf4 ({2)} 26. Nb6 Re8 27. Qh4 Re2 28. cxd4 Bxd4+ 29. Kh2 $1 ({проигрывает} 29. Kh1 $2 {ввиду} f3 30. g3 Qe5 $1) 29... Qc6 30. Rg1 Bg6 31. Bxf4 Bxb1 32. Qg4+ Bg6 33. Qxe2 Bxg1+ 34. Kxg1 Qxb6 {с ничейным эндшпилем.}) 26... Rxf4 27. Qxf4 Qxf4 28. Rxf4 Bxc3 {. В этом остром окончании шансы белых несколько выше.}) ({Удовлетворительно } 25... Re8 {.}) 26. Bxd8 Rxd8 27. Qh4 fxg2 28. Rfe1 Bf3 29. Re3 Bc6 30. Rbe1 Rf8 31. Ne5 Bd5 {Диаграмма} 32. Rg3 $1 {Грозит взятие на g7.} f6 $1 {Единственная защита.} ({На} 32... Kh8 $2 { решает} 33. Rxg7 Kxg7 34. Qg5+ Kh8 35. Qf6+ Kg8 36. Ng4 {.}) ({Не помогает} 32... f5 $2 {ввиду} 33. Nd7 $1 Qxd7 34. Re7 {.}) 33. Nd3 Bxa2 $2 {Проигрывает без борьбы.} ({Упорнее} 33... Kh8 {. Правда, после} 34. Nf4 Bf7 35. Rxg2 {белые близки к цели.} (35. Rxg7 $2 Kxg7 36. Qg3+ Kh6 $1 {упускает перевес})) ({или} 33... Bf7) 34. c4 $1 Qd6 35. Nf4 Qd4+ 36. Kh2 Bxc4 {Диаграмма} 37. Qh6 $1 {Карякин использует связку.} f5 38. Nh5 1-0 [Event "Altibox Norway Chess"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2018.06.05"] [Round "7.3"] [White "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "0-1"] [WhiteElo "2789"] [BlackElo "2760"] [Annotator "Hess, R"] [PlyCount "80"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [WhiteTeam "France"] [BlackTeam "India"] [WhiteTeamCountry "FRA"] [BlackTeamCountry "IND"] {In recent years, Viswanathan Anand has been counted out many times. His rating has dropped to 2760 and out of the world top 10, yet he won a World Rapid title. Even as he approaches 50 years old, no player can underestimate him, lest they fall victim to a game like this. Against MVL in Norway, Anand's play was practically perfect.} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5 8. dxe5 Be6 9. c3 Be7 (9... Bc5 {was played by Anand over 20 (!) years ago in games against Kamsky and Polgar. A quick filter of top games in this line indicate it's an outdated option. Anand did defeat Sethuraman from the White side of this line at the 2017 Isle of Man tournament. }) 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. Re1 Nc5 12. Nd4 Nxd4 13. cxd4 Nd3 (13... Nxb3 {is a bad decision, since the bishop on b3 stares into a wall. White quickly prevents Black from playing ...c5, leaving him with a permanent weakness in the form of a backward pawn.} 14. Nxb3) 14. Re3 Nf4 {The knight's tour continues. Anand is not ceding control of the c-file that easily!} ({MVL had mainly looked at the following game, where Black seemed to have several opportunities to improve with ...c5 breaks:} 14... Nxc1 15. Rxc1 a5 16. f4 g6 17. a4 Rb8 18. Bc2 Qc8 19. Nb3 bxa4 20. Nxa5 c5 {Short,N (2656)-Tukhaev,A (2551) Kolkata 2018}) 15. Nf3 Bg4 16. h3 Bh5 17. Rc3 $146 (17. Bc2 Ne6 18. Bf5 c5 19. dxc5 Bxc5 20. Rd3 Qb6 21. Be3 Bxe3 22. Rxe3 d4 23. Re1 Rad8 {Ye,J (2545)-Norri,J (2400) Helsinki 1992 }) 17... Ne6 18. g4 (18. Be3 f5 {may look similar to a possibility in the game, but after} 19. exf6 Bxf6 20. g4 {Black has additional space for the bishop on the retreating diagonal.} Be8) 18... Bg6 19. Be3 {MVL's last few moves aim to prevent ...c5.} a5 (19... f5 20. exf6 Bxf6 21. Rac1 {remains a fight, but perhaps Black would prefer to have control of the c6 square with the bishop on e8.}) 20. Bc2 ({MVL didn't like} 20. Rac1 c5 21. dxc5 b4 22. R3c2 Bxc2 23. Rxc2 d4 24. Bxd4 a4 25. Bxe6 fxe6) 20... Bb4 21. Rb3 f5 22. exf6 (22. a3 Be7 23. Rxb5 fxg4 24. Bxg6 gxf3 {is extremely suspicious for White, whose king is exposed beyond repair.}) (22. Qb1 {is one of those weird moves hoping to pile up on the diagonal, but Black has tactical resources because of White's overextended kingside.} f4 (22... c5 23. gxf5 Bh5 {is extremely messy.}) 23. Bxg6 hxg6 24. Qxg6 (24. Bc1 c5) 24... Ra6 $1) 22... Bxc2 23. Qxc2 Qxf6 24. Ne5 c5 $1 {Anand has great foresight here; he could have kept material level and played for an attack on the kingside, but he holds nothing back.} (24... Rad8 25. Nc6 (25. Qf5 {leads to an ending where White has decent drawing chances, but it'd be a tough road ahead.}) 25... Rd6 26. Nxb4 axb4 {is bad for White. The knight on e6 absolutely dominates the big pawn on e3, and White's shaky kingside does him no favors.} 27. Rxb4) 25. Nd7 (25. a3 a4 26. Rxb4 (26. Rd3 cxd4 27. Nd7 Qg6 $1 28. Nxf8 Rxf8 {when the pin on the rook is devastating.} 29. axb4 dxe3 30. fxe3 Ng5) 26... cxb4 27. Nd7 Qf3 28. Nxf8 Rxf8 29. Qc6 Nf4 ( 29... Ng5 30. Bxg5 Qxf2+ {is no less than an immediate repetition, though Black can certainly play on with} 31. Kh1 Qxb2) 30. Bxf4 Rxf4 {is better for Black, though White can try to survive the endgame after} 31. Qe8+ Rf8 32. Qe6+ Kh8 33. Qe3 {where Black is much preferred in a number of continuations.}) 25... Qf7 (25... Qh4 26. Nxf8 Rxf8 27. dxc5 Qxh3 $6 (27... Rf3 28. Qd1 Rg3+ 29. fxg3 Qxg3+ {leads to a forced draw:} 30. Kf1 Qxh3+ 31. Kf2 (31. Ke2 $4 Qg2+ 32. Kd3 Nxc5+ 33. Bxc5 Qe4#) 31... Qh2+ 32. Kf3 Qh3+) 28. Qd1 {Anand}) 26. Nxf8 Rxf8 27. Qf5 $6 (27. a3 c4 (27... a4 28. Rxb4 cxb4) 28. axb4 cxb3 29. Qxb3 { "In hindsight this is what I should have done: look for equality." (MVL). He certainly has a point, but it's always an uphill battle.} (29. Qc6 a4 30. Qxd5 Nf4 {The outside passed pawn and permanent threat of a4-a3 is trouble for White.}) 29... Qf3 {keeps Anand in charge, despite the temporary pawn deficit.} ) 27... cxd4 28. Qxf7+ Rxf7 29. Rxb4 ({Both players missed} 29. a3 $1 Nc5 30. Rxb4 axb4 31. Bxd4 Nb3 32. Rd1 {with equality.}) (29. Bc1 Nc5 30. Rg3 Ne4) 29... axb4 30. Bd2 {"Somehow I thought this was fine for me but I forgot about b3 completely." (MVL)} b3 {After this, Anand's path to victory was pretty straightforward.} 31. axb3 Rf3 32. b4 (32. Ra3 Rxh3 33. b4 Rxa3 34. bxa3 { is a winning ending for Black, thanks to ideas with ...d3 as well as the outside h-pawn.}) 32... Rd3 33. Re1 Kf7 34. Bc1 Rxh3 35. Re5 Rd3 36. Kf1 Rd1+ 37. Re1 Rxe1+ 38. Kxe1 g6 39. f4 Nd8 40. g5 Ke6 0-1 [Event "?"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.06.04"] [Round "?"] [White "So, Wesley "] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus "] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D13"] [Annotator "user"] [PlyCount "87"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. cxd5 cxd5 4. Bf4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Nf3 {Диаграмма } a6 {Магнус играл так с Грантом Мелкумяном (ч-т мира по блиц, Эр-Рияд 2017, 0-1).} ({Ведущие гроссмейстеры чаще предпочитали} 6... Bf5 {.}) ({ Стоит отметить ход} 6... Nh5 {, принесший победу Яну Непомнящему над Магнусом Карлсеном (Лондон 2017).}) 7. Rc1 Bf5 8. e3 Rc8 9. Be2 e6 10. O-O Nd7 ({Альтернатива -} 10... Bd6 {.}) 11. Na4 Be7 { Диаграмма} 12. h3 $5 {Новинка.} ({На} 12. a3 {черные создают контригру путем} g5 $1 13. Bg3 h5 {.}) ({ Встречалось и} 12. Nc5 {.}) 12... O-O ({Пешечное наступление} 12... g5 $5 13. Bh2 h5 {происходит в лучшей для белых редакции, но вполне возможно.} 14. Kh1) 13. a3 Na5 14. Nc5 $1 Nc4 {Карлсен отвечает симметрично.} (14... Nxc5 15. dxc5 Rxc5 $4 16. Rxc5 Bxc5 17. b4 {проигрывает фигуру}) 15. b4 {Диаграмма} Nxc5 $6 {Малозаметная неточность.} ({Шансы на уравнение давало поддержание симметрии:} 15... b5 $1 16. a4 $5 a5 $1 {.}) 16. dxc5 Nxa3 17. Nd4 Be4 18. f3 Bg6 19. Qb3 Nc4 20. Bxc4 dxc4 21. Qxc4 {Диаграмма} Qe8 $5 {Ферзь стал в засаду, чтобы подготовить освобождающий удар е6-е5.} ({Логичен размен чернопольных слонов} 21... Bg5 {, попутно оживляя ферзя. Сильнейшая реакция -} 22. Rfd1 $1 ({В случае естественной игры белых -} 22. Bxg5 Qxg5 23. e4 Rfd8 24. Nb3 {- черным удается создать контригру путем } Qe3+ 25. Kh1 b5 $1 26. Qc2 f5 $1 {.}) 22... Bxf4 23. exf4 Qf6 24. Nb3 Rfd8 25. Na5 b5 26. Qe2 Qxf4 {Диаграмма} 27. Nc6 $1 Re8 28. Qe5 {. За пешку у белых доминирующая позиция.}) 22. Bg3 $1 {Уэсли не торопится.} ({Идейно выглядит подрыв} 22. c6 {, однако в варианте} e5 $1 23. Bxe5 bxc6 24. Nxc6 Bxb4 25. Qxb4 Rxc6 26. Qd4 f6 27. Qd5+ Re6 {черные близки к спасению.}) ({Другой вариант -} 22. Rfd1 e5 $1 23. Bxe5 Bxc5 24. bxc5 Qxe5 25. e4 {. Максимум, чего здесь могут достичь белые, - разменять одну пешку на две после прорыва с6-с5. Но даже в этом случае с тремя пехотинцами против четверых на одном фланге черные получат большие шансы на ничью.}) 22... e5 23. Nb3 $1 ({Со не соблазняется пешкой, поскольку после} 23. Bxe5 $6 Bxc5 24. bxc5 Qxe5 {его преимущество испаряется.}) {Диаграмма} 23... Bd8 $2 {Ведет к проигранной позиции.} ({Черным необходимо активизировать белопольного слона. Рассмотрим возможные варианты.} 23... Bf5 24. Bxe5 $1 {(здесь уже надо бить)} Be6 25. Qc3 Bxb3 26. Qxb3 Bxc5 27. Rxc5 Rxc5 28. Bxg7 $1 {. У белых перевес. Для уточнения его размеров требуется объемный анализ.}) (23... Kh8 $6 24. Bxe5 Bxc5 25. Bxg7+ Kxg7 26. Qc3+ $1 f6 27. bxc5 {. Белые стоят на выигрыш.}) ({Лучшая защита -} 23... h6 $1 {. Игра может развиваться следующим образом:} 24. e4 Kh7 $1 25. Bxe5 Bxc5+ 26. Nxc5 Qxe5 27. Qd5 ({в случае} 27. f4 Qe7 28. f5 Bh5 {слон ускользает }) 27... Qf4 28. Qxb7 {Диаграмма} a5 $1 {Спасительный подрыв. Амбициознее} 29. Kh1 $1 ({Продолжение} 29. bxa5 $6 Rxc5 30. Rxc5 Qe3+ 31. Kh1 Qxc5 32. a6 Qa3 33. a7 f5 $1 34. e5 Bf7 $1 { ведет к позиционной ничьей.}) ({В случае} 29. Qb6 {черные изыскивают динамические ресурсы:} Rfd8 $1 30. bxa5 {.} ({Неудачно} 30. Qxa5 $2 Ra8 $1 31. Na6 Rd2 32. Kh1 f5 $1 33. e5 $2 Qg5 34. Rg1 Rxg2 $1 35. Rxg2 Qxc1+ {. Черные создают решающие угрозы.}) 30... Rd2 $1 ({на} 30... Rb8 $6 {перевес дает перекрытие} 31. Nb7 $1) 31. Nd3 Qg5 32. Nf2 Rxc1 33. Rxc1 Rxf2 34. Kxf2 Qd2+ 35. Kg3 Qg5+ 36. Kh2 Qf4+ {с вечным шахом.}) 29... Rb8 {.} ({Продолжение} 29... Qe3 30. Rcd1 $1 axb4 31. Nd7 {ведет к аналогичной ситуации.}) ({Красив вариант} 29... Rfd8 $5 30. bxa5 {.} ( {Вероятно, сильнее} 30. Nd3 $1 Rxc1 31. Nxf4 Rxf1+ 32. Kh2 { . Скорее всего позиция черных защитима, но нужен отдельный анализ.}) 30... Rb8 $1 31. Qe7 Rd2 32. Rcd1 Rc2 33. Rg1 Rb5 $1 34. Nd7 Rh5 $1 35. Nf8+ Kg8 36. Qd7 {Диаграмма} Bf5 $1 37. Qxf5 (37. exf5 $4 Rxh3+ 38. gxh3 Rh2#) 37... Rxf5 38. Rd8 Qc7 39. Re8 $1 Qc6 40. Nd7+ Kh7 41. Nf8+ {с вечным шахом.}) 30. Qa6 Ra8 ({не годится} 30... axb4 $4 31. Nd7) ({или} 30... Rxb4 $4 31. Nd3) 31. Qc4 axb4 32. Qxb4 {. У черных хорошие шансы отстоять ничью, несмотря на отсутствие пешки, поскольку борьба ведется на одном фланге.}) 24. Qd5 Qb5 25. Bxe5 {Диаграмма} Be7 ({Безнадежно} 25... Qxb4 $2 26. Bd6 Re8 27. c6 {.}) 26. Qd2 $6 ({Жестче} 26. Na5 $1 b6 27. Nb7 {.}) 26... Rfd8 27. Bd6 Bf6 28. e4 h6 29. Nd4 Bxd4+ 30. Qxd4 Re8 31. Rfe1 Kh7 32. g4 $1 {Со зажимает оппонента.} f6 33. f4 { Диаграмма} Qc6 $6 ({Не стоит злоупотреблять компьютерными вариантами, но здесь это уместно. Компьютер подчас держит даже столь беспросветные позиции, как сейчас у черных. Вот как это ему удается:} 33... Bf7 34. f5 a5 $1 35. bxa5 Ra8 36. Rb1 Qxa5 37. Kf2 Qa2+ 38. Rb2 Qa6 39. Rb6 Qa2+ 40. Re2 Qa7 41. h4 ({или} 41. Reb2 Qa1 $1) 41... Qa3 $1 42. c6 ({на} 42. Rxb7 { также выручает} Qc1) 42... Qc1 $1 43. cxb7 Ra1 44. Kg3 Qh1 45. Bc5 h5 $1 46. g5 fxg5 47. hxg5 h4+ 48. Kf4 Rf1+ 49. Ke3 Bh5 {Диаграмма} 50. Rh6+ $1 gxh6 51. Qd7+ Kg8 52. Qxe8+ Bxe8 53. b8=Q Qg1+ {. Черные объявляют вечный шах. Красочная игра!}) 34. f5 Bf7 35. h4 Ra8 36. Rc2 a5 37. g5 Bh5 {Диаграмма} 38. g6+ $6 {Со последовательно осуществляет зажим, но в данный момент следовало отклониться от намеченного курса и перейти к решительным действиям.} ({Прямолинейное} 38. gxf6 $1 {проще всего решало исход борьбы. Например:} Rg8 39. b5 $1 Qxb5 40. Rb2 Qd7 41. Kh2 a4 42. Qd5 Ra7 43. Rg2 {.}) 38... Kh8 39. b5 $6 ({ А здесь к цели ведет} 39. e5 $1 {, хотя еще требуется точность.}) 39... Qxb5 40. Rb2 {Диаграмма} Qc6 $6 {Финальная оплошность.} ({Максимально затрудняло задачу белых} 40... Qd7 $1 41. Qd5 Qc6 $1 { , и все же они могут победить:} 42. Qd3 $1 Bg4 $5 ({ после} 42... Ra6 {белые проводят эффектный штурм королевской крепости:} 43. e5 $1 fxe5 44. Rxe5 Rxe5 45. Bxe5 Ra8 46. Qe3 $1 Kg8 47. Qb3+ Kh8 48. Bxg7+ $1 Kxg7 49. Qf7+ Kh8 50. Qh7#) 43. Rb6 Qd7 ({не помогает и} 43... Qa4 44. e5 Qf4 ({или } 44... Rad8 45. e6) 45. Rf1) 44. Rf1 $1 ({упускает выигрыш} 44. Qd5 $2 Bxf5 45. Rxb7 Qe6) 44... a4 45. Qd5 Ra7 46. Qf7 $1 {(решающее вторжение)} Rd8 47. Qxd7 Rxd7 48. c6 $1 Rxd6 49. c7 {.}) 41. Rb6 Qc8 42. Qd5 a4 43. Rxb7 Rg8 44. c6 {Угроза c6-c7 с последующим Rb8 неотразима.} 1-0 [Event "Altibox Norway Chess"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2018.06.05"] [Round "7.3"] [White "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C83"] [WhiteElo "2789"] [BlackElo "2760"] [Annotator "Hess, R"] [PlyCount "80"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [WhiteTeam "France"] [BlackTeam "India"] [WhiteTeamCountry "FRA"] [BlackTeamCountry "IND"] {In recent years, Viswanathan Anand has been counted out many times. His rating has dropped to 2760 and out of the world top 10, yet he won a World Rapid title. Even as he approaches 50 years old, no player can underestimate him, lest they fall victim to a game like this. Against MVL in Norway, Anand's play was practically perfect.} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5 8. dxe5 Be6 9. c3 Be7 (9... Bc5 {was played by Anand over 20 (!) years ago in games against Kamsky and Polgar. A quick filter of top games in this line indicate it's an outdated option. Anand did defeat Sethuraman from the White side of this line at the 2017 Isle of Man tournament. }) 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. Re1 Nc5 12. Nd4 Nxd4 13. cxd4 Nd3 (13... Nxb3 {is a bad decision, since the bishop on b3 stares into a wall. White quickly prevents Black from playing ...c5, leaving him with a permanent weakness in the form of a backward pawn.} 14. Nxb3) 14. Re3 Nf4 {The knight's tour continues. Anand is not ceding control of the c-file that easily!} ({MVL had mainly looked at the following game, where Black seemed to have several opportunities to improve with ...c5 breaks:} 14... Nxc1 15. Rxc1 a5 16. f4 g6 17. a4 Rb8 18. Bc2 Qc8 19. Nb3 bxa4 20. Nxa5 c5 {Short,N (2656)-Tukhaev,A (2551) Kolkata 2018}) 15. Nf3 Bg4 16. h3 Bh5 17. Rc3 $146 (17. Bc2 Ne6 18. Bf5 c5 19. dxc5 Bxc5 20. Rd3 Qb6 21. Be3 Bxe3 22. Rxe3 d4 23. Re1 Rad8 {Ye,J (2545)-Norri,J (2400) Helsinki 1992 }) 17... Ne6 18. g4 (18. Be3 f5 {may look similar to a possibility in the game, but after} 19. exf6 Bxf6 20. g4 {Black has additional space for the bishop on the retreating diagonal.} Be8) 18... Bg6 19. Be3 {MVL's last few moves aim to prevent ...c5.} a5 (19... f5 20. exf6 Bxf6 21. Rac1 {remains a fight, but perhaps Black would prefer to have control of the c6 square with the bishop on e8.}) 20. Bc2 ({MVL didn't like} 20. Rac1 c5 21. dxc5 b4 22. R3c2 Bxc2 23. Rxc2 d4 24. Bxd4 a4 25. Bxe6 fxe6) 20... Bb4 21. Rb3 f5 22. exf6 (22. a3 Be7 23. Rxb5 fxg4 24. Bxg6 gxf3 {is extremely suspicious for White, whose king is exposed beyond repair.}) (22. Qb1 {is one of those weird moves hoping to pile up on the diagonal, but Black has tactical resources because of White's overextended kingside.} f4 (22... c5 23. gxf5 Bh5 {is extremely messy.}) 23. Bxg6 hxg6 24. Qxg6 (24. Bc1 c5) 24... Ra6 $1) 22... Bxc2 23. Qxc2 Qxf6 24. Ne5 c5 $1 {Anand has great foresight here; he could have kept material level and played for an attack on the kingside, but he holds nothing back.} (24... Rad8 25. Nc6 (25. Qf5 {leads to an ending where White has decent drawing chances, but it'd be a tough road ahead.}) 25... Rd6 26. Nxb4 axb4 {is bad for White. The knight on e6 absolutely dominates the big pawn on e3, and White's shaky kingside does him no favors.} 27. Rxb4) 25. Nd7 (25. a3 a4 26. Rxb4 (26. Rd3 cxd4 27. Nd7 Qg6 $1 28. Nxf8 Rxf8 {when the pin on the rook is devastating.} 29. axb4 dxe3 30. fxe3 Ng5) 26... cxb4 27. Nd7 Qf3 28. Nxf8 Rxf8 29. Qc6 Nf4 ( 29... Ng5 30. Bxg5 Qxf2+ {is no less than an immediate repetition, though Black can certainly play on with} 31. Kh1 Qxb2) 30. Bxf4 Rxf4 {is better for Black, though White can try to survive the endgame after} 31. Qe8+ Rf8 32. Qe6+ Kh8 33. Qe3 {where Black is much preferred in a number of continuations.}) 25... Qf7 (25... Qh4 26. Nxf8 Rxf8 27. dxc5 Qxh3 $6 (27... Rf3 28. Qd1 Rg3+ 29. fxg3 Qxg3+ {leads to a forced draw:} 30. Kf1 Qxh3+ 31. Kf2 (31. Ke2 $4 Qg2+ 32. Kd3 Nxc5+ 33. Bxc5 Qe4#) 31... Qh2+ 32. Kf3 Qh3+) 28. Qd1 {Anand}) 26. Nxf8 Rxf8 27. Qf5 $6 (27. a3 c4 (27... a4 28. Rxb4 cxb4) 28. axb4 cxb3 29. Qxb3 { "In hindsight this is what I should have done: look for equality." (MVL). He certainly has a point, but it's always an uphill battle.} (29. Qc6 a4 30. Qxd5 Nf4 {The outside passed pawn and permanent threat of a4-a3 is trouble for White.}) 29... Qf3 {keeps Anand in charge, despite the temporary pawn deficit.} ) 27... cxd4 28. Qxf7+ Rxf7 29. Rxb4 ({Both players missed} 29. a3 $1 Nc5 30. Rxb4 axb4 31. Bxd4 Nb3 32. Rd1 {with equality.}) (29. Bc1 Nc5 30. Rg3 Ne4) 29... axb4 30. Bd2 {"Somehow I thought this was fine for me but I forgot about b3 completely." (MVL)} b3 {After this, Anand's path to victory was pretty straightforward.} 31. axb3 Rf3 32. b4 (32. Ra3 Rxh3 33. b4 Rxa3 34. bxa3 { is a winning ending for Black, thanks to ideas with ...d3 as well as the outside h-pawn.}) 32... Rd3 33. Re1 Kf7 34. Bc1 Rxh3 35. Re5 Rd3 36. Kf1 Rd1+ 37. Re1 Rxe1+ 38. Kxe1 g6 39. f4 Nd8 40. g5 Ke6 0-1 [Event "Stavanger"] [Site "Stavanger"] [Date "2018.06.07"] [Round "9.2"] [White "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Black "So, Wesley"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C65"] [WhiteElo "2822"] [BlackElo "2778"] [Annotator "Hess, R"] [PlyCount "95"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] [WhiteTeam "United States"] [BlackTeam "United States"] [WhiteTeamCountry "USA"] [BlackTeamCountry "USA"] [WhiteClock "1:37:15"] [BlackClock "1:23:37"] {Heading into the final round of the Altibox Norway Chess tournament, Fabiano Caruana was tied for first with Magnus Carlsen, Hikaru Nakamura, and Wesley So. As the only player with the White pieces, Caruana had to be the favorite. Nakamura had Black against Aronian, who dominates their head-to-head matchup. Carlsen's game against Maxime Vachier-Lagrave was over almost as soon as it began. That left Caruana with the opportunity to press for a win against So, whom he defeated in the first round of the Candidates.} 1. e4 {By no means a surprise, but Caruana used the Catalan to dispatch So in Berlin.} e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. O-O Nd4 6. Nxd4 Bxd4 7. Ba4 (7. Nd2 a6 8. Ba4 b5 9. Bb3 d6 10. Nf3 Bb6 11. a4 Rb8 12. axb5 axb5 13. c3 O-O {Vachier Lagrave,M (2789) -Nakamura,H (2769) Stavanger 2018}) 7... c6 8. c3 Bb6 9. Na3 d6 10. Bc2 Be6 $146 (10... O-O 11. Nc4 Bc7 12. Bg5 d5 13. Ne3 dxe4 14. dxe4 h6 15. Bh4 Qxd1 16. Rfxd1 Be6 {Van Foreest,J (2609)-Leko,P (2679) Germany 2018}) (10... Bg4 { would be a useful move if it forced the queen to a bad square, but here it pushes the queen to e1, where after an eventual f-pawn move (following Kh1) she will move to g3 or h4.}) 11. Qe2 h6 12. Kh1 g5 {In addition to overlooking an immediate path to equality, So creates lasting weaknesses in his position.} ({Carlsen and MVL thought} 12... Ng4 {was very obvious and Black is at least fine. An important point is that} 13. f3 {is met by the decisive} (13. h3 Qh4) (13. g3 h5) 13... Nxh2 $1) 13. Nc4 Bc7 14. Ne3 d5 15. Re1 {"I just didn't see a move." (Caruana)} (15. a4 {Agdestein. This would give Caruana a head start on his queenside initiative. One major drawback is that the knight does not have the f1 square to retreat to, meaning} d4 {would force the knight to a square where it can be captured. Certainly not the end of the world, but limiting.}) 15... Qe7 16. a4 O-O-O 17. Rb1 d4 18. Nf1 Bb6 $6 {"A strange move. " (Caruana)} (18... Rdg8 {or}) (18... Rhg8 {and pushing the pawns made more sense, Caruana felt. Black is better.} 19. cxd4 exd4 20. b4 {"isn't real counterplay because b5 is met by c5." (Caruana)}) 19. Bd2 Bg4 (19... dxc3 20. bxc3 Ng4 21. Ne3 {Caruana} (21. h3 $5 h5 {keeps the initiative coming. The point is that capturing the knight leads to an open h-file and a blossoming attack.} (21... Nxf2+ 22. Kh2 {and Black must sacrifice some material for the attack [with Rxb6 being the threat, removing the guard of the knight on f2].})) ) 20. f3 Be6 21. Ng3 (21. c4 {is a plausible move, permanently eliminating the chance of opening the center. However, it becomes unclear how White unleashes an attack on the queenside, whereas Black is ready to start pressing on the kingside.}) 21... Rhg8 (21... Rdg8 22. a5 Bxa5 23. cxd4 Bxd2 24. Qxd2 exd4 25. Qa5 a6 26. Qe5 Qd8 27. Ne2 {Caruana}) ({Agdestein suggested} 21... h5 22. Bxg5 h4 23. Nf5 (23. Nf1 Rdg8) 23... Bxf5 24. exf5 dxc3 {with the idea} 25. bxc3 $2 (25. Qxe5 Qxe5 26. Rxe5 Nh5 27. Bxh4 {is good for White}) 25... Nh5 $1 { and Black wins.}) 22. b4 g4 $6 {Caruana thought this was a bad move.} ({ Caruana thought that} 22... h5 {was more correct.} 23. a5 Bc7 24. cxd4 exd4 25. b5 h4 26. Nf1 g4 (26... Nh5 27. bxc6 bxc6 28. Ba4) 27. f4 (27. bxc6 bxc6 28. Ba4 {allows Black to open the kingside. For example, the following is too crazy to calculate:} gxf3 29. Qxf3 Ng4 30. Bxc6 Ne5 31. Bb7+ Kd7)) 23. a5 dxc3 24. Bxc3 Bd4 25. Bxd4 Rxd4 26. b5 c5 27. Bb3 {A very important idea! Caruana intended to secure control of the c4 square, since Black can't afford to swap bishops with the f5 square a permanent outpost for the White knight.} h5 (27... gxf3 28. gxf3 {when the open g-file is blockaded and difficult to make use of for So.} (28. Qxf3 Ng4 {is looking worrisome for White.})) 28. Nf5 Bxf5 29. exf5 Re8 30. Rbc1 {Caruana had 5 minutes left on the clock here vs 20 minutes for So - without increment.} ({Caruana "kind of regretted" not including} 30. b6 a6 31. Rbc1 {with nagging pressure on c5, which can't be defended by a pawn. }) 30... gxf3 (30... b6 31. axb6 axb6 32. Qa2 {is trouble for Black, who has problems on the a-file and on the f7 square.}) ({Caruana said he would have played} 30... Kb8 31. b6 a6 ({can Black afford to allow White to capture on a7? It doesn't appear to be the end of the world. Meanwhile, Black is trying not to waste any tempi while gaining the momentum. A very double-edged position.} 31... gxf3)) 31. Qxf3 Red8 32. Bc4 ({Huge complications arise after } 32. a6 Rxd3 33. axb7+ (33. Qxb7+ Qxb7 34. axb7+ Kxb7 35. Bxf7 Kb6 {and Black's king is active - Caruana}) 33... Kb8 (33... Qxb7 34. Rxc5+ Kb8 35. Qxb7+ Kxb7 36. Bxf7) 34. Qc6 Ne4) 32... e4 33. dxe4 (33. a6 Ng4 {is pandemonium.}) 33... Qe5 (33... Rxe4 34. Be6+ $1 fxe6 35. Rxe4 Nxe4 36. Qxe4 { is good for White, since he has an attack and should go up a pawn.}) 34. Bxf7 Rd3 35. Qf2 R8d4 36. Bd5 Kd7 37. b6 $6 {"I was a bit confused and I panicked." (Caruana)} ({He saw} 37. h3 {but didn't like} Rd2 38. Qg1 (38. Qe3 R4d3)) ({ Caruana said he "didn't want to leave the back rank" but} 37. Rxc5 {was entirely possible:} Kd6 (37... Ng4 38. Qh4 Rh3 39. Be6+) 38. Rcc1 Ng4 39. Qh4) ({"If I wanna wait, why not just} 37. Bxb7 {" (Caruana)}) 37... axb6 38. axb6 Ng4 39. Qg1 (39. Qh4 Rh3 $3 40. Be6+ Ke8 41. Qxh3 Nf2+ 42. Kg1 Nxh3+ 43. gxh3 Rd2 {Caruana. Clearly he overlooked the Rh3 tricks!}) 39... Kd8 $6 ({The best chance was} 39... Rd2 40. Rf1 h4 41. Rxc5 (41. h3 R4d3 42. hxg4 h3) 41... Kd6 { "And now I can play} 42. f6 {and it just becomes a total mess." (Caruana)}) 40. h3 $4 (40. Bxb7 Rd2 41. Rf1 {still is great for Caruana.}) 40... Rxh3+ 41. gxh3 Rd3 $4 {Despite having reached move 40, So only used four seconds on this move. Caruana had also only considered this move when he played his 40th move.} ({ So could have forced a draw and a tiebreak on Friday with five players with} 41... Rd2 $1 42. hxg4 hxg4 43. Qg2 Qh8+ 44. Kg1 Rxg2+ 45. Kxg2 Qh3+ 46. Kf2 Qf3+ 47. Kg1 Qg3+ {with a draw.}) 42. Qg2 $1 {The only move, but the winning move.} Rg3 43. hxg4 Rxg2 44. Kxg2 h4 45. Kf3 Qg3+ 46. Ke2 h3 47. Rg1 Qh4 48. e5 1-0 [Event "FIDE Candidates"] [Site "Berlin"] [Date "2018.03.27"] [Round "14"] [White "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C43"] [WhiteElo "2767"] [BlackElo "2784"] [Annotator "Caruana,F"] [PlyCount "138"] [EventDate "2018.03.10"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventRounds "14"] [EventCountry "GER"] [EventCategory "22"] [SourceTitle "CBM 184"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2018.05.16"] [SourceVersion "1"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.05.16"] [SourceQuality "1"] {This was the climax of three weeks of chess, months of preparation and thirteen hard fought previous games. My tournament had its ups and downs, but thanks to a fortunate win the previous day, I entered the final round half a point ahead of my closest rivals, Mamedyarov and Karjakin. My tiebreaks were worse than both of theirs, so I wasn't sure a draw would be enough to win the event, but at the same time I didn't want to burn my bridges playing for a win. I also felt that Alexander would be eager for a fight.} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. d4 {Although this move isn't a usual part of Grischuk's opening repertoire, I wasn't entirely surprised. I realized that this variation, which leads to an unclear, playable and fluid game, might suit his style, so I was at least mentally prepared for this possibility.} Nxe4 4. dxe5 d5 5. Nbd2 Nxd2 ({ Interestingly, I was faced with this variation just two weeks later against Vitiugov. In that game I chose to play a new move:} 5... Qd7 $5 {, and in the end I won that game.}) 6. Bxd2 Be7 7. Bd3 {I was already not so familiar with this position, but my moves seemed easy to play, so I continued to play naturally.} ({All I could recall was seeing a game by Nepomniatchti recently, where he played a slightly more passive continuation:} 7. Be2) 7... c5 8. c3 Nc6 9. O-O Bg4 {This was already a big choice. It is very attractive to pin the knight, but I had to make sure I wouldn't run into a powerful e6 after my bishop retreats to h5.} (9... Be6 {was perhaps more circumspect, although then White can consider mixing it up with} 10. b4 $5) 10. Re1 Qd7 (10... O-O { would be less accurate. For example, White could consider posting a bishop on f5, which would be very annoying:} 11. h3 Bh5 12. Bf5 $5) 11. h3 Bh5 12. Bf4 { This came as a surprise, but it's probably an excellent move.} ({Now I'm well prepared for} 12. e6 $2 fxe6) (12. Qc2 Bxf3 13. Bf5 Qc7 14. gxf3 Nxe5 {also doesn't work out well for White.}) (12. b4 $5 {was the move I was mainly concerned with. The variations become very complex, but I felt that my position would be okay after} cxb4 13. cxb4 O-O 14. Qb1 (14. Qc2 $2 Bxf3 15. Bxh7+ Kh8 16. Bf5 Nd4 $1 {is a nice trick.}) (14. g4 Bg6 15. e6 $5 fxe6 16. Bxg6 hxg6 17. b5 Nd8 18. Ne5 Qe8 19. Qc2 {is an unusual and slightly concerning pawn sacrifice. Here I was mainly looking at moves like 19...Bh4, but strongest is} Bd6 $1 20. Nxg6 Rf6 {with an excellent position}) 14... Bxf3 15. Bxh7+ Kh8 16. Bf5 Qc7 17. gxf3 g6 $1 {A very important move.} (17... Nxe5 $2 18. Qd1 $1 {is surprisingly already busted for Black}) 18. Bc2 Nxe5 { , and the position is unclear, but no worse for Black.}) 12... Qe6 $1 {This move looks strange, but I came to it by the process of elimination. I need to prevent e6 once and for all, and although the queen is not a good blockader, there was no alternative.} ({My first instinct was to play} 12... Nd8 $2 { , but then I noticed a strong response:} 13. g4 Bg6 (13... Ne6 14. gxh5 Nxf4 15. e6 $1 Nxe6 16. Ne5 {is likewise very strong}) 14. e6 $1 Nxe6 15. Ne5 { , with a huge attack.}) (12... O-O 13. Qc2 Bg6 (13... Bxf3 14. Bxh7+ Kh8 15. Bf5 $1 Be4 16. Qxe4 {also doesn't work out for Black.}) 14. Bxg6 hxg6 15. Rad1 {felt like strong pressure for White, because d5 is a weakness and the possibility of e6 is always in the air.}) 13. a3 $6 {Far too slow. It was here that Grischuk started to drift with his play.} (13. Qc2 $2 Bxf3 14. Bf5 $2 Be4 {is an important trick, winning a piece.}) (13. Be2 {was the most challenging move. Here I saw two options:} O-O $5 {offers an exchange sacrifice, but White is not obligated to accept it.} (13... Bg6 {is playable, but White can perhaps hope for a slight edge after} 14. Bg3 O-O 15. Nh4 {getting the advantage of the bishop pair.}) 14. Nd4 (14. Qd2 {prepares Nd4, and would lead to a very messy situation after} Rfe8 15. Nd4 cxd4 16. Bxh5 dxc3 17. bxc3 d4) 14... Bxe2 15. Nxe6 Bxd1 16. Nxf8 Ba4 (16... Bc2 17. Nd7 Nd8 18. e6 Nxe6 19. Bd2 Rd8 { also offers decent compensation.}) 17. b3 (17. Nd7 $2 Nd8 {traps the knight}) 17... Bb5 18. a4 Bd3 19. Nd7 Rd8 20. e6 fxe6 21. Ne5 Nxe5 22. Bxe5 Bc2 { This position is likely to end in a draw.}) 13... O-O 14. b4 h6 {Covering g5, which will be useful in many lines in the future. Also making sure h7 no longer ever hangs.} ({I couldn't decide on whether to play h6 or} 14... b6 { , and probably both are fully playable.}) 15. Bg3 {White has many options, but in every case Black is comfortable.} (15. bxc5 Bxc5 16. Be2 Rad8 17. Nd4 Bxd4 18. cxd4 Bxe2 19. Rxe2 Rc8 {is at least equal, but I would even prefer Black's position slightly.}) 15... b6 16. Nd4 $6 {I felt during the game that this was a positional mistake, leading to a comfortable situation for Black.} ({A better move was} 16. Be2 Bg6 17. Nh4 Bxh4 18. Bxh4 d4 {, with a complex and roughly balanced position.}) 16... Bxd1 17. Nxe6 fxe6 18. Raxd1 c4 {It's important to play this before White goes for c4 himself. Now the pawn structure is very favorable for me: all of White's queenside pawns on the dark squares are vulnerable, and his bishop on g3 is extremely passive. The only plus for him is that whenever I open up the position, his light-squared bishop will become powerful.} 19. Bc2 (19. Bg6 b5 20. f4 Bd8 $1 {and next ...Ne7 kicks the bishop from g6.}) (19. Be2 a5 {is likewise unpleasant for White, and} 20. Bg4 Nd8 {is only temporarily inconvenient. Soon I'll play ...g6 and ...h5.} ) 19... b5 {Preparing ...a5 without allowing b5.} 20. a4 (20. f4 $6 a5 { would soon become critical for White, because ...axb4 and ...d4 would completely undermine his queenside.}) 20... a6 21. f3 $1 {A strong and necessary defense.} (21. f4 {, preparing f5, is most natural, but after} Rac8 $1 {Black prepares ...d4 and White will fall apart. For example} (21... d4 $2 22. Be4 {is clearly wrong.}) 22. axb5 axb5 23. f5 d4 $1 24. cxd4 Nxb4 {, with a winning position.}) 21... Bg5 $6 {Too academic. I needed to be more daring to keep the advantage.} ({Now} 21... Rac8 22. Bf2 {leads nowhere.}) (21... Nxb4 $1 {was the most testing move:} 22. cxb4 Bxb4 23. Re2 Be7 24. axb5 axb5 25. Rb1 b4 {, and White will have to defend accurately against the three passed pawns. I didn't really consider sacrificing, however, because the game continuation looked so attractive.}) 22. Bf2 $2 {This mistake is very serious, and seems to be the difference between a draw and a loss.} (22. h4 $1 Bf4 23. Bxf4 Rxf4 { I understand why Grischuk didn't want to give away his bishop pair, but White is already close to equal after} 24. Bg6 {For example,} Rc8 (24... Ne7 25. h5) 25. Kf2 d4 26. axb5 axb5 27. cxd4 Nxb4 28. Rb1 Nd5 29. Rxb5 Rxd4 30. Reb1 { , with a likely draw.}) 22... Bf4 23. Bc5 Rfd8 24. Bd6 Bg3 25. Re2 g5 {When I played 21...Bg5 I saw this position, and I was very happy to get it. White is almost completely paralyzed, due to the dominant bishop on g3. However, it is still difficult to make progress.} 26. Kf1 Kf7 27. Bc7 Re8 28. Bd6 Rac8 { A strange move. We were both low on time, so I was a bit unsure of what to do, but placing a rook on c8 is certainly not the way.} ({I should have started by placing my pawn on h4, which is useful in many variations down the road. Most concretely, often White will play Rxd5 and e6, and with the pawn on h4 the bishop will be defended.} 28... h5 $1 29. Ra1 h4 30. Bb1 Red8 {, and sooner or later White will slowly die.}) 29. Ra1 Red8 30. Bb1 {As usual, when time gets low, Grischuk continues to play very well.} Rd7 ({I could still place my pawn on h4 before deciding what to do next:} 30... h5 31. axb5 axb5 32. Ra6 h4 { and here} 33. Rb6 Rd7 34. Rxb5 Ra8 {is not something I should worry about.}) 31. Ra3 (31. axb5 axb5 32. Ra6 {was a better defense. I was planning} Ra7 { , but after} ({Perhaps} 32... h5 $5 {is again the best move.}) 33. Rxa7+ Nxa7 34. Ra2 Nc6 35. Ra6 {White's position becomes a bit easier to hold.}) 31... d4 {I was extremely happy to get this move in at an opportune moment. We were both short on time, but now the play becomes forced:} 32. axb5 axb5 33. cxd4 Nxd4 34. Rea2 Nc6 35. Be4 Bxe5 36. Bxc6 (36. Bc5 Kf6 {is also very bad for White.}) 36... Rxd6 37. Bxb5 {Black has a serious advantage, due to the strength of the passed c-pawn and the weakness of White's king. The weakened dark squares around White's kingside make a direct attack very likely in the future. The next few moves were played in heavy time trouble, which led to some poor decisions.} Rd1+ (37... c3 $1 {was strongest:} 38. Ba4 (38. Rc2 Rb8 39. Ra5 Kf6 {leaves White tied up, and likely to lose the b-pawn.}) 38... Rcd8 39. b5 Rd3 {and White is paralyzed and facing ideas of ...Bd6.}) 38. Ke2 Rg1 39. Ke3 Rb1 $2 ({Direct play was again best:} 39... c3 $1 40. Rc2 Rd8 {with a decisive edge. For example} 41. Ra7+ Kf6 42. Rd7 Rb8 43. Bd3 Rxb4 {with a position similar to the game.}) 40. Ra7+ $2 {The last move of the time control, and it is both an extremely natural and a poor one.} (40. Ra8 $1 Rxa8 41. Rxa8 Rxb4 42. Ba4 {This is difficult to decide on, since White condemns himself to a pawn down position where he will suffer for a very long time. However, trading rooks is absolutely necessary to keep any drawing chances alive.}) 40... Kf6 {And now I could finally get up from the table and check the other games. I was pleased to see Karjakin had already drawn, and Kramnik and Mamedyarov were playing a drawn ending. I felt very safe that a draw would be enough for tournament victory, but of course with a much better position, I continued to play.} 41. Bd7 Bf4+ 42. Ke2 (42. Kf2 Rd8 {is essentially the same as the game.} (42... c3 $2 {looks very beautiful, but misses the win after} 43. Re2 $1 (43. Bxc8 $2 Rb2+ {on the other hand, leads to a pawn promotion.}))) 42... Rd8 43. Rc2 ({At this moment, I think Alexander realized that} 43. R2a6 { runs into an exchange sac:} Rb2+ 44. Kf1 Rxd7 $1 45. Rxd7 c3 46. Rc6 c2 { and the pawn is unstoppable. Black will be a piece ahead.}) 43... Rxb4 (43... Rg1 $1 44. Kf2 Rd1 {is even stronger, and would be immediately winning, but I saw no reason to just take the pawn and win slowly.}) 44. Bc6 c3 {A pawn up, and still with a positional advantage. I knew I was completely winning, and around this point I saw Kramnik and Mamedyarov agree to a draw. A draw would have been enough for me, but I couldn't bring myself to offer it in such an overwhelming position.} 45. Rd7 Rc8 {Of course, no trade of rooks.} 46. Be4 h5 {I might as well place the pawn on h4 before deciding on what to do next. White has no ideas, so it was only a question of time until I broke through.} 47. Kd3 Rb2 48. Ke2 h4 49. Rd1 Ke5 50. Ra1 Rd8 51. Rd1 Rdb8 52. Ra1 Bd2 53. Ra6 Rd8 54. Rc6 Rb1 55. Kf2 Ra1 56. Rc4 Rd4 57. Rc8 Rb4 58. Ke2 Kf4 59. Kf2 Rbb1 60. Rf8+ Ke5 61. Bd3 Rb2 62. Ke2 Re1+ 63. Kf2 Rc1 64. Rxb2 cxb2 65. Rb8 Bc3 66. Be4 Bd4+ 67. Ke2 Kf4 68. Rb4 e5 69. Rb7 Kg3 {And after this, Grischuk resigned and I secured qualification to the 2018 World Championship match!} 0-1 [Event "Gashimov Memorial 5th"] [Site "Shamkir"] [Date "2018.04.23"] [Round "5"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Wojtaszek, Radoslaw"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B23"] [WhiteElo "2843"] [BlackElo "2744"] [Annotator "Nielsen,PH"] [PlyCount "61"] [EventDate "2018.04.19"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "AZE"] [EventCategory "21"] [SourceTitle "CBM 184"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2018.05.16"] [SourceVersion "1"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.05.16"] [SourceQuality "1"] {The tournament in general, but for Magnus especially had a very quiet start with Topalov's win over Navara being the only deceisive game. The pairings gave Magnus 3 Blacks vs. the Azeri players not leaving much scope for creativity, however in round 5 things were about to change:} 1. e4 { Quintiliano,R} c5 {Radek stays loyal to his compratiot inviting his favourite Najdorf variation.} 2. Nc3 d6 {Najdorf players have to use this move order as e.g.} (2... Nc6 {can be met by} 3. Nf3 $1 {intending 4.d4.}) 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4 {A nice and fitting touch, as this move order vs. the Sicilian was favoured by Vugar Gashimov.} Nc6 5. Qd2 $5 {Magnus unleashes a rare and original concept, completely novel at top level. During Wijk Aan Zee 2017 I received an email from Greek IM Ioannis Simeonidis suggesting this setup as an interesting anti-Najdorf concept and offered it to Magnus to test his concept! At first it reminded me of Greek hubris. After all how likely is it that you can come up with a meaningful and new setup at move 5 in one of the most tested openings historically in chess? GM, Khenkin, the commentator at the event formulated it with classic Soviet iron chess logic: "Chess-wisdom suggests only moving each piece once in the opening, especially the queen, however the World Champion seem to have his own rules". First sight however is deceptive: White has an interesting concept in mind, and very similarly to Fischer-Random chess the players now have to adapt to problems completely untested previously in practice.} Nf6 {Logical and common-sense, but Ofitserian took a much more concrete approach when facing Paravyan in the Russian Junior championship 4 days later harassing the white queen with} (5... g6 6. b3 Bh6 $5 {White however did not budge and went} 7. f4 Nf6 8. Bb2 e5 {Quintiliano,R: '?!'} (8... O-O $142 {Quintiliano,R} 9. O-O-O a5 10. Bb5 Qb6 $132) 9. g3 O-O 10. O-O-O { and won a complex fight. This is what fascinates the most with Simeonidis variation, that an oasis of creativity existed in territory believed to have been long mapped out.}) 6. b3 e6 {On the same day in the Budapest Spring Open but 3 hours later due to the time difference, Kotronias faced} (6... g6 { but got an excellent position after} 7. Bb2 Bg7 8. O-O-O O-O 9. f3 Qa5 10. Kb1 Be6 11. Nge2 {As in the actual game it's noteworthy that the surprised player acts with typical Sicilian moves, while in the game played 4 days later, Ofitserian most likely influenced by the computer, tried a setup aimed specifically at the possible defects of White's concept.}) 7. Bb2 a6 {Again typical Sicilian style.} ({Quintiliano,R: 'Knowing how the game goes,'} 7... d5 $5 {intending ...Bb4 was a more concrete approach. Quintiliano,R: 'maybe is a worthy try'} 8. exd5 {Quintiliano,R} exd5 9. O-O-O Be6 10. Nge2 Qa5 {The point is that despite the isolated pawn, Black has open lines and more freedom to develop the pieces} 11. Kb1 Bc5 12. Nf4 O-O-O $13) 8. O-O-O b5 9. f3 {The position reminds one of a Rauzer, however the white bishop being on b2 and the knight on g1 instead of d4! At first this sounds considerably more passive from whites perspective, but the bishop on b2 not only attacks in the long diagonal but also provides additional safety for the white king. While a knight on d4 would just be exchanged now on g1 it can consider various routes of attack.} h5 $6 {Preventing g4 makes perfect sense, but} (9... Be7 10. Kb1 { is the obvious reply, but then after} (10. g4 Nxg4 $1 {is a nice trick as} 11. fxg4 Bg5 {wins the white queen.}) 10... h5 {Black has a slightly improved version of the game.} (10... O-O {Quintiliano,R} 11. g4 Bb7 {with typical and double-edged Sicilian positions, despite there are some differences of normal lines, the Bb2 being the most clear one, Black should have the usual counterplay ideas.})) 10. Nh3 $1 {Till this move, the general concept was mapped out in preparation, but here the World Champion demonstrates his level, adopting to the specifics of the position excellently. The g5-square very rarely being a relevant square for a white knight in the Scheveningen style Sicilian is of no importance. Like in chess 960 what matters is adapting to the new situation, and the combination of Black's last move weakening the g5-square and White's knight being on g1 prompted this unusual approach.} Be7 11. Ng5 h4 $6 {Again logical and typical, however for this specific position just not very relevant.} 12. f4 Bb7 13. Kb1 Rc8 14. Be2 $1 Qc7 15. Rhe1 $1 { While White's two last moves might appear unimpressive, Be2 almost feeling passive, looks are again deceptive. White quietly finishes his development in essence claiming he can improve his position meaningfully before the eventual confrontation, while Black cannot. Black's position is much worse than it looks. Normally ...Nb4 and ...Qa5 would create counterplay, exchange sacrifices on c3 being part of the equation, but with the white bishop being on b2 such action by Black would be completely pointless, and ...Nb4 simply being answered by a white a3. Especially the knight at c6 seems misplaced blocking both the bishop on b7 and the rook on c8. The relevant question would be, why did Black put it there? But who could resist free development harassing the opponent's queen at move 4?} Nh7 16. Nxh7 Rxh7 17. g4 $6 { At the press conference Magnus explained that he saw the indeed crushing 17. Nd5! but thought his position so dominating that sacrifices were not even neccesary.} (17. Nd5 $1 {Still the knight sacrifice was the best way, as after} exd5 18. exd5 {Black's position is close to hopeless as giving back the piece is positional bankruptcy, but} Nb8 {loses instantly to} 19. Bd3 $1 {with} Rh5 20. Rxe7+ $1 {being the principal tactical point.}) 17... hxg3 18. hxg3 Bf6 19. Bd3 Rh8 20. g4 $6 {A strange coincidence. Magnus' only inaccuracy in the game was g4; unfortunately it was possible to play twice! Unlike move 17 here simplicity was in order, figthing for the open file with} (20. Rh1 $1 {would have given an overwhelming edge.}) 20... Nd4 21. Re3 Kf8 22. Ne2 $1 Nxe2 23. Rxe2 {Despite the exchanges of minor pieces, the difference in king safety still gives White the much more pleasant position.} Bc3 $2 (23... Bxb2 24. Kxb2 Qc5 $1 {was Black's best chance to minimise the damage, but in time pressure Radek finally goes astray.} (24... Rh4 $1 {Quintiliano,R} 25. g5 Qc5 {[%cal Yc5d4]} 26. Kb1 (26. Rh2 Rxh2 27. Qxh2 Ke7 28. Kb1 Qe3 $132) 26... d5 $5 27. exd5 Bxd5 28. Rh2 Rxh2 29. Qxh2 g6 $14 {despite White's position still looking easier, Black is fighting well and has real chances to equalise.})) 24. Bxc3 Qxc3 25. Qe3 Rc5 {Allows a tactical blow, but after} (25... Qc5 26. Qg3 { Black is passive without counterplay while f5 and g5 follow for White with an overwhelming edge.}) 26. e5 $1 dxe5 27. fxe5 Rh1 28. Rxh1 Bxh1 29. Rh2 Rxe5 ({ If} 29... Bb7 {then} 30. Rh8+ Ke7 31. Qg5+ {mates.}) 30. Rh8+ $1 Ke7 31. Qa7+ { And with 32.Rxh1 following next, Black being a piece down resigned. Magnus' shift of pace not only lasted to the upcoming free day's soccer tournament scoring all 6 six goals for the winning team, but also for the remainder of the tournament with crucial wins over first the leader Topalov and then with the black pieces against Anish Giri eventually securing overall victory.} 1-0 [Event "FIDE Candidates"] [Site "Berlin"] [Date "2018.03.24"] [Round "12"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Ding, Liren"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D41"] [WhiteElo "2809"] [BlackElo "2769"] [Annotator "Ding Liren"] [PlyCount "86"] [EventDate "2018.03.10"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventRounds "14"] [EventCountry "GER"] [EventCategory "22"] [SourceTitle "CBM 184"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2018.05.16"] [SourceVersion "1"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.05.16"] [SourceQuality "1"] {This game was played at the 12th round of the Candidates tournament. I had just spoiled a winning position against Alexander Grischuk in the previous round and scored my 11th continuous draw. So I didn't have much in the way of expectations this time.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 c5 {I deviated from 4...c6 which was played in the 4th round and went for a line which became popular thanks to the influence of Vladimir Kramnik.} 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Nxc3 7. bxc3 cxd4 8. cxd4 Bb4+ 9. Bd2 Bxd2+ 10. Qxd2 O-O 11. Bc4 Nd7 12. O-O b6 13. Rad1 (13. a4 {is considered as the main line, but hard to get any advantage also.}) 13... Bb7 14. Rfe1 Rc8 15. Bb3 Re8 {The idea behind this quiet rook move is simple, to control the e-file in case of d4-d5.} (15... Nf6 $2 16. d5 exd5 17. exd5 Qd6 18. Nd4) 16. h3 (16. d5 $5 exd5 17. exd5 Nc5 18. d6 Bxf3 19. Rxe8+ (19. gxf3 Qd7) 19... Qxe8 20. gxf3 Qd7 (20... Qc6 $5) 21. Re1 Ne6 22. f4 Rc5 $13) 16... Nf6 {Now ...Nf6 is possible.} 17. Qf4 (17. d5 exd5 18. exd5 Rxe1+ 19. Qxe1 Qd6 (19... Nxd5 $2 20. Qe5 Rc5 21. Ng5) 20. Nd4 g6 (20... Re8) 21. Nb5 Qc5 22. Nxa7 Re8 23. Qd2 Bxd5 24. Bxd5 Nxd5 25. Qxd5 Re1+ 26. Kh2 Rxd1 27. Qxd1 Qc7+ 28. g3 Qxa7 $11) 17... Nh5 {It's important to prevent the idea d4-d5 followed by e4-e5.} (17... h6 $6 18. d5 exd5 19. e5 $1 Nd7 20. Nd4 Nc5 21. Nf5 Rc7 22. Nd6 Rf8 23. Qe3 $36) 18. Qh2 (18. Qe5 Nf6) 18... h6 {Until now I'm still following in the footsteps of Kramnik. Here my opponent came up with a new move over the board.} 19. Ne5 {White is threatening d4-d5 or Nc4 now.} ( 19. d5 exd5 20. exd5 Rxe1+ 21. Nxe1 Qf6 22. Nd3 Ba6 $1 23. Qe5 Bxd3 24. Qxh5 $11 {So,W-Kramnik,V}) 19... Nf6 {The knight can do little at the edge of the board, so after some thought I decide to bring it back.} 20. Qf4 b5 $1 { Depriving his knight of the c4-square and at the same time threatening ...a5... a4.} 21. Re3 (21. Nxf7 Kxf7 22. e5 a5 23. exf6 Qxf6 24. Qd6 Rc6 25. Qd7+ Qe7 26. Qxe7+ Kxe7 $11) 21... Rc7 {To prevent Rg3.} (21... a5 $5 22. Rg3 Kf8 $13) 22. Nd3 (22. Rg3 $2 Nh5) 22... Rc3 {I want to exchange a pair of rooks to release the pressure on the kingside.} (22... a5 23. Nc5 a4 24. Bc2) 23. Nc5 ({ I was a bit worried about} 23. e5 Nd5 24. Bxd5 Bxd5 25. Rg3 {but after} Kf8 $1 {Black stands well.}) 23... Rxe3 24. Qxe3 (24. Nxb7 $2 Rxe4) (24. fxe3 Qe7 $11) 24... Bc6 $11 {Now with the knight on c5, I have to beware of the potential e4-e5 followed by Ne4.} 25. Rc1 Qb6 26. f3 {With the text it's clear that White will no longer play e5.} (26. e5 $5 Nd5 27. Qg3 Ne7 $1 {clears the way for the bishop} 28. Qg4 Kh8 $13) 26... Rd8 {Improving my position slowly.} 27. Kf2 a5 28. g4 (28. Nxe6 $5 {leads to a drawish ending} fxe6 29. Bxe6+ Kf8 30. d5 Qxe3+ 31. Kxe3 Bd7 (31... Bxd5 32. Rd1 $14) 32. Bxd7 Nxd7 33. Rc7 Ke8 34. Kd4 a4 35. Rb7 Rc8 36. Rxb5 Rc2 37. e5 Rd2+ 38. Ke3 Rxa2 39. e6 Rxg2 40. exd7+ Kxd7 $11) 28... a4 29. Bc2 $6 {A step in the wrong direction. e2 is the better square for the bishop.} (29. Bd1 Nd7 30. Nd3 Bb7 (30... Nb8 31. Be2 Be8 32. d5) 31. Be2 Qd6 32. Kg2 $13) 29... Nd7 $1 30. Bd3 (30. Nd3 Bb7 31. Bb1 Rc8 $15) 30... Nxc5 31. Rxc5 b4 {After the exchange of knights, the pawns start pushing. Also my opponent was in time trouble, he had around 15 minutes at that point, while I had 40.} 32. Bc4 {It's understandable that my opponent doesn't want to stay passive, but after the text I have many decisive plans to support the pawns, for example ...Rb8, ...b3 or ...b3 followed by ...a3.} (32. h4 $142 Be8 33. Bb1 b3 34. axb3 axb3 35. Qc3 b2 36. e5 Rb8 37. h5 Kf8 $1 38. Rc7 Ba4 39. Ke2 Ke8 40. Kd2 Bd7 $17) 32... Bd7 (32... Be8 {is also possible:} 33. d5 b3 34. axb3 a3 35. dxe6 a2 36. exf7+ Bxf7 37. Bxf7+ Kh8 $1 38. Qc3 a1=Q 39. Qxa1 Qxc5+ 40. Kg3 Qc7+ $19) 33. g5 (33. h4 {is also hopeless:} Rb8 34. g5 hxg5 35. Qxg5 b3 36. axb3 axb3 37. h5 Qd6 $1) 33... hxg5 34. Qxg5 Be8 $1 (34... Rb8 {is less clear:} 35. Qe7 Be8 36. Qc7 b3 37. Qxb6 Rxb6 38. axb3 axb3 39. Bd3 b2 40. Bb1) 35. Qe7 b3 36. axb3 a3 {That's the point behind my 34th move. Maybe this idea was missed by my opponent.} 37. b4 Ra8 38. d5 {A nice try, unluckily loses to the most straight forward way.} (38. Ra5 Qxd4+ 39. Kg2 Rxa5 40. Qxe8+ Kh7 41. bxa5 Qxc4 42. Qxf7 Qe2+ 43. Kg3 Qe1+ 44. Kg2 Qxa5 $19) (38. Ba2 Qxb4 $19) 38... a2 39. dxe6 a1=Q 40. exf7+ Bxf7 41. Bxf7+ Kh7 {It's important that the c5-rook gets pinned.} 42. Qh4+ Qh6 43. Rh5 Qa7+ {The only winning move, but it's simple enough,so White resigned. Finally I scored a win after the long drawing streak in classical time control (20 games...), I was relieved.} (43... Qd4+ $4 44. Kg2 Qdd2+ 45. Qf2 $11) 0-1 [Event "Tata Steel-A 80th"] [Site "Wijk aan Zee"] [Date "2018.01.15"] [Round "3"] [White "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C42"] [WhiteElo "2767"] [BlackElo "2811"] [Annotator "Szabo,Kr"] [PlyCount "83"] [EventDate "2018.01.13"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventRounds "13"] [EventCountry "NED"] [EventCategory "20"] [SourceTitle "CBM 183"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2018.03.14"] [SourceVersion "1"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.03.14"] [SourceQuality "1"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. d4 d5 6. Bd3 Bd6 7. O-O O-O 8. c4 c6 9. Qc2 Na6 10. a3 Bg4 11. Ne5 Bf5 12. b4 Nc7 $146 {A novelty by Caruana.} ( 12... f6 13. Nf3 Bg6 14. Nc3 (14. c5 $5) 14... Nxc3 15. Bxg6 hxg6 16. Qxc3 $11 {Leko-Ivanchuk, Monte Carlo blind rapid 2006, with a balanced position.}) 13. f3 Bg6 {A nice solution to the pin.} 14. c5 (14. fxe4 $2 {does not work, as there is} Bxe5 15. dxe5 dxe4 $17 {followed by ...Qd4.}) ({In the event of} 14. Nxg6 fxg6 15. fxe4 dxe4 16. Rxf8+ (16. Bxe4 $2 {loses immediately, as} Bxh2+ $1 17. Kxh2 Rxf1 $19 {and Black is winning,}) ({or} 16. Be2 $2 Qh4 17. g3 (17. h3 Qg3 $19 {followed by ...Qh2 mate.}) 17... Bxg3 $1 18. hxg3 Qxg3+ 19. Kh1 Rxf1+ 20. Bxf1 Qe1 $1 21. Kg1 Rf8 $19 {with a decisive attack.}) 16... Bxf8 $132 { with a complicated position.}) 14... Bxe5 15. dxe5 Ng5 ({Still} 15... a5 $5 { was also possible,} 16. Bb2 (16. fxe4 $2 {is bad again} dxe4 $17 {and Black is better.}) 16... Ng5 {is transposing to the text move.}) 16. Bb2 d4 $2 {A mistake, which allows White's subsequent attack on the kingside.} (16... Nge6 17. f4 Bxd3 18. Qxd3 {transposes to 16...Bxd3.}) (16... Bxd3 17. Qxd3 Nge6 18. f4 g6 19. f5 gxf5 20. Rxf5 Qh4 21. Nd2 a5 22. Raf1 {and White's position looks more tempting, however the engine isn't afraid of anything.}) ({Or even} 16... a5 17. f4 Bxd3 18. Qxd3 Ne4 {was also possible and Black is not worse.}) 17. f4 $1 {White immediately starts his kingside play.} Nd5 {The only move, but White is better here too.} 18. fxg5 Ne3 19. Qd2 Bxd3 20. Qxd3 Nxf1 21. Kxf1 Qxg5 22. Nd2 $1 {White continues the development, doesn't think about the material.} Qxe5 {Black gets some pawns, but the two pieces are stronger, than the rook.} 23. Nf3 ({The engine suggest} 23. Nc4 $1 {, but the human move is 23.Nf3 to protect the h2-pawn.} Qxh2 24. Qxd4 f6 25. Nd6 $16 {and finally White has a clear advantage.}) 23... Qh5 24. Qxd4 f6 25. Qc4+ Kh8 26. Bc1 $1 {After 24... f6 the bishop is already useless on the a1-h8 diagonal. He prepares for Bf4-d6. } Rfe8 27. Bf4 a5 28. Bd6 axb4 29. Qxb4 Qd5 (29... Qf7 {was more solid, however } 30. Kf2 Ra7 31. a4 $16 {is also unpleasant for Black.}) 30. Qxb7 h6 (30... Qd3+ $1 {was a better chance to win the a3-pawn,} 31. Kg1 Rxa3 32. Rxa3 Qxa3 33. h3 $1 {A great cool-blooded reply!} ({The greedy} 33. Qxc6 $2 {could have been met by} Qc1+ 34. Kf2 Qc2+ $1 35. Kg3 Qg6+ $11 {with perpetual checks.}) 33... Qe3+ 34. Kh2 Qe4 35. Qd7 Ra8 {and White should be better, but it is still not clear how the knight can attack the c6-pawn.}) 31. Kg1 $1 {Now White keeps the a3-pawn.} Ra4 32. h3 Rc4 33. Qb2 Qd3 34. Ra2 $1 {A nice reaction to protect the 2nd rank.} Qd1+ 35. Kh2 Rc1 36. a4 {Black doesn't have any threat on the first rank.} f5 (36... Qh1+ 37. Kg3 $18 {and the white king is safe.}) 37. Qb7 f4 38. Bxf4 Rxc5 39. Rd2 Qxa4 40. Qf7 Rg8 41. Be5 Qc4 42. Rd6 $1 { A smart finish to the game!} (42. Rd6 $1 Qc1 (42... Qxf7 43. Rxh6#) 43. Rd8 $1 $18 {and mate on g7!}) 1-0 [Event "FIDE Candidates"] [Site "Berlin"] [Date "2018.03.10"] [Round "1"] [White "Aronian, Levon"] [Black "Ding, Liren"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A18"] [WhiteElo "2794"] [BlackElo "2769"] [Annotator "Mekhitarian,K"] [PlyCount "43"] [EventDate "2018.03.10"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventRounds "14"] [EventCountry "GER"] [EventCategory "22"] [SourceTitle "CBM 184"] [Source "ChessBase"] [SourceDate "2018.05.16"] [SourceVersion "1"] [SourceVersionDate "2018.05.16"] [SourceQuality "1"] 1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e6 3. e4 $1 {This is a good move order if your opponent usually plays setups with ...Nf6 and ...e6. We now enter positions that don't have a particular pattern, but are very independent from typical openings} d5 4. e5 (4. cxd5 $5 {is a different approach} exd5 5. e5 Ne4 6. Nf3 Be7 $5 { the pawn sacrifice is interesting} (6... Bf5 7. Be2 Be7 8. O-O O-O 9. Qb3 Nc6 10. Nxd5 Bc5 11. Ne3 $1 $16 {1-0 (41) Matlakov,M (2714)-Santos Latasa,J (2567) Minsk 2017}) 7. Qa4+ (7. Nxe4 dxe4 8. Qa4+ Nc6 9. Qxe4 Be6 $44) 7... Bd7 8. Qb3 Nc5 9. Qc2 Bg4 10. d4 Ne6 11. Be3 Bxf3 12. gxf3 c5 $1 $132 {1-0 (73) Kryvoruchko,Y (2703)-Debashis,D (2518) Dubai 2018}) 4... d4 5. exf6 dxc3 6. bxc3 Qxf6 {A lot has been investigated in this line recently} 7. d4 b6 (7... e5 $5 {is a concrete approach, tried by Aronian himself in 2014 against Grischuk. This move is fine, but Black has to be precise.} 8. Nf3 Nc6 9. Bg5 Qg6 10. d5 Nb8 11. h4 h6 $1 {Karjakin didn't have problems against Anand with this move.} (11... Nd7 $6 12. Bd3 e4 13. h5 Qf5 14. Rh4 $3 {and suddenly the black queen is lost.} exd3 15. Rf4 $18 {1-0 (40) Grischuk,A (2792)-Aronian,L (2815) Stavanger 2014}) 12. h5 Qa6 $1 $146 13. Be3 Nd7 14. Bd3 Ba3 15. O-O Qd6 16. Nh4 O-O {Black wants to achieve a strategically better position with ...Nf6 and ... Bc5} 17. Nf5 Qf6 18. Ng3 Qh4 {and a repetition of moves was agreed:} 19. Nf5 Qf6 20. Ng3 Qh4 {½-½ (20) Anand,V (2782)-Karjakin,S (2760) London 2017}) 8. h4 $5 $146 {As expected, Aronian starts to show aggression right from the first round in the Candidates tournament. He will play Bg5 like in the line with 8.Nf3, but in some cases here he may play Rh3 and the knight may go to e2 as well.} (8. Nf3 Bb7 9. Be2 Bd6 10. Qc2 $6 {makes Black's life easy.} Qg6 $1 11. Qxg6 hxg6 12. h3 Nd7 $11 {½-½ (45) Mager,D (2283)-Gustafsson,J (2640) Germany 2018, with a comfortable endgame.}) 8... Bb7 9. Bg5 Qf5 10. Bd3 Qa5 11. Kf1 $1 {A smart way to defend the g2-pawn and to run away from ...Qxc3+. The position becomes very original after the last few moves, and it is not easy to find a clear and safe plan for Black, he has so many development possibilities, that it is hard to choose. I would say White's opening experiment is going well so far.} Nc6 (11... Bd6 $5 {preparing ...Nd7 and ...0-0 was possible.}) 12. Rb1 (12. Rh3 $5 f6 13. Bd2 O-O-O 14. a4 $1 {similar to the game, the queen feels somewhat weird on a5. A sample line would be:} e5 15. c5 {[%csl Ra5]} bxc5 16. d5 Ba6 (16... Rxd5 $4 17. c4 $18) 17. Rb1 $1 Bxd3+ 18. Rxd3 Qa6 19. Qg4+ Rd7 20. Rb5) 12... f6 13. Bd2 O-O-O (13... Qa3 $5 {avoiding a4 was interesting} 14. Qh5+ g6 15. Bxg6+ hxg6 16. Qxh8 Qxa2 17. Rd1 Qc2 $1 $44 { with decent compensation for Black.}) 14. a4 $1 {Trying to make the black queen look uncomfortable there on a5.} e5 15. c5 (15. Rh3 $5 exd4 16. cxd4 Bb4 {was Aronian's suggestion for Black after the game on the 15.Rh3 line. White has an interesting sequence now:} 17. d5 Bxd2 18. Rb5 $1 Qa6 19. dxc6 Bxc6 20. Qxd2 Qxa4 21. Rb1 Qxc4 22. Ne2 {and the position remains complex} (22. Bxc4 $6 Rxd2 {is just fine for Black})) 15... Bxc5 16. Rb5 Qa6 17. Rh3 Bxd4 $1 18. Be2 (18. cxd4 $2 Rxd4 19. Ne2 Qxa4 $17 {and Black has four pawns for the piece, and can play this position for a win.}) 18... Rd6 $6 (18... Ba8 $1 {giving b7 for the queen - a very original move} 19. Nf3 (19. Rb2 Qb7 20. cxd4 Nxd4 $132) (19. cxd4 Nxd4 20. Rb2 Nxe2 $132) 19... Qb7 20. cxd4 Nxd4 21. Rb2 {In any case, I feel that Black's position is great after he takes on e2 and plays with the opposite-coloured bishops.} Nxe2 $132) 19. Rb1 (19. Rb2 $1 {is the computer suggestion, with advantage for White. During the press conference, Aronian said he wasn't sure how to evaluate the position after Black's 21st move:} Qa5 20. cxd4 Qd5 21. dxe5 Nxe5 22. Nf3 $16 {Black has many interesting moves here, like ...Re8 or ...Nd3.}) 19... Qa5 20. Rb5 Qa6 (20... Bxc3 {runs into a pretty move (that both players mentioned in the press conference)} 21. Rd3 $1 Rxd3 22. Bxd3 Ba6 23. Bxc3 Qxc3 24. Ne2 Qa3 25. Rb3 Qxa4 26. Bf5+ Kb8 27. Rxb6+ cxb6 28. Qxa4 Bxe2+ 29. Kg1 $16) 21. Rb1 Qa5 22. Rb5 1/2-1/2 [Event "46th GM 2018"] [Site "Dortmund GER"] [Date "2018.07.14"] [Round "1.4"] [White "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C42"] [WhiteElo "2757"] [BlackElo "2782"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "120"] [EventDate "2018.07.14"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. d4 d5 6. Bd3 Bf5 {A Chinese specialty. This line has been played by aces like Wei Yi, Li Chao and Ni Hua. The reigning women's world champion Ju Wenjun has also used the line.} 7. O-O Be7 8. Re1 O-O 9. Nc3 {Not the main line, but Nepomniachtchi had already played it before.} ({The main continuation is} 9. c4 {and after} Nc6 10. cxd5 Qxd5 11. Nc3 {here a couple of examples of the modern practice:} Nxc3 12. bxc3 Rae8 13. Bf4 Bxd3 ({or} 13... Bd8 14. c4 Qd7 15. Bxf5 Qxf5 16. Qd2 Na5 17. Rec1 $5 {as in Anand,V (2776)-Li,C (2728) Sochi 2017}) 14. Qxd3 Bd6 {with slight advantage for White in Anand,V (2767)-Wei,Y (2743) Wijk aan Zee 2018}) ({ The second main option is} 9. Nbd2 {which avoids the doubling of the pawns. However, this move allows the retreat} Nd6 {when Black is happy to trade his less active bishop for the strong counterpart on d3. After} 10. Nf1 Bxd3 11. Qxd3 c6 {the position is approximately equal, Salem,A (2642)-Yu,Y (2760) chess. com INT 2018}) 9... Nxc3 10. bxc3 Bxd3 11. Qxd3 Nc6 ({The aforementioned game of Nepomniachtchi saw} 11... Nd7 12. Rb1 ({but White can try} 12. c4 $5) ({or} 12. a4 $5) 12... Nb6 13. Qf5 Re8 14. Bg5 f6 15. Bf4 Bd6 16. Rxe8+ Qxe8 17. Bxd6 cxd6 18. Qf4 {1/2-1/2 (18) Nepomniachtchi,I (2751)-Jobava,B (2687) Tbilisi 2017 }) 12. Re2 a6 13. Bf4 (13. c4 dxc4 14. Qxc4 Qd6) 13... Qd7 ({It looks logical to proceed with} 13... b5 {to block the doubled pawn comletely after Nc6-a5-c4, but Black is not prepared for this and} 14. a4 Rb8 15. axb5 axb5 16. Ra6 { will give White the initiative.}) 14. Rae1 Rfe8 15. h4 $146 {A novelty. White wants to use the control of the open file to create kingside threats.} ({ This improves on} 15. g3 h6 16. h4 Bd6 17. Bxd6 Rxe2 18. Rxe2 Qxd6 {with equality, Malinovsky,K (2396)-Brecka,I (2323) Czechia 2013}) 15... h6 {This stops Nf3-g5 for good.} ({The obvious} 15... Bd6 {to swap off the rooks would be met with} 16. Ng5 g6 17. Bxd6 Rxe2 ({Or} 17... cxd6 18. h5) 18. Qxe2 Qxd6 19. h5 {with initiative on the kingside.}) 16. Qe3 {As a result, White took control of the open e-file. The question is if he will manage to convert it into something tangible.} b5 ({The rooks are definitely better than the queen after} 16... Ba3 17. Qxe8+ Rxe8 18. Rxe8+ Kh7) 17. h5 {Intending Nf3-h2, followed by Qe3-g3 with a double attack against both the h6 and c7 pawns.} Rac8 $1 {Giri anticipates White's plans.} 18. Nh2 b4 ({White still has all the play after} 18... Bf8 19. Qxe8 Rxe8 20. Rxe8 Nd8 21. Bg3 $1 ({This is even better than the immediate gain of a pawn after} 21. R1e7 Qxe7 22. Rxe7 Bxe7 23. Bxc7 Ne6)) 19. Qg3 {First round, very solid opponent, risk-free position... Nepomnichtchi plays safe.} ({More enterprising would have been} 19. Bxh6 $5 gxh6 20. Qxh6 Bf8 21. Qg5+ Kh8 22. Ng4 {with full compensation for the piece. Apparently both players believed that} Rxe2 23. Rxe2 f6 $1 24. Nxf6 Qg7 25. Qf5 Ne7 26. Qe5 Ng8 {should be good enough for Black to hold.}) 19... Bd6 20. Ng4 $1 {Setting up a trap.} (20. Rxe8+ {is innocuous after} Rxe8 21. Rxe8+ Qxe8 22. Bxd6 cxd6 23. Qxd6 Qe1+ 24. Nf1 Qxc3) 20... Kh8 {Rejected!} ({Instead} 20... Bxf4 $4 {would have lost to} 21. Nf6+ $1 Kh8 22. Qxf4 gxf6 23. Qxh6+ Kg8 24. Re3 $1 Rxe3 25. Rxe3) 21. Rxe8+ {Perhaps White cashed out his advantage a tad too soon.} ({There was an argument for} 21. Bxd6 {with the main idea} cxd6 ({ Better is} 21... Rxe2 22. Rxe2 cxd6 23. Qf4 {although Black still needs to be careful. For instance} bxc3 $2 {allows once again} ({Stronger would be} 23... Kh7 $1 {although White retains the initiative after} 24. Ne3) 24. Nxh6 $1) 22. Ne3 $1) 21... Rxe8 22. Rxe8+ Qxe8 23. Bxd6 cxd6 24. Qxd6 Qe1+ 25. Kh2 Qe6 $1 { A key defensive idea which Giri obviously planned in advance.} ({This time} 25... Qxc3 $2 {would have put Black in an awkward situation after} 26. Qf8+ Kh7 27. Qxf7 Qxd4 28. f4 {as the black king is too loose.}) 26. Qf8+ (26. Qxe6 fxe6 27. cxb4 Nxb4 {is equal.}) 26... Kh7 27. Ne3 bxc3 28. Qc5 {The end of the forcing line leaves some advantage for White, but reduced the material, which brings Black closer to the draw.} Qf6 29. Qxc3 ({The other way of playing it was} 29. Qxd5 Nxd4 30. Kg1 Ne2+ 31. Kf1 Nf4 32. Qe4+ Kg8 33. g4) 29... Qxf2 30. Qxc6 Qf4+ $1 {Another important intermediate check.} ({Giri is correctly avoiding} 30... Qxe3 31. Qxd5 Qf2 32. Qe4+ f5 (32... Kg8 33. d5) 33. Qe5 { with good winning chances for White.}) 31. g3 {The only way to keep the play going.} ({As} 31. Kh1 Qxe3 32. Qxd5 Qe1+ {is perpetual check.}) 31... Qxe3 32. Qxd5 Qf2+ 33. Kh3 ({Or} 33. Qg2 Qxd4) 33... Qxc2 {Good enough for the point to be split, but some practical problems remain.} ({Even better was} 33... f5 { to limit the white king. There is no way to avoid the draw, for example:} 34. c4 Qf1+ 35. Kh4 Qf2 36. Kh3 Qf1+ 37. Qg2 Qd1 $1) 34. Qxf7 Qc8+ 35. Kg2 Qc2+ 36. Qf2 Qe4+ 37. Kg1 {White retained an extra pawn, but the centralized black queen saves him.} a5 {Intending to push that pawn all the way to a3.} 38. a4 Kg8 39. Qa2+ Kf8 40. Qc4 Qg4 {The time control move made Black's task more difficult.} ({Better was} 40... Qe3+ 41. Kg2 Qe4+ 42. Kf2 Qf5+ 43. Ke3 Qxh5 { when the draw is close.}) 41. Qc5+ Kg8 42. Qd5+ Kh7 43. Kf2 Qd1 44. Qe4+ Kg8 45. Qe6+ ({It is too early for} 45. d5 Qxh5 46. Ke3 Qg5+ 47. Kd4 Qxg3 48. Kc5 Qc7+ {and Black survives.}) 45... Kh7 46. d5 Qxa4 $2 {The tough grinding brings fruits.} ({A couple of more intermediate checks were required to save the game:} 46... Qd2+ $1 47. Kf3 Qd1+ 48. Ke4 Qxa4+ 49. Ke5 Qa1+ 50. Kd6 { The white king is there to help the passer, but Black now has one on his own-} a4 {and it should be a draw.}) 47. d6 Qc2+ 48. Kf3 $2 {Inexplicable! Nepomniachtchi gives away the fruits that he patiently planted.} ({White would have won with} 48. Ke3 $1 Qc3+ ({There is no time to advance the pawn} 48... a4 49. Qg6+ $1 Qxg6 50. hxg6+ Kxg6 51. d7) 49. Ke4 Qe1+ ({Or} 49... Qc6+ 50. Qd5 Qa4+ 51. Ke5 {and White should win.}) ({If} 49... Qc2+ 50. Kd4 $1 {would be good.} ({But not} 50. Kd5 Qb3+ $1 {when the white king is sticking to his queen and can't let it go.}) 50... Qd2+ 51. Kc5) 50. Kd5 Qd2+ 51. Kc6 Qc2+ 52. Kd7 {The white king is save and his pawn is faster. For a move, but one move means the world in chess-} a4 53. Qg6+ Qxg6 54. hxg6+ Kxg6 55. Ke6 a3 56. d7 a2 57. d8=Q a1=Q 58. Qd3+ Kh5 59. Qf3+ Kg6 60. Qf5#) 48... Qd3+ {The white king can no longer help the passer and it all ends peacefully.} 49. Kg2 ({Since} 49. Kf4 Qf1+ (49... Qd2+ {would also do.}) 50. Ke5 Qe2+ 51. Kd5 Qa2+ {forces perpetual.}) 49... Qc2+ 50. Kh3 Qc6 51. Qf5+ Kg8 52. d7 Qd6 53. Kh2 a4 54. Qg4 Kf7 55. Qxa4 Ke7 {Well calculated till the draw endgame.} ({The computer does not want to give up the pawn and suggests instead:} 55... Qd2+ 56. Kh3 Qd5) 56. Qe4+ Kxd7 57. Qg4+ Ke8 58. Qxg7 Qd2+ 59. Kh3 Qd7+ 60. Qg4 ({The pawn endgame after} 60. Qxd7+ Kxd7 61. Kg4 Ke6 62. Kf4 Kf6 63. g4 Ke6 64. Ke4 Kf6 {is a textbook draw.}) 60... Kd8 1/2-1/2 [Event "46th GM 2018"] [Site "Dortmund GER"] [Date "2018.07.15"] [Round "2.4"] [White "Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter"] [Black "Duda, Jan-Krzysztof"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B52"] [WhiteElo "2672"] [BlackElo "2737"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "70"] [EventDate "2018.07.14"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ {According to my Megabase, this is the first time that Nisipeanu uses the Moscow line.} Bd7 {The most solid choice.} ({Perhaps Nisipeanu spent the major part of his preparation on} 3... Nd7 {which is what the Polish GM used in his latest games.}) 4. Bxd7+ Qxd7 5. O-O Nf6 6. Re1 ({ Duda faced previously} 6. Qe2 Nc6 7. c3 e6 8. d4 cxd4 9. cxd4 d5 10. e5 Ne4 11. Be3 Be7 12. Ne1 f6 13. f3 Ng5 14. Nd3 Nf7 15. f4 O-O 16. Nd2 Rac8 {Zawadzka,J (2391)-Duda,J (2539) Lublin 2013}) 6... Nc6 7. c3 e6 8. d4 cxd4 9. cxd4 d5 { Getting into a French type of position but without the potentially bad bishop on c8. White, on his turn,is enjoying extra space.} 10. e5 Ng8 ({The knight can be posted more actively as well:} 10... Ne4 11. Nbd2 Nxd2 12. Bxd2 Be7 13. Rc1 O-O 14. Rc3 Rfc8 15. h4 Bd8 {as in the recent game Nakamura,H (2769) -Grischuk,A (2766) Paris 2018}) 11. a3 Nge7 12. Nc3 h5 {An important move which secures control on some valuable outposts.} (12... Nf5 13. g4 $5) 13. Bg5 Nf5 14. Rc1 {Occupying the open file and thus producing a novelty.} Be7 { Equalizing in full.} 15. Bxe7 Qxe7 16. Qd3 {With the threat Nc3xd5.} ({The other idea was} 16. Ne2 O-O-O 17. b4 Kb8 18. Qd2 Qd7 19. b5 Nce7 {when Black is also OK.}) 16... O-O-O {The king is relatively safe on the queenside. At the same time Black is ready to push his g-pawn asap.} (16... O-O {allows the trick} 17. Nxd5) ({Whereas} 16... g6 17. b4 {is playable but does not offer too many prospects to Black.} O-O 18. Ne2 Rac8 {with approximate equality in Lagerman,R (2354) -Gunnarsson,J (2437) Reykjavik 2008}) 17. Na4 Kb8 18. Nc5 ({ It was not too late for} 18. b4 $1 {with the idea to meet} g5 {with} (18... Rc8 {is equal. and now either} 19. b5 ({or} 19. Nc5 g5 20. b5 Na5 21. Nd2) 19... Na5 {In both cases White chases away one of the black knights from the center and the game will remain balanced.}) 19. b5 Na5 20. b6 a6 21. Rc7 Rd7 22. Rec1 Nc4 23. Nc5 $1 {with advantage for White. For example:} Rxc7 24. bxc7+ Kxc7 ( 24... Qxc7 25. Rb1) 25. Nd2 Nxd2 (25... b5 26. Nxa6+) 26. Qxd2 Kb8 27. Rb1) 18... g5 19. Rc3 {Nisipeanu must have miscalculated somewhere.} ({This was the last moment to go for} 19. b4 g4 20. b5 Na5 ({There is no} 20... gxf3 $2 21. bxc6 b6 (21... bxc6 22. Rb1+ Ka8 23. Rb7) 22. c7+ $1) 21. Nd2 {Black is good, but White has not much to complain of neither.}) 19... g4 {Snatching the most important central pawn.} 20. Nd2 Ncxd4 21. Rec1 Rc8 (21... h4 22. Ndb3 Nxb3 23. Nxb3 Rc8 {was also possible.}) 22. Nf1 Rc6 ({On} 22... h4 23. Ne3) 23. Ng3 Ka8 $1 ({Avoiding any discovered attack tricks like} 23... Rhc8 24. Nxf5 Nxf5 25. Na6+) 24. Nxf5 Nxf5 25. b4 ({More stubborn was} 25. Nb3 Rxc3 26. Qxc3 {at least holding the open c-file in control.}) 25... Rhc8 26. a4 b6 27. Nb3 Rxc3 { Simple play. Duda will either win the open file or trade all the major pieces, which is equally good for him.} 28. Rxc3 Rxc3 29. Qxc3 Kb7 30. a5 ({The most resilient} 30. b5 Qc7 31. Qxc7+ Kxc7 32. Kf1 Kd7 {should also lose slowly for White.}) 30... Qd7 $1 ({Avoiding even the slightest glimpse of hope after} 30... Qc7 31. a6+ Kb8 32. Qxc7+ Kxc7 33. b5 {when the black queenside pawns are vulnerable.}) 31. Nd4 Nxd4 32. Qxd4 {Either the queens will be traded after } Qc7 33. g3 Qc1+ 34. Kg2 Qc4 {or the Black pawns will come into motion in case of} 35. Qb2 d4 0-1 [Event "46. Sparkassen Chess-Meeting 2018"] [Site "Dortmund"] [Date "2018.07.14"] [Round "1.3"] [White "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Black "Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2792"] [BlackElo "2672"] [Annotator "KGBesenthal"] [PlyCount "92"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 Nf6 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bg5 c6 6. e3 Bf5 7. Qf3 Bg6 8. Bxf6 Qxf6 9. Qxf6 gxf6 {Despite a miniscule advantage here with a slightly better structure, Kramnik was still willing to work.} 10. Nf3 Nd7 11. Nh4 Be7 12. Ne2 f5 13. g3 Bxh4 14. gxh4 {but there's not much to work with.} Nf6 15. f3 Ke7 16. Rg1 Nh5 17. Kf2 Rae8 18. b4 f4 {With a pawn sacrifice Black opens his light-squared bishop.} 19. Nxf4 Nxf4 20. exf4 Kf6 {This looks good - Black finds a strong square for his king. The black king is not vulnerable and covers the possible invasion squares of e7 and g7 perfectly. With the king close to the centre, White must also watch out for possibilities for it to advance further if he's not careful.} 21. a4 Bf5 22. Ra2 Re7 23. Re2 Rxe2+ 24. Bxe2 a6 25. Ke3 h6 {Taking the g5 square away from the white rook.} 26. Kd2 Ra8 27. a5 Re8 28. h5 Rc8 29. Ke3 Re8+ 30. Kf2 Rc8 31. Ke1 Re8 32. Kd2 Rc8 33. Bd3 Bxd3 34. Kxd3 Re8 35. h4 Rc8 36. Ke3 Re8+ 37. Kf2 Rc8 38. Re1 Ra8 39. Re5 Rb8 { Black threatens to break with b7-b6. The white rook must return to stand guard and be ready to counterattack the weakened black pawns in that case.} 40. Re3 Ra8 (40... b6 $2 41. Rc3) 41. f5 Rc8 (41... Kxf5 $2 42. Re7) 42. Re1 Rd8 43. Kg3 Rc8 44. Kf2 Rd8 45. Kg3 Rc8 46. Kf2 Rd8 {Unfortunately, nothing works. Every way is blocked.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "46. Sparkassen Chess-Meeting 2018"] [Site "Dortmund"] [Date "2018.07.14"] [Round "1.4"] [White "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2757"] [BlackElo "2782"] [Annotator "KGBesenthal"] [PlyCount "120"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. d4 d5 6. Bd3 Bf5 7. O-O Be7 8. Re1 O-O 9. Nc3 Nxc3 10. bxc3 Bxd3 11. Qxd3 Nc6 {[#]} 12. Re2 (12. c4 dxc4 13. Qxc4 $11 {was obvious but 'Nepo' goes a different way.}) 12... a6 13. Bf4 Qd7 14. Rae1 Rfe8 15. h4 h6 16. Qe3 b5 17. h5 Rac8 18. Nh2 b4 {[#]} 19. Qg3 ({ Here an option was} 19. Bxh6 gxh6 20. Qxh6 {and White gains great compensation for the sacrificed material. Black could fight back (e.g. with Bh4) but White's h-pawn and ideas of Ng4 lead to a strong attack.}) 19... Bd6 20. Ng4 Kh8 21. Rxe8+ Rxe8 22. Rxe8+ Qxe8 23. Bxd6 cxd6 24. Qxd6 Qe1+ 25. Kh2 Qe6 { Nepomniachtchi has an extra pawn and does his utmost ot use it.} 26. Qf8+ Kh7 27. Ne3 bxc3 28. Qc5 Qf6 29. Qxc3 Qxf2 30. Qxc6 Qf4+ 31. g3 Qxe3 32. Qxd5 Qf2+ 33. Kh3 Qxc2 34. Qxf7 Qc8+ 35. Kg2 Qc2+ 36. Qf2 Qe4+ 37. Kg1 a5 38. a4 Kg8 39. Qa2+ Kf8 40. Qc4 Qg4 41. Qc5+ Kg8 42. Qd5+ Kh7 43. Kf2 Qd1 44. Qe4+ Kg8 45. Qe6+ Kh7 46. d5 Qxa4 {After this move, the advantage tilts in White's favour.} 47. d6 Qc2+ 48. Kf3 (48. Ke3 $1 Qc3+ 49. Ke4 Qc6+ 50. Qd5 {The positioning of the queen on d5 seems to be quite important. Black can no longer attack the white king from h1, and must avoid a queen exchange.} Qa4+ 51. Ke5 Qa1+ 52. Kf5 Qf6+ 53. Kg4 $18) 48... Qd3+ 49. Kg2 Qc2+ 50. Kh3 Qc6 {Now white can no longer make progress. Giri has worked out a path to a draw.} 51. Qf5+ Kg8 52. d7 Qd6 53. Kh2 a4 54. Qg4 Kf7 55. Qxa4 Ke7 56. Qe4+ Kxd7 57. Qg4+ Ke8 58. Qxg7 Qd2+ 59. Kh3 Qd7+ 60. Qg4 Kd8 1/2-1/2 [Event "46. Sparkassen Chess-Meeting 2018"] [Site "Dortmund"] [Date "2018.07.14"] [Round "1.1"] [White "Wojtaszek, Radoslaw"] [Black "Meier, Georg"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2733"] [BlackElo "2628"] [Annotator "TA"] [PlyCount "61"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. c4 b6 2. Nc3 Bb7 3. d4 e6 4. e4 Bb4 5. f3 Ne7 6. Bd3 {[%emt 0:00:01] LiveBook: 26 Games. A40: Unusual replies to d4} (6. a3 Bxc3+ 7. bxc3 d6 8. Bd3 Nbc6 9. Nh3 Qd7 10. O-O Na5 11. d5 c5 12. f4 O-O-O 13. Ng5 Ng6 {1-0 (26) Saduakassova,D (2484)-Ramirez Alvarez, A (2572) Saint Louis 2018}) 6... e5 7. Nge2 exd4 $1 8. Nxd4 Nbc6 9. Nde2 Ne5 10. a3 Bxc3+ 11. Nxc3 O-O $146 ({ Predecessor:} 11... Nxd3+ 12. Qxd3 d6 13. b4 a5 14. b5 O-O {1/2-1/2 (50) Wimmer,R (2105)-Hassim,U (2270) ICCF email 2016}) 12. Bg5 f6 13. Bh4 N7g6 14. Bg3 Nxd3+ 15. Qxd3 d6 16. Nd5 Qd7 {The position is equal.} 17. O-O-O Bxd5 18. Qxd5+ Qf7 19. Kc2 Ne7 20. Qxf7+ Kxf7 21. Kc3 a5 22. b3 Rfe8 23. Rd2 h5 24. h4 g6 25. Rhd1 Nc6 26. Rd5 Re6 27. Bf4 Ne7 28. R5d2 Nc6 29. Rd5 Ne7 30. R5d2 Nc6 31. Rd5 {Precision: White = 49%, Black = 83%.} 1/2-1/2 [Event "46th GM 2018"] [Site "Dortmund GER"] [Date "2018.07.17"] [Round "3.1"] [White "Giri, Anish"] [Black "Kovalev, Vladislav"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B29"] [WhiteElo "2782"] [BlackElo "2655"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "146"] [EventDate "2018.07.14"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. e5 Nd5 4. Nc3 e6 ({The other main line is} 4... Nxc3 5. dxc3) 5. Nxd5 exd5 6. d4 Nc6 7. c3 {A simple way of gaining small advantage.} ( {Giri avoids the gambit after} 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. Qxd5 d6 9. exd6 Qb6 10. Qe4+ Be6 11. Qh4 f6 (11... Bf5 $6 12. Bc4 O-O 13. O-O Bxc2 14. Bf4 Qxb2 $2 15. Rac1 $1 Ba3 16. Rfe1 Bg6 17. Rcd1 Bc5 18. Bb3 Bb6 19. Ne5 Nxe5 20. Bxe5 Qa3 21. d7 { and White won in Doggers,P (2189)-Afek,Y (2387) Tilburg 2003}) 12. Bc4 $6 Bxf2+ $1 13. Qxf2 Bxc4 14. b3 Qxf2+ 15. Kxf2 Bf7 16. c4 Kd7 17. Ba3 a5 18. Nd2 Rhe8 { and Black held the draw in the blitz game Anand,V (2759) -Mamedyarov,S (2808) Paris 2018}) 7... cxd4 ({Or} 7... d6 8. Bb5 Be7 (8... c4 $6 {also led to advantage for White after} 9. O-O Be7 10. b3 cxb3 11. exd6 Qxd6 12. axb3 Qc7 13. Re1 Be6 14. Bg5 Bd6 15. c4 {in Polgar,J (2708)-Sikula,V (2550) /Hungary 2008/EXT 2009}) 9. exd6 Bxd6 10. dxc5 Bxc5 11. Qe2+ Be6 12. Be3 Bxe3 13. Qxe3 { with favorable version of the isolated central pawn for White, Salgado Lopez,I (2615)-Kantans, T (2514) Reykjavik 2015}) 8. Nxd4 d6 ({The acceptance of the pawn sacrifice after} 8... Nxe5 9. Bf4 d6 10. Bb5+ Bd7 11. Qb3 Nc6 12. Qxd5 Qf6 13. g3 Rc8 14. O-O-O {led to advantage for White in Korneev,O (2649)-Recuero Guerra,D (2315)/ Dos Hermanas 2006/CBM 111 ext}) 9. Bb5 Bd7 (9... Qc7 10. exd6 Bxd6 11. Qe2+ {is unpleasant for Black.}) 10. exd6 Bxd6 11. O-O O-O 12. Nb3 { A novelty. Technically speaking the game shifted into the French Tarrasch line. White has the standard minimal advantage thanks to the black isolated pawn.} ( 12. f4 {is dubious:} Re8 13. Kh1 Bf8 ({Instead Black would be more than fine after} 13... Nxd4 14. Bxd7 Qxd7 15. Qxd4 Qb5) 14. Nf3 Bg4 15. h3 Bf5 16. Ne5 { and Black was good in Repa, J-Lukic,L Winnipeg 1997}) 12... a6 13. Be2 Qc7 14. h3 (14. g3 Rfe8) 14... Rfe8 15. Re1 Re5 {Not only doubling the rooks on the open file but setting a small trap in the process.} 16. Be3 ({The obvious} 16. Bf4 $2 {would lose material after} Rxe2 $1) ({On} 16. Bf3 {Black would most likely react as in the game with} Rae8) 16... Rae8 17. Bd3 {Patiently stopping Black's initiative.} ({The bishop would be more aggressive on the long diagonal. However} 17. Bf3 {is more susceptible to attacks, for example} Ne7 18. Qd2 Nf5 {and if} 19. Bxd5 $2 Rxe3 $1 20. fxe3 Bh2+ 21. Kf2 (21. Kh1 Ng3+ 22. Kxh2 Nf1+) 21... Qg3+ 22. Kf1 Qh4 {leads to decisive attack for Black.}) 17... g6 18. Qd2 Qd8 19. Nd4 ({If} 19. Bh6 {both} Qe7 ({Or} 19... Qf6 {are good for Black.})) 19... Nxd4 20. Bxd4 Rxe1+ 21. Rxe1 Rxe1+ 22. Qxe1 {With careful play Giri prevented any activity along the open file and traded some pieces. For complete happiness he needs to swap off the queens and the dark-squared bishops.} Qe8 23. Qd2 ({Apparently the Dutch GM did not believe that he will have realistic winning chances after the immediate trade} 23. Qxe8+ Bxe8 {but this line was allowing his to grind as long as he likes without any risk of a loss.}) 23... Be5 24. Be3 ({After} 24. Bxe5 Qxe5 25. Qe2 {Black will certainly reject the second trade and activate the queen instead} Qf4) 24... Qe6 25. f4 {Sooner or later this move will be needed. In the foreseeable future the f2 square can be used by the white queen. In the distant future, by the white king. Once the queens are gone, and there it goes all the way to d4 (or b6!)} Bf6 26. a3 {Moving the pawn away from the possible d5-d4 threat.} ({A concrete line in which this is important arises after} 26. Bc2 d4 27. Bxd4 Bxd4+ 28. Qxd4 Bc6 {The a2 pawn is hanging and} 29. Bb3 Qe1+ 30. Kh2 Qe2 31. Bd5 Qxb2 {leaves White no winning chances.}) 26... h5 $1 { The pawn is heading to h4 from where it will allow chances for perpetual check, or may simply separate all the white pawns.} 27. Bc2 Bc6 28. Bf2 {White continues with preparation.} (28. Qf2 {bumps into} Bh4 $1) 28... Qe7 29. Bd1 { Seemingly heading to f3.} (29. Bb3 {will be met with} Qe4) 29... Qe6 30. Bc2 ({ Giri spotted the tactical refutation of} 30. Bf3 $2 d4 $1 31. Bxc6 dxc3 { and Black is already better.}) 30... Qe7 31. Bb6 Qe6 32. Qf2 Qe8 33. Qd2 ({ Once more White cannot trade the dark-squared bishops without allowing any counterplay:} 33. Bd4 Bxd4 34. Qxd4 (34. cxd4 Qe7 {is equal as well.}) 34... Qe1+ 35. Kh2 Qe2 {Black does not risk with the active queen. is good for Black, especially after} 36. Qd3 $6 Qf2 $1) 33... Qe6 34. Bc5 Qe8 35. Qd1 $2 {A blunder!} ({It was not too late to trade the queens with} 35. Qe3 $1 Qxe3+ 36. Bxe3 {A separate question is how realistic White's winning chances are after} h4 {But for sure he can never lose.}) 35... d4 $1 {Kovalev seizes his chance! Suddenly, tables are turned. It will be White who has the isolated pawns.} 36. Qd2 ({Both captures are bad. If} 36. Bxd4 $2 Bxd4+ 37. cxd4 ({Or} 37. Qxd4 Qe1+ 38. Kh2 Qe2) 37... Qe3+ 38. Kh2 (38. Kh1 $2 Qxh3+ 39. Kg1 Qxg2#) 38... Qxf4+ { with large advanatage for Black.}) ({And on} 36. cxd4 $2 Qe3+ 37. Kh2 {Black has a pleasant choice of swithing to the same line with} Qxf4+ ({And the domination after} 37... Bd5 $1 {when the white bishops are effectively excluded from the kingside.})) 36... dxc3 37. bxc3 Qe6 {The problem is not only in the crippled white queenside structure. His king is weak as well.} 38. Bd4 Bxd4+ 39. cxd4 (39. Qxd4 $2 {loses on the spot due to the usual} Qe1+ 40. Kh2 Qe2) 39... Qa2 40. Qc3 Qd5 41. Qd2 Qa2 42. Qc3 h4 {Time control is over and Black can play for two weaknesses. First is white's king, second-the outside passer that he can create in the coming moves.} 43. Kh1 ({Similar is} 43. Kh2 Qd5 44. Qd2 a5) 43... a5 44. a4 $1 {The best practical chance.} (44. Qb3 {drops a pawn after} Qa1+) ({Passive defense would have lost slowly after} 44. Kh2 Qd5 45. Qd2 b5) 44... Qd5 {Good decision!} ({Pure queen endgame offers lots of drawish opportunities after} 44... Bxa4 45. Bxa4 Qxa4 46. f5 $1 gxf5 47. Qc8+ Kg7 48. Qxf5 Qxd4 49. Qxa5 {as the black king is too weak.}) 45. Qd2 b6 {But this is inaccurate due to a small detail.} ({Correct was} 45... Kg7 $1 46. f5 gxf5 47. Qg5+ Kf8 48. Bxf5 Qxd4 49. Qh6+ Ke7 {with serious winning chances for Black.}) 46. f5 $1 {Giri also grabs his chance.} Kg7 {The only way to fight for the win.} ({This time} 46... gxf5 $6 {doe snot work as well, as the black bishop is no longer defended in the line} 47. Qg5+ Kf8 48. Bxf5 Qxd4 49. Qh6+ Ke7 50. Qxc6 {True, Black is not losing even here neither and can force a draw with} Qa1+ 51. Kh2 Qe5+) 47. fxg6 fxg6 48. Bd1 {The black king is weak now too and White can hope for a perpetual.} Qf5 49. Kg1 Bd5 50. Bc2 Qf6 51. Qe3 g5 52. Bd3 Kh6 53. Bc2 {White is ready to build a battery along the b1-h7 diagonal, but this turns out not to be best.} (53. Be2 $1 {was better with the idea to trade the dominant black bishop. Then} Qf4 (53... Kg7 54. Bf3 Bxf3 55. gxf3 {should end with perpetual sooner or later.}) 54. Qe7 $1 Qxd4+ 55. Kh2 Qf4+ (55... Qf2 56. Qd6+) 56. Kh1 Qe4 57. Qf6+ {does not let the black king out.}) 53... Kg7 54. Bd3 Kh6 55. Bc2 Qf4 $1 {Excellent play. The coming checks are harmless.} 56. Qd3 (56. Qxf4 gxf4 {is hopeless for White, as his opponent will soon create an outside passer.}) 56... Kg7 57. Qg6+ Kf8 58. Qd3 { Sad but true. The queen is needed back home.} (58. Qxb6 $4 {leads to mate after } Qe3+ 59. Kf1 (59. Kh1 Qxh3+ 60. Kg1 Qxg2#) (59. Kh2 Qg3+ 60. Kg1 Qxg2#) 59... Bc4+) 58... Kg7 59. Qg6+ Kf8 60. Qd3 Ke7 61. Bd1 Qe4 62. Qd2 Kd6 63. Bc2 (63. Qxg5 $2 Qxd4+) 63... Qf4 64. Qd3 Kc7 {The king escaped from the danger zone and Kovalev can start mounting pressure on the kingside.} 65. Qh7+ Kb8 66. Qd3 {This loses.} ({Somewhat counterintuitive, the solution was to lose some tempos and force Black into his optimal defensive queenside position with} 66. Qh8+ Ka7 67. Qh7+ Bb7 68. Qd3 {However, without the bishop on d5 White will always have the d4-d5 resource to cut it away from the kingside. Say} g4 69. hxg4 Qxg4 70. d5 $1) 66... g4 67. hxg4 Qxg4 68. Qg6 ({Or} 68. Qd2 h3 69. Bd1 Qxg2+ 70. Qxg2 Bxg2) 68... Qxd4+ {Simple play.} (68... Qxg6 {should be also winning, but Kovalev already wants more. For example-} 69. Bxg6 b5 70. axb5 a4 71. Kh2 a3 72. Bb1 Kb7 73. Kh3 Kb6 74. Kxh4 Kxb5 {marching all the way to b2 looks convincing.}) 69. Kh1 Bb7 {Final preparation before the "coup the grace." } ({Of course not} 69... Qf2 $4 70. Qd6+) 70. Qe8+ Ka7 71. Bf5 Qd1+ 72. Kh2 Qd6+ 73. Kh1 (73. Kg1 Qc5+) 73... Qg3 (73... Qg3 {White resigned due to:} 74. Qe2 h3) 0-1 [Event "Dortmund GER"] [Site "Dortmund GER"] [Date "2018.07.18"] [Round "4.3"] [White "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Black "Duda, Jan-Krzysztof"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2792"] [BlackElo "2737"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2018.07.14"] 1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 Bb4 5. Bg2 d6 6. O-O O-O 7. d3 Bxc3 8. bxc3 e4 9. Nd4 exd3 10. exd3 Nxd4 ({Another of the Dortmund participants got the better position after} 10... Ne5 11. f4 Ng6 12. Rb1 c5 13. Nc2 Rb8 14. f5 { in Nepomniachtchi,I (2718)-Savchenko,B (2580) Sochi 2012}) 11. cxd4 d5 12. Bg5 c6 {This logical move is a novelty.} ({A predecessor saw Black suffering after: } 12... h6 13. Bxf6 Qxf6 14. cxd5 Qxd4 15. Rc1 Bf5 16. Rxc7 b5 17. Qf3 Bxd3 18. Rd1 Qe5 19. d6 Be2 20. Qd5 Qf6 21. Re1 {and the white central passer proved to be very strong, Socko,B (2631)-Grigoriants,S (2589) Khanty-Mansiysk 2012}) 13. cxd5 cxd5 14. Qb3 {Sooner or later White will win the d5 pawn. The question is whether he can make use of the doubled pawns in the future.} b6 15. Rae1 $1 { Kramnik keeps the pressure.} ({The immediate pawn gain} 15. Bxf6 Qxf6 16. Bxd5 {does not yield much to White after} Bh3 17. Bxa8 Bxf1) ({It seems more logical to place the other rook on the open file and leave the queenside rook prepare the advance of the a-pawn. However after} 15. Rfe1 Be6 16. Re5 Rc8 17. f4 Qd7 $1 {White can not advance the f-pawn and Black is good. Say} 18. Bxf6 gxf6 19. Re2 Rc7) 15... h6 {Duda gets rid of the annoying bishop.} ({Here} 15... Be6 {will be met with} 16. Re5 Rc8 17. f4 {and White keeps the bind.}) 16. Bxf6 Qxf6 17. Re5 {Once again skillfully keeping the tension.} (17. Qxd5 { is not as convincing due to} Be6 (17... Rb8 $5 {can be answered with} 18. Qe5 $1 Qxe5 19. dxe5 Rd8 20. Re3) 18. Qxa8 Rxa8 19. Bxa8 Qxd4) ({If} 17. Bxd5 Bh3 18. Bg2 Bxg2 19. Kxg2 Qxd4 {with most likely draw.}) 17... Be6 $1 {Provoking the next move and thus weakening the second rank.} ({The other option was} 17... Bb7 $5 {when I suspect that Kramnik would have proceeded with the grinding with something like} 18. Rfe1 ({Or he might have just grabbed the pawn at last:} 18. Bxd5 Bxd5 19. Qxd5 Rad8 20. Qe4) 18... Rac8 19. Qa3 a5 20. Qe7 Qxe7 21. Rxe7 Ba6 22. Bxd5 Bxd3) 18. f4 Rac8 19. Rfe1 ({After} 19. f5 Bd7 20. Bxd5 Rfd8 21. Rfe1 {Black would be happy to trade the bishops with} Bc6) ({ Again, the transition into a pure major piece endgame brings relief to Black, say} 19. Bxd5 Bxd5 20. Qxd5 Rcd8 21. Qe4 Qd6 22. d5 f6 23. Re7 Qxd5 24. Qxd5+ Rxd5 25. Rxa7 Rxd3 {with a draw.}) 19... Rc7 {The rook is excellent on the open file, covering both the seventh rank and getting redy to counterattack along the second. Kramnik needs to make a decision.} 20. Bxd5 {Finally snatching the pawn.} Bxd5 21. Qxd5 Rc2 {This is what the f2-f4 move was provoked for. But White now tries to make use of the weakened back rank.} 22. Re8 {With the threat to trade the rooks and checkmate on the back rank.} ({ Black is fine after} 22. Qb3 Rfc8 23. Re8+ Kh7) 22... Rc8 $2 {It worked. There was no need to retreat.} ({Better were both g-pawn advances. For example} 22... g6 $1 23. Qd7 ({Or} 23. Rxf8+ Kxf8 24. a4 Rd2 {with counterplay}) 23... Rxa2 { and Black should be OK.}) ({Or even} 22... g5 $1 {and if} 23. f5 Rd2 {in both cases Duda has good chances of splitting the point.} ({White also needs to be accurate and cannot afford too active play:} 23... Rc3 24. Qa8 $2 Qxd4+ 25. Kh1 Rxe8 26. Rxe8+ Kg7)) 23. Qd7 Rd8 ({Perhaps Black should have tried} 23... Rcxe8 24. Rxe8 Rxe8 25. Qxe8+ Kh7 26. Qe5 Qg6 27. Qe4 Kg8 $1 {although White has all the play after} 28. d5) 24. Rxd8 Qxd8 {Duda seeks drawing chances in the rook endgame, but it does not seem enough.} (24... Rxd8 25. Re8+ {would have transposed to the line from above.}) 25. Re7 Qc8 (25... Qa8 $5 26. d5 $1) 26. Qxc8 Rxc8 27. Kf2 $1 {An active king is required in the endgame.} ({One should not let the king to be cut after} 27. Rxa7 Rc2) 27... Kf8 ({White should also win after} 27... a5 28. Ke3 b5 29. Ra7 a4 30. d5 Kf8 ({Or} 30... Rc2 31. Ra8+ Kh7 32. d6 {and the pawn promotes.}) 31. Kd4 Rc2 32. d6) 28. Rxa7 Rc2+ 29. Ke3 Rxh2 30. d5 {A solid extra pawn and active pieces is enough for the 14th world champion to convert his advantage.} g5 31. f5 {Calm and patient.} (31. d6 { should suffice as well} gxf4+ 32. gxf4 Ke8 33. Re7+ Kf8 34. a4) 31... f6 32. d6 Ke8 33. Kd4 h5 34. Kd5 b5 ({If} 34... h4 35. g4 h3 36. Rh7 {and the passed h-pawn is not dangerous enough to worry White.}) 35. Ke6 Re2+ 36. Kxf6 h4 37. Re7+ (37. Re7+ {Black resigned as he is getting mated:} Rxe7 38. dxe7 hxg3 39. Ke6 g2 40. f6 g1=Q 41. f7#) 1-0 [Event "46th GM 2018"] [Site "Dortmund GER"] [Date "2018.07.20"] [Round "5.3"] [White "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Black "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C78"] [WhiteElo "2757"] [BlackElo "2792"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2018.07.14"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 {Quite a rare choice for the former world champion. Ever since his match against Garry Kasparov people are more or less accustomed to his Berlin.} 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Bc5 {Already a fresh position for Nepomniachtchi, who does not have much of experience in the Ruy Lopez. Kramnik had used the Møller only once before, last year in an important game against Vishy Anand in Stavanger.} 6. c3 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. a4 {Forcing a concession.} b4 ({Black can also chose to give up the open file:} 8... Rb8 9. d4 Bb6 10. a5 Ba7 11. Be3 exd4 12. cxd4 Bg4 13. Qc1 {as in Yu,Y (2760)-Shankland,S (2671) Liaocheng 2018}) 9. d4 Ba7 10. Bg5 {A novelty. Nepomniachtchi does not want to test his opponent's preparation.} ({A predecessor saw White grabbing the pawn with:} 10. dxe5 dxe5 11. Qxd8+ Nxd8 12. cxb4 {Zhao,Z (2567)-Paciencia, E (2440) Dresden 2008}) 10... Rb8 {Moving the rook away from the dangerous diagonal.} ( 10... h6 {only helps White. After} 11. Bd5 Bb7 12. Bxf6 Qxf6 13. a5 O-O 14. Qa4 Nd8 15. dxe5 dxe5 16. Bxb7 Nxb7 17. cxb4 {White emerges a pawn ahead.}) 11. Bd5 {Anyway. But Kramnik has something here too.} Ne7 $1 12. dxe5 Nfxd5 ({But not} 12... dxe5 13. Nxe5 Nexd5 14. Nc6 {and White wins.}) 13. exd5 O-O 14. exd6 Qxd6 15. c4 Nf5 {This is the position that Black was heading for. For the pawn he has the bishop pair and active pieces. Once he opens the position with c7-c6 he will be able to control both central files, as well as the important diagonals.} 16. Nbd2 ({Probably better was} 16. Qc1 {in order to support the bishop and keep it active after} Bb7 17. Bf4 Qd7) 16... f6 17. Bh4 Qf4 { The most forcing continuation after which Kramnik will regain the pawn. But apparently, he missed an important detail.} ({There were a lot of other tempting possibilities, like the immediate} 17... c6 18. dxc6 Qxc6 19. b3 Bb7 { with strong pressure along the diagonals.}) ({Also possible was} 17... Re8) ({ and even} 17... Nxh4 18. Nxh4 Bd7 {followed by c7-c6. In all cases Black would have had excellent compensation for a pawn.}) 18. Bg3 Nxg3 19. hxg3 Qxg3 { It seems as White is in trouble and the threat Bc8-h3 will finish him off, but Nepomniachtchi saw the excellent...} 20. c5 $1 {Which locks the dark-squared bishop for a long time.} Qg6 (20... Bxc5 $2 21. Ne4 {drops a piece.}) 21. Rc1 { Now White's task is to permanently lock the bishop into its prison cell and throw the key into the deepest river. Or sea.} Qf7 ({The active} 21... Bh3 { plays into White hands as he is generally happy to trade pieces:} 22. Nh4 Qg4 23. Rc4 Qxd1 24. Rxd1 Bd7 {Now there are tempting possibilities: to keep the dark-squared bishop locked with} 25. b3 ({or to restrain the light-squared bishop with} 25. c6 Bc8 26. Ne4 f5 27. Nc5)) 22. Ne4 {Supporting the d-pawn.} ( {This is much better than} 22. Nb3 Rd8 23. d6 cxd6 24. Na5 {which may lead to peculiar draw after} Bg4 $1 25. Nc6 Bxc5 26. Nxd8 Rxd8 27. Rxc5 Bxf3 28. gxf3 Qg6+ {with perpetual.}) 22... Re8 ({Here} 22... Rd8 23. d6 cxd6 24. Nxd6 { keeps the blockade.}) 23. Re1 Bf5 24. Ng3 $1 {Another brilliant decision. Nepomniachtchi is ready to part with the excellent central pawn while maintaining control of the position.} ({The obvious centralization} 24. Qd4 { gives Black time to regroup with} Rbd8 25. d6 {and later free himself with timely exchanges in the center. For example:} a5 (25... Bxe4 {might be also possible-} 26. Rxe4 cxd6 27. Rxe8+ Qxe8 28. Qd5+ Qf7 29. Qd2) 26. Nfd2 Bxe4 ({ Or} 26... Re5 27. Qc4 Qxc4 28. Nxc4) 27. Nxe4 h6 28. Qd3 f5 29. Qa6 fxe4 30. Qxa7 cxd6 31. Qxa5 dxc5 32. Qxc5 Rd2 {with a likely draw.}) 24... Rxe1+ 25. Qxe1 Bg4 {Strangely enough, this makes Black's position more difficult.} ({ The pawn was in fact poisonous:} 25... Qxd5 26. Nxf5 Qxf5 27. Qe7 {as the white pieces do whatever they want. Say} Rc8 ({Or} 27... Qc8 28. Nd4 Qd8 29. Qe6+ Kh8 30. Nc6 {and wins.}) 28. Nd4 Qe5 (28... Qg6 29. Qe6+) 29. Nc6 { and White wins material.}) ({However} 25... Bg6 $1 {was more stubborn, keeping control of the important e4 square.}) 26. Qe4 $1 {Powerful centralization.} h5 (26... Bxf3 27. Qxf3 {is exactly what White wants. He is practically a piece ahead.}) 27. Nf5 Re8 28. Qd3 Bb8 ({Notice that Black cannot free himself} 28... Qg6 $4 29. Ne7+) ({Just like before} 28... Bxf5 29. Qxf5 {plays into White's hands.}) 29. N3h4 {Surrounding the bishop.} Be2 30. Qd2 Bg4 31. Ne3 {A neat move.} ({In case of the immediate capture Black can get some play with} 31. Qxb4 a5 32. Qxa5 Qxd5) 31... Bd7 ({Nothing changes} 31... Bc8 32. Qxb4) 32. Qxb4 a5 33. Qxa5 c6 34. d6 {Poor bishop. Kramnik has won a miryad of positional masterpieces, but today it is Nepomniachtchi who paints his masterpiece.} Qb3 35. Qc3 Qxa4 36. Nhf5 Qe4 37. Ne7+ Kh8 38. Qb3 Rf8 39. Qc2 $1 Qxc2 40. Nxc2 Kh7 41. Nd4 1-0 [Event "46th GM 2018"] [Site "Dortmund GER"] [Date "2018.07.21"] [Round "6.3"] [White "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D05"] [WhiteElo "2792"] [BlackElo "2782"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "128"] [EventDate "2018.07.14"] 1. Nf3 {It must have been hard for both players when chosing the opening. After all Giri was Kramnik's second in Berlin earlier this year.} d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. d4 c5 4. Nbd2 e6 5. b3 cxd4 6. exd4 Bb4 ({Kramnik faced another move recently:} 6... Nc6 7. Bb2 g6 8. Bb5 Bg7 9. O-O O-O 10. Re1 Qb6 11. a4 Bd7 12. c4 a6 13. Bxc6 Bxc6 14. c5 Qc7 15. b4 Ne4 16. Ne5 {with an unclear position, Kramnik, V (2811) -Nakamura,H (2793) Zuerich 2017}) 7. Bb2 Ne4 8. Bd3 Nc6 9. O-O Bc3 10. Bxc3 Nxc3 11. Qe1 {Nothing new so far. Here Giri uncorkes a novelty.} Nb4 {This knight is actually heading to the kingside.} ({A predecessor saw White getting an edge after:} 11... Qb6 12. Qe3 h6 13. a4 Bd7 14. Nb1 $1 {Eidelmann,V (2049) -Gelzenleichter,S (2188) Wingst 2005}) 12. Nb1 Nxd3 13. Qxc3 Nf4 14. Qe3 Ng6 {End of the maneuver.} 15. c4 {In order to get some space White needs to allow hanging pawns.} dxc4 16. bxc4 O-O {However, since two pairs of light pieces have been traded White's central superiority is not that great. Black can happy with the opening outcome.} 17. Nc3 Bd7 { Black wants to put pressure on the c-pawn as quickly as possible. Notice that his knight on c6 is no longer obstructing the rook.} ({Also good was the fianchettoe-} 17... b6 {when} 18. d5 {can be met with either} exd5 ({or even} 18... Ba6 $5 19. dxe6 Bxc4) 19. cxd5 Bb7 {with approximate equality in either case.}) 18. Rfd1 {Kramnik on his turn wants to place his rooks behind the pawns and push one of them further. The central one, preferrably.} Rc8 19. Nd2 {A forced concession.} Nh4 {A good maneuver. The second central pawn will be put under pressure as well.} 20. Qd3 Nf5 21. Rac1 Qc7 22. d5 {The central breakthrough: check.} Rfd8 {Prepared for the central breakthrough: check.} 23. h3 b6 24. Nf3 {Forcing matters.} ({After} 24. Nce4 {Black can simply take the rook pair for the queen} exd5 (24... Bc6 $5) 25. cxd5 Qxc1 26. Rxc1 Rxc1+) 24... Qxc4 {There is no need to avoid this.} ({Worse was} 24... Qf4 25. dxe6 fxe6 26. Ne2) 25. Qxc4 Rxc4 26. dxe6 fxe6 27. Rd3 ({Nothing yields} 27. Ne5 Rd4 28. Ne2 Rd5) 27... e5 $1 {This subtle move was foreseen in advance.} ({Black experiences problems after} 27... Rdc8 28. Rxd7 Rxc3 29. Rxc3 Rxc3 30. Ng5 $1) ({He also has to be extremely careful, as whenever a pin is concerned there is always tactical trouble lurking:} 27... Kf8 $6 28. Rcd1 Ke7 $2 29. Rxd7+ Rxd7 30. Rxd7+ Kxd7 31. Ne5+) 28. Nxe5 ({Here} 28. Rcd1 {is not as impressive as after} Re8 ({Even better seems the tactical line} 28... Nd4 29. Nxe5 Bf5 30. Nxc4 Bxd3 31. Rxd3 Ne2+ 32. Nxe2 Rxd3 33. Ne3 Ra3 {when the rook is definitely not worse than the knights. In fact Black can force a draw if he likes with} 34. Nc1 Rc3 35. Ne2 Ra3) 29. Rxd7 Rxc3 30. Rxa7 e4 31. Ng5 h6 {The white knight is not comfortable.}) 28... Rd4 29. Rf3 Nh4 30. Re3 Nf5 {The hanging pawns disappeared and the game is heading towards the logical outcome.} 31. Ree1 {But Kramnik is looking for trouble.} Be8 32. Ne4 Ra4 33. Rc7 {The same policy, as agressive as possible.} ({There was nothing wrong with} 33. Rc2) ({ or} 33. Re2 {with equality in both cases.}) 33... Rxa2 34. Kh2 {I assume Kramnik wanted to prepare g2-g4, followed by Kh2-g3 once that the knight jumps on h4.} ({It was not too late to split the point with} 34. Ng4 {with the idea to force perpetual check after} b5 (34... h6 35. Nef6+ {leads to the same.}) ({ The only way to play for the win is} 34... Bf7 35. Ne5 Bb3 36. Nc6 Ra8 37. g4 Nh4 38. Re3 {although this seems more risky for Black than for White.}) 35. Nef6+ gxf6 36. Nxf6+ Kf8 37. Nxh7+) (34. g4 Nd4 {only helps Black.}) 34... h6 35. Ng4 Kf8 {Now the draw is rejected for good and White finds it hard to prove compensation.} (35... Bf7 $5 {also seemed fine.}) 36. Rec1 ({More to the point was} 36. Ne5 $5 {when} b5 {is met with} 37. Nc5) 36... Re2 37. f3 Nh4 ({ Here both} 37... a5 $5) ({or} 37... Nd4 {seem more precise.}) 38. Ngf2 Bg6 39. Rc8 ({The computer suggests instead the paradoxical} 39. Kg1 Bxe4 ({Black can still play for a win with} 39... a5 40. Ra7 Rb2) 40. fxe4 Kg8 41. Rxa7 Rf8 42. Rf1 {with good chances for a draw.}) 39... Re8 40. Kg3 {The last move before the time-control.} ({Better was the immediate} 40. Rxe8+ Kxe8 41. Rc8+ Kd7 42. Rg8 Bxe4 43. Rxg7+ Kc6 44. Nxe4 {when Black can play for a win with either} a5 {when his pawns should be faster.} ({Or with} 44... Nxf3+ 45. Kg3 Ne1 46. Kf4 Nxg2+ 47. Ke5 {counting on material.})) 40... Nf5+ 41. Kh2 Nd4 $1 {This is where the knight belongs.} 42. R1c3 ({Now} 42. Kg3 {does not help at all as after} a5 43. Rxe8+ Kxe8 44. Rc8+ Kd7 45. Rg8 {Black has} Bf7 46. Rxg7 Nf5+) 42... a5 43. R8c4 Rd8 44. Rc7 Ne6 {Very accurate.} ({The reckless machine suggests instead} 44... b5 45. Rb7 Bf7 46. Rcc7 Bd5 47. Ra7 b4 48. Rxg7 Nb5 49. Rae7 b3 {but this is not for any human's liking.}) 45. R7c6 Nf4 46. Rc8 ({ White should have tried his last chance:} 46. Kg3 $1 Nh5+ 47. Kg4 Nf6+ 48. Nxf6 ({Or} 48. Kg3 Bxe4 49. Nxe4 Nxe4+ (49... Rxe4 $5 50. Rxf6+ gxf6 51. fxe4 Ke7) 50. fxe4 Rxe4 51. Rxb6) 48... Rxf2 {It is hard to say if he would have saved himself, but it was a chance.}) 46... Re8 47. Rxe8+ Kxe8 48. Rc8+ Kd7 49. Rg8 Ne6 {Now it a technical win.} 50. Kg3 Kc7 51. h4 Rc2 $1 {Another neat maneuver. Giri defends everything in an optimal way and his pawns can walk on their own.} (51... a4 52. Ra8) 52. Ra8 Kb7 53. Rh8 Rc6 54. h5 Bxe4 55. Nxe4 a4 56. Re8 a3 57. Re7+ Ka6 58. Re8 Ka7 59. Nd2 a2 60. Nb3 Rc3 61. Na1 Rc1 62. Rxe6 Rxa1 63. Re2 b5 64. Kf4 Kb6 0-1 [Event "Dortmund GER"] [Site "Dortmund GER"] [Date "2018.07.22"] [Round "7.4"] [White "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Black "Meier, Georg"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C10"] [WhiteElo "2757"] [BlackElo "2628"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "53"] [EventDate "2018.07.14"] 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 {No surprises. Meier remains true to his beloved Rubinstein French.} 4. Nxe4 Nd7 5. Nf3 Ngf6 6. Nxf6+ Nxf6 7. Ne5 Bd6 ({In recent blitz games the German GM also tried} 7... Nd7 8. Bf4 Nxe5 9. Bxe5 f6 { but this led to a risk-free advantage for the first player after} 10. Bg3 (10. Bf4 c5 11. dxc5 Qxd1+ 12. Rxd1 Bxc5 13. Bc4 e5 14. Bd2 Ke7 {Karjakin,S (2783) -Meier,G (2630) chess.com INT 2017}) 10... c5 11. Bc4 cxd4 12. O-O Bd6 { Dominguez Perez, L (2739)-Meier,G (2628) chess.com INT 2018} 13. Re1 Bxg3 14. hxg3 O-O 15. Re4 Kh8 16. Rxd4 {Dominguez Perez,L (2739)-Meier,G (2628) chess. com INT 2018}) 8. Bg5 (8. Qf3 c5 9. Bb5+ Ke7 10. O-O cxd4 11. Bf4 g5 12. Bg3 h5 13. h3 g4 14. hxg4 hxg4 15. Qf4 Rh5 {Dominguez Perez,L (2739) -Meier,G (2628) chess.com INT 2018}) 8... h6 9. Bh4 O-O 10. Bd3 c5 11. Qe2 {A novelty. White improves on a game which actually saw a blunder.} ({After:} 11. Nc4 g5 { White was already losing material:} 12. Nxd6 Qxd6 13. dxc5 $2 ({Better was} 13. Bg3 Qxd4) 13... Qe5+ 14. Qe2 Qxe2+ 15. Kxe2 gxh4 {and Black went on to win in Fuss,J (1688)-Pieczka,R (1922) Germany 2012}) 11... Qa5+ {The most forcing move.} ({Perhaps Black will test} 11... cxd4 12. O-O-O {in the future.}) 12. c3 cxd4 13. Nc4 ({White could have also started with} 13. Bxf6 gxf6 14. Nc4 { Then if} Qd5 (14... Qc5 15. Qg4+ {transposes into the game.}) 15. Be4 Qc5 16. Nxd6 Qxd6 17. Qg4+ Kh8 18. Qh4 Kg7 {White can continue the attack with either} 19. O-O-O ({Or} 19. Rd1)) 13... Qc5 (13... Qd5 {might transpose to the line from above.}) 14. Bxf6 gxf6 15. Qg4+ {transposes into the game.} Kh8 16. cxd4 { All of this is pretty forced and I suspect that both players had it on their home computers.} ({Also interesting looks} 16. Qh4 Kg7 17. cxd4 Qb4+ 18. Ke2) 16... Qb4+ 17. Kf1 $1 {An important move. The king stays away from the black queen.} (17. Ke2 {looks more logical. However, the concrete lines after:} Bc7 18. Qe4 f5 19. Qh4 Kh7 20. g4 b5 21. g5 bxc4 (21... Bf4 $5 {mgith actually be even better.}) 22. Qxh6+ Kg8 23. g6 Qxb2+ $1 {Lead only to perpetual. For example:} 24. Bc2 ({Or} 24. Kf1 Qxa1+ 25. Kg2 Qxh1+ 26. Kxh1 Bb7+ 27. Kg1 fxg6 28. Qxg6+ {and White has to do the perpetual.}) 24... Qxc2+ 25. Kf1 Qd3+ 26. Kg1 (26. Ke1 $4 Ba5+) (26. Kg2 Qe4+ 27. f3 (27. Kh3 $4 Qg4#) 27... Qe2+ 28. Kg1 fxg6 {leads to the same.}) 26... fxg6 27. Qxg6+ {and again White needs to accept the draw as he cannot use the g-file for his rook.}) 17... Bc7 18. Qe4 $1 {Another important move which drags the pawn on a vulnerable position.} (18. Qh4 Kg7) 18... f5 19. Qh4 Kg7 {After this move the computers immediately go bananas, claiming win for White.} ({However, even after the most precise} 19... Kh7 20. g4 b5 ({If} 20... Rg8 21. gxf5 exf5 22. Qf6 {looks good for White.}) 21. g5 {with the cunning idea} Rh8 $1 ({Not} 21... bxc4 22. Qxh6+ Kg8 23. g6 fxg6 24. Qxg6+ Kh8 25. Rg1 $1 {with unavoidable mate.}) 22. Rg1 $3 {White keeps a strong attack. Say} ({Not} 22. Qxh6+ Kg8 23. Qf6 Qf8 {and Black defends with good position.}) 22... h5 23. g6+ $1 fxg6 24. Be2 bxc4 ({Better is } 24... Bd8 {although White keeps strong attack after} 25. Qg3 g5 ({If} 25... Rg8 26. Ne5 Qxd4 27. Nxg6 Qg7 28. Qf3 Bb7 29. Nf8+ Qxf8 30. Qxh5+ Qh6 31. Qxh6+ Kxh6 32. Rxg8 {with solid extra exchange for White.}) 26. Ne5 Bb7 27. Nf7 Qe7 ( {Or} 27... Rg8 28. Nxd8 Raxd8 29. Qc7+ Kh6 30. Qxb7) 28. Bxh5 {the weak black king is the key factor of the position.}) 25. Bxh5 $1 {and mate comes soon.}) 20. g4 {Opens the files for the major pieces. The attack is unstoppable.} f4 ( 20... fxg4 {leads to forced mate after} 21. Qxg4+ Kf6 22. Qh4+ Kg7 23. Rg1+) ({ The preliminary} 20... Bd8 {does not change much} 21. Qh5 Qe7 22. h4 Qf6 23. Ne5 fxg4 24. Qxg4+ Kh8 25. Rg1 {with winning attack.}) 21. Rg1 Bd7 ({Here} 21... Rh8 {is not as convincing as before due to} 22. Qh5 $1 ({But not} 22. g5 h5 $1) 22... b6 23. g5 Ba6 24. Rc1 {The attack will soon decide.}) 22. Qh5 $1 { The final touch, which secures the opening of the g-file.} (22. g5 $2 h5 $1 { would have been awkward for White.}) 22... Rh8 (22... f6 23. Qg6+ Kh8 24. Qh7#) 23. g5 hxg5 24. Qxg5+ Kf8 25. Qf6 Rxh2 ({Or} 25... Rh3 26. Rg7 Qe7 27. Rg8+ { picking up the queen.}) 26. Rg7 Be8 27. Bh7 (27. Bh7 {Meier resigned due to} Rh1+ 28. Kg2 Bc6+ 29. f3 {The end of the fast and furious attack. Excellent preparation by Nepomniachtchi!}) 1-0 [Event "Dortmund GM"] [Site "Dortmund"] [Date "2018.07.22"] [Round "7"] [White "Kovalev, Vladislav"] [Black "Kramnik, Vladimir"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [WhiteElo "2655"] [BlackElo "2792"] [Annotator "Efstratios Grivas"] [PlyCount "208"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Bc5 5. Ng5 Nh6 6. Nxf7 Nxf7 7. Bxf7+ Kxf7 8. Qh5+ g6 9. Qxc5 d5 10. O-O dxe4 11. c3 Re8 12. cxd4 Nxd4 13. Nc3 b6 14. Qc4+ Be6 15. Qa4 c5 16. Nxe4 Bd5 17. f3 Bxe4 18. fxe4+ Kg7 19. Qc4 Kh8 20. b4 Rxe4 21. Bb2 Qg8 22. Rf7 Rf8 23. Rxf8 Qxf8 24. bxc5 bxc5 25. Rf1 Qe7 26. Qd5 Kg7 27. h3 g5 28. Bc3 a6 29. Kh1 Kh6 30. Rb1 Nb5 {(D) [#] Looks like Black is doing fine, except that White has a nice tactical continuation at his disposal.} 31. Bf6 $1 Qxf6 32. Qxe4 Nc3 {(D) [#] Black was depending on this fork...} 33. Qf3 $1 Qxf3 34. Rb6+ $1 {The point of the combination that started with 31.Bf6! - White wins the exchange.} Kh5 35. gxf3 Nxa2 36. Rc6 $1 Nb4 37. Rxc5 Nd3 38. Ra5 Kh4 39. Kh2 Nf4 40. Rxa6 {(D) [#] So White got a winning ending. Well, it is not such an easy one as someone might think. White has to exchange his h-pawn and then invade with his king. Black has a drawing set-up with his king on e6/ f6/g6 and his knight on h4- or on e5-squares, controlling important invasion squares and putting pressure on the white f3-pawn.} Kh5 (40... h5 41. Ra4 $18 { , loses on the spot.}) 41. Rd6 (41. Ra4 Kh4 42. Ra7 h6 43. Ra2 Kh5 44. Kg3 Nd5 45. Ra8 Nf4 46. h4 $1 Ne2+ 47. Kf2 Nf4 48. hxg5 hxg5 49. Ke3 $18 {, was another way to prevail.}) 41... Ne2 42. Rd2 Nf4 43. Kg3 Ng6 44. Rd7 h6 45. Rf7 Ne5 46. Rf5 Ng6 47. Ra5 Nf4 {(D) [#]} (47... Nh4 {, loses to} 48. f4 Ng6 49. f5 Nh4 50. Rb5 $18 {.}) 48. h4 $1 Ne2+ 49. Kf2 Nf4 50. hxg5 hxg5 51. Ke3 $1 { White must invade with his king before Black would set-up his defensive method. } Ng2+ 52. Kf2 ({Not drawing yet, but of course the natural} 52. Ke4 Kg6 53. Ra6+ Kh5 54. Ra2 Nh4 55. Rh2 $18 {, was curtains.}) 52... Nf4 {(D) [#]} 53. Ra8 $2 ({But this is a serious mistake, throwing the win away. Good was} 53. Ke3 Kg6 54. Ke4 Ng2 55. Ra6+ Kh5 56. Ra2 Nh4 (56... Nf4 57. Kf5 $18) 57. Rh2 Kh6 58. f4 Kg6 59. Rh1 $1 Nf5 (59... Kf6 60. f5 $18) 60. Rg1 Nd6+ 61. Ke5 Nf7+ 62. Ke6 Nd8+ 63. Kd6 Nf7+ 64. Ke7 $18 {.}) 53... Kg6 $1 {V. Kramnik is quite experianced and his knowledge is huge, so he couldn't missed his chance - the position is now drawn.} 54. Ke3 Ng2+ $1 {Again the only move - the knight has to be placed on h4.} 55. Ke4 Nh4 56. Ra6+ Kf7 (56... Kg7 {was the other drawing move.}) 57. Ra2 Kf6 58. Ra1 Ke6 59. Rh1 Ng6 60. Rh6 Kf6 61. Rh7 Nh4 62. Ke3 Ng6 63. Ra7 Nh4 64. Ra6+ Kf5 65. Kf2 Ng6 66. Kg3 {(D) [#]} Ne5 $1 ({ The only drawing move here. Bad was} 66... Nh4 $2 67. f4 $18 {.}) 67. Ra8 Ng6 68. Rg8 Ne5 69. Rf8+ {(D) [#]} Ke6 $1 ({Accurate, as} 69... Kg6 $2 {was losing to} 70. Kf2 $1 Nf7 71. Ke3 {, as Black cannot place his knight on h4.}) 70. Kf2 Ng6 71. Rb8 Kf5 72. Rb5+ Kf6 73. Ra5 {(D) [#]} Ne5 $1 (73... Nh4 $2 {was losing to} 74. Kg3 $18 {. As a guide, when the white king goes to the g-file, the black knight should be around the e5-square, while when the white king goes to the e-file, the knight should go around the h4-square.}) 74. Ke2 Ng6 75. Ra6+ Kf5 76. Ke3 Nh4 $1 (76... Ne5 $2 77. Ra5 Kf6 78. Ke4 $18 {.}) 77. Ra5+ Kf6 78. Ke4 Kg6 $1 (78... Ng2 $2 79. Ra6+ Kf7 80. Kf5 Nh4+ 81. Kg4 $18 {.}) 79. Ra1 Kf6 80. Rg1 Nf5 81. Rg2 Nh4 82. Rh2 Ng6 83. Rh5 Nf4 $1 (83... Nh4 $2 84. f4 $18 {.}) 84. Rh8 (84. Rh6+ Ng6 $1 {, was good as well.}) 84... Ng6 $1 85. Rb8 { (D) [#]} Nh4 $1 86. Rg8 Ng6 87. Kd4 Kf5 88. Ke3 Kf6 89. Ke4 Kf7 (89... Nh4 { , was good as well.}) 90. Rb8 Nh4 $1 91. Rc8 Kf6 92. Rc1 Ke6 93. Ke3 Kf5 94. Rc5+ Kf6 95. Rb5 Ng6 96. Ke4 Nh4 $1 97. Rd5 {(D) [#]} Kg6 $1 (97... Ng2 $2 98. Rd6+ Kf7 99. Kf5 $18 {.}) 98. f4 {A last try...} gxf4 99. Kxf4 Kf7 100. Kg5 Nf3+ 101. Kf4 Nh4 102. Kg5 Nf3+ 103. Kg4 {(D) [#]} Ke6 $1 ({The last accurate move, so the knight can be placed in a central square next to its king. Losing was} 103... Ne1 $2 104. Rd2 $18 {.}) 104. Kxf3 (104. Ra5 Ne5+ $11 {.}) 104... Kxd5 1/2-1/2 [Event "Dortmund Sparkassen Chess Meeting"] [Site "?"] [Date "2018.07.22"] [Round "7"] [White "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Black "Meier, Georg"] [Result "1-0"] [WhiteElo "2757"] [BlackElo "2628"] [Annotator "Lawrence"] [PlyCount "53"] [EventDate "2018.??.??"] {Of course the question on everyone's lips before the round was whether Nepo was going to win today and clinch sole first. Let's see if he was up to the task after surviving a busted position yesterday.} 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 {Georg stays faithful to his beloved Rubenstein French.} 4. Nxe4 Nd7 5. Nf3 Ngf6 6. Nxf6+ Nxf6 7. Ne5 $5 {reassonably rare although it seems Leinier Dominguez got the better of Georg in this line earlier this year (albeit in blitz).} (7. Bd3) (7. c3) (7. Bg5) (7. Be3) (7. g3) (7. Bc4 {have all been played many times.}) 7... Bd6 {Georg repeats the line he played in his 2nd game against Dominguez} (7... Nd7 8. Bf4 Nxe5 9. Bxe5 f6 10. Bg3 c5 11. Bc4 cxd4 12. O-O Bd6 13. Re1 Bxg3 14. hxg3 O-O 15. Re4 Kh8 16. Rxd4 Qc7 17. Bb3 e5 18. Rd2 Bf5 19. Qf3 Bg6 20. Rad1 Rad8 21. Kh2 Rxd2 22. Rxd2 b6 23. Qd5 h5 24. Qd7 Rc8 25. c3 Kh7 26. Be6 Qxd7 27. Rxd7 Re8 28. Bd5 a5 29. Rb7 Rd8 30. c4 Rd6 31. Kg1 Kh6 32. f3 Bb1 33. a3 g5 34. Kf2 h4 35. g4 Kg6 36. b4 axb4 37. axb4 f5 38. Ke3 fxg4 39. fxg4 Kf6 40. b5 Bg6 41. Rc7 Be8 42. Be4 Bf7 43. c5 bxc5 44. Rxc5 Be6 45. Bf3 Rd4 46. b6 Rb4 47. b7 Rb3+ 48. Kd2 Bxg4 49. Bd5 Rb6 50. Rc6+ { 1-0 (50) Dominguez Perez,L (2739)-Meier,G (2628) chess.com INT 2018}) (7... c5 $5 {has to be critical e.g.} 8. Bb5+ Bd7 9. Nxd7 Qa5+ $5 {is cute} 10. c3 Qxb5 11. Nxf8 O-O-O $3 {with what looks like a fantastic game for Black}) (7... Be7 {looks playable}) 8. Bg5 $5 {also very natural} (8. Qf3 c5 9. Bb5+ Ke7 10. O-O cxd4 11. Bf4 $44 {looked dangerous for Black but I am sure Georg had an improvement up his sleeve around here} g5 12. Bg3 h5 13. h3 g4 14. hxg4 hxg4 15. Qf4 Rh5 16. Rfe1 Qh8 17. Nc6+ Ke8 18. Ne5+ Kf8 19. Kf1 Rf5 20. Qxd4 Be7 21. Bd3 Rh5 22. Rad1 Rh1+ 23. Ke2 Rh5 24. Kd2 Nd5 25. Kc1 Bf6 26. Kb1 Ne7 27. Bc4 Nc6 28. Qd6+ Be7 29. Qc7 {1-0 (29) Dominguez Perez,L (2739)-Meier,G (2628) chess.com INT 2018}) 8... h6 9. Bh4 O-O (9... Bxe5 $2 10. dxe5 Qxd1+ 11. Rxd1 Nd5 12. Bb5+ c6 13. Bd3 $14 {is very unpleasant for Black to play.}) 10. Bd3 c5 11. Qe2 $5 {I guess this is what Nepo had looked at beforehand.} Qa5+ $5 (11... cxd4 {is the first move you have to look at} 12. O-O {I think castling short here is ideal as White avoids any potential attack against the king compared to long castles in such positions. Now the question is how does Black complete development?} Be7 $5 13. Rad1 Nd5 14. Bxe7 Qxe7 {and I don't see how White achieves a serious advantage}) 12. c3 cxd4 13. Nc4 $1 {This is the problem with inserting Qa5+ here, White has this important move} Qc5 (13... Qd5 $5) 14. Bxf6 gxf6 {also the point, White manages to wreck the Black kingside. Things are far from clear though.} 15. Qg4+ Kh8 {White needs to act fast here else Black will consolidate and have a significant advantage.} 16. cxd4 (16. Qh4 $5 Kg7 17. cxd4 {the reason why 13...Qd5!? might be more precise - Black's queen isn't hit with tempo} Qb4+ 18. Ke2 $1 {and I'd take White all day}) 16... Qb4+ 17. Kf1 $6 (17. Ke2 {as per the previous line seems to be more precise, even if it looks a bit scary}) 17... Bc7 {is fine, but also} (17... Rg8 $5 18. Qh5 Bf8 19. Qxf7 Qe7 20. Qxe7 Bxe7 {and I find it difficult to believe Black can't hold this}) 18. Qe4 f5 19. Qh4 Kg7 $4 {unfortunately Georg makes the most natural move which happens to be the losing move} (19... Kh7 $1 {was correct after which} 20. g4 b5 $1 21. g5 (21. gxf5 bxc4 22. f6+ cxd3 23. Qe4+ Kh8 24. Qe3 Kh7 25. Qe4+ Kh8 26. Qe3 {is a cute repetition}) 21... Bf4 $1 (21... Rh8 $5 22. Rg1 h5 23. g6+ $1 fxg6 24. Be2 {is apparently very dangerous for Black}) 22. Qxf4 bxc4 23. Qh4 Qd2 $1 24. Qxh6+ Kg8 {and apparently this position is around level} 25. Be2 Rb8 26. Rd1 Qf4 $11) 20. g4 $1 {the difference now is that Black's king walks into some nasty threats on the g-file} f4 (20... b5 21. gxf5 bxc4 22. f6+ Kh8 23. Qxh6+ Kg8 24. Qh7#) (20... Bd8 21. Qh5 Qe7 22. h4 $1 {and White will crash through} fxg4 23. Qxg4+ Kh8 24. Qh5 Qf6 25. Ne5 $18) 21. Rg1 $1 Bd7 22. Qh5 $3 {Nepo was very switched on. Now Black cannot stop White opening the king up with g5 and crashing through.} (22. g5 $4 {was Georg's last trick} h5 $1 23. g6 f6 24. Qxh5 Rh8 {and suddenly it's Black who is close to winning!}) 22... Rh8 23. g5 hxg5 (23... Kf8 24. gxh6 {doesn't change the evaluation}) 24. Qxg5+ Kf8 25. Qf6 $1 {and Black is busted} Rxh2 26. Rg7 Be8 27. Bh7 {And with this victory Ian wins the tournament and jumps up to world number 12. No doubt he'll be looking to consolidate his place in the top 10 in the very near future.} 1-0 [Event "51st Biel GM 2018"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.22"] [Round "1.1"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Navara, David"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D30"] [WhiteElo "2842"] [BlackElo "2741"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "127"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 e6 4. Bg5 Bb4+ 5. Nc3 h6 6. Bxf6 Qxf6 7. e3 O-O 8. Rc1 dxc4 9. Bxc4 c5 10. dxc5 ({White did not get much after} 10. O-O cxd4 11. Ne4 Qe7 12. a3 Ba5 13. Qxd4 Rd8 14. Qc5 Qxc5 15. Nxc5 Nd7 16. Nb3 Bb6 {Bu,X (2718)-Wei,Y (2734) Hangzhou 2018}) 10... Nd7 11. O-O ({The world champ had lots of experience with Black as well, e.g.} 11. c6 Ne5 12. Nxe5 Qxe5 13. O-O bxc6 14. Qe2 Rd8 15. Rfd1 Bb7 {was Giri,A (2790)-Carlsen,M (2863) Shamkir 2015} ) 11... Nxc5 12. Nb5 a6 13. Nbd4 {All of this has been played before and Navara comes up with a novelty.} b5 ({White did well after} 13... Ba5 14. a3 Bb6 15. b4 Ne4 16. Qd3 Ng5 17. Nxg5 hxg5 18. Qe4 {when the dominant position of the queen on e4 is a factor, Salem,A (2638)-Peralta,F (2556) Sitges 2017}) 14. Be2 $5 {The world champion provokes Black's next.} ({Safer seemed} 14. a3 bxc4 (14... Na4 {might be a possibility as well} 15. Bxb5 axb5 16. axb4 Bb7) 15. Rxc4 Bxa3 16. bxa3 {hoping for an edge in the symmetrical position after} Nd7 ({Or} 16... Ne4 17. Nc6) 17. Nc6) 14... e5 15. Nc2 (15. a3 {was still possible, but it would not yield White much after} exd4 16. Nxd4 Rd8 17. axb4 Ne6 18. Bf3 Rb8) 15... Rd8 {The white queen is trapped, but...} ({Of course not } 15... Ba5 16. b4) 16. Nxb4 {This was on purpose.} Rxd1 17. Rfxd1 {So far Carlsen collected only a rook and a knight for his strongest piece. However, he got both the open files for his rooks, the knight on c5 is hanging and there is also the threat of Nb4-d5.} a5 $1 ({The knight cannot retreat since} 17... Ne6 $2 18. Nd5 {puts the black queen in danger and he would lose material after} Qd8 19. Nc7) ({Also bad is} 17... Qe7 $2 18. Nc6) ({whereas} 17... Qb6 $6 18. Nd5 Qa7 19. b4 Ne6 (19... Nd7 $4 20. Ne7+) 20. Nxe5 {is clearly inferior pawn loss compared to the game.}) 18. Nd5 Qd6 19. Nxe5 { Collecting a pawn as well. White has enough material now, but Navara can also catch his breath...} Bb7 {...and finish the development.} ({There was an argument for the exchange sacrifice too:} 19... Qxe5 $5 20. Rxc5 Qxb2 21. Bf3 Be6 22. Ne7+ Kf8 23. Bxa8 Kxe7 {since the black queenside passers are dangerous.}) 20. Bf3 ({Carlsen suggested} 20. f4 {as "a critical try."}) 20... Rc8 ({Here} 20... Qxe5 {is not as effective for Black, but still playable after } 21. Rxc5 b4 22. b3) 21. Ng4 {With the threat of Nd5-f6+} Qf8 (21... Kh8 $5) 22. h4 {Opens air for the knight and restricts the black one.} ({White apparently disliked} 22. h3 Ne6 {followed by Ne6-g5.}) 22... Nd7 {Correctly trading one of the active white rooks.} 23. Rxc8 Bxc8 24. a3 h5 (24... f5 { seems good as well, say} 25. Nh2 Nf6 (25... Ne5 $5) 26. Nf1 Be6 {with an approximately even game.}) 25. Nh2 g6 {Defending the kingside.} ({Instead, I believe that Navara should have gone for the white queenside pawns with} 25... Ne5 26. Bxh5 Nc4 27. Rc1 {and now} Bd7 $1 {when it is not that easy to defend the queenside. For example} ({but not the hasty} 27... Nxb2 $4 28. Rxc8) 28. Rc2 ({And if} 28. Nf4 Nxb2 29. Rc7 Qd8) 28... Bf5 {Whenever there is play on two flanks, the queen becomes stronger.}) 26. Be2 Ne5 {Sacrificing a second pawn.} ({There was nothing wrong with} 26... Qc5 27. Nf3 b4 ({Or} 27... Kg7) 28. axb4 axb4 {and there is no easy way for White to get his hands on the b4 pawn.}) 27. Bxb5 Bb7 28. Nc3 Qe7 29. Rd4 {Now White tries to get the type of game that the smaller pieces want. Slowly but surely they are shifted to optimal positions. In the process they defend each other and try to get closer to the black king.} Qe6 30. Nf1 Qb3 $1 {Naturally Navara does not like to sit and wait until the white pieces occupy all the good squares.} 31. Rd2 Nc4 32. Rd7 $1 {Carlsen sacrifices a pawn on his turn.} ({He cannot reach stability once that the bishop is traded:} 32. Bxc4 Qxc4 {For example} 33. Rd7 Qc6 34. Rd5 Qb6 35. Rd2 Qc6 36. f3 Qf6 37. Rd4 Qb6 38. b4 Qc7 39. Ne4 Bxe4 40. Rxe4 axb4 41. axb4 Qc1 {followed by Qc1-e1 with a likely draw to follow.}) 32... Nxb2 33. Rxb7 Qxc3 34. Be8 {That was the point. White makes it to the kingside. But is he fast enough?} Kf8 35. Bxf7 Qc6 $1 ({Worse was} 35... Qxa3 36. Bxg6) 36. Rxb2 Kxf7 37. Rd2 $1 {Heading for the stable set up with the Rd4 and pawns on a4 and h4. Next, the knight will come to help.} Qa4 {Grabbing the h-pawn.} ( {It is extremely difficult to say if Black has better defensive chances if he includes the move} 37... a4 {Most likely White should find a way to break through, say} 38. Rd4 Qc2 39. Rb4 Kf6 40. g3 (40. e4 $5) 40... Qd1 41. e4 g5 42. Rb6+ Kg7 43. hxg5 Qd3 44. Re6 Qxa3 45. Ne3 {The united efforts of the white rook, knight and pawn make his chances better.}) 38. Rd3 Qxh4 39. Rd7+ Kg8 40. Rd4 Qe7 41. a4 {White definitely does not risk to lose. The question is if he has enough resources to bring his e-pawn into motion.} Qa3 42. g3 Qa1 43. Kg2 g5 44. Nd2 g4 $1 {This looks logical as the pawn helps the queen create perpetual check ideas.} 45. Ne4 Qc1 {But this is unnecessary.} ({ Simple and good seems} 45... Kg7 $1 46. Nc5 Qa2 {The queen is heading to e2 and if the white knight goes too far away-} 47. Nb7 $6 ({Stronger is} 47. Nd3 Qc2 48. Nf4 {although it is still not obvious how realistic White's chances for a win are-} Qc6+ 49. Kh2 Kh6 {For example} 50. e4 Qc2 51. Kg2 Qb3) 47... Qe2 48. Nxa5 $2 {White might suffer} Qf3+ 49. Kg1 h4 $1 50. gxh4 g3) 46. Nf6+ Kf7 47. Nxh5 Qc6+ 48. Kg1 Qc1+ {Right after the game Navara thought that this was the decisive mistake.} 49. Kh2 Kg6 ({Navara had planned} 49... Qc2 { but here he noticed that after} 50. Rf4+ Kg6 {the knight is not trapped and} 51. Nf6 {is just over.}) 50. Nf4+ Kf6 51. Ng2 Kg5 $2 {Wrong direction.} ({ The king should have stayed in front of the potential passer:} 51... Qc8 52. Rf4+ Ke5 53. Nh4 Qc2) 52. Rf4 Qd1 53. Nh4 Qc2 54. Nf5 Qd3 55. e4 $1 {The problem is not that the pawn moves per se. the problem is that the e3 square is vacated for the knight and thus the g4 pawn cannot be saved.} Qd7 ({Or} 55... Kf6 56. Ne3+ Ke6 57. Nxg4 Qe2 58. e5 {when White slowly convert.}) 56. e5 Qh7+ ({If} 56... Qd5 57. Ne3 {anyway, since} Qxe5 58. Rf5+) 57. Kg1 Qg6 58. Nd6 Qe6 ({Navara had seen that the pawn ending is losing, but he had also seen that } 58... Qb1+ {is hopeless:} 59. Kh2 Qh7+ 60. Kg2 Qc7 61. Rf5+ Kg6 62. Rf6+ Kh5 63. Rf4 Kg5 64. Re4) 59. Rf5+ (59. Ne4+ Kg6 60. Rf6+ Kh5 61. Rxe6 $4 {would be stalemate.} (61. Nd6)) 59... Qxf5 60. Nxf5 Kxf5 61. f4 gxf3 62. Kf2 Kxe5 63. Kxf3 Kf5 64. Ke3 (64. Ke3 {The endgame is lost by just one tempo:} Kg4 65. Kd4 Kxg3 66. Kc5 Kf4 67. Kb5 Ke5 68. Kxa5 Kd6 69. Kb6 Kd7 70. Kb7) 1-0 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.22"] [Round "1.2"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Georgiadis, Nico"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A15"] [WhiteElo "2801"] [BlackElo "2526"] [PlyCount "55"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. c4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. e3 a6 (4... Be7 5. b3 O-O 6. Bb2 b6 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Nxd5 exd5 9. Qc2 c5 10. a3 Nc6 11. Bb5 Bb7 12. O-O Rc8 {Carlsen,M (2843)-Karjakin,S (2782) Stavanger 2018}) 5. b3 c5 (5... Bd6 6. Bb2 O-O 7. g4 Nxg4 8. Rg1 f5 9. cxd5 e5 10. h3 Nf6 11. Ng5 Qe7 {Nepomniachtchi,I (2729) -Anand,V (2782) London ENG 2017}) 6. Bb2 Nc6 7. cxd5 exd5 8. Rc1 $1 {Already a new move, and worked out by Mamedyarov at home.} (8. d4 cxd4 9. Nxd4 Bd6 10. Be2 O-O 11. O-O Re8 12. Rc1 Bc7 13. Bf3 Qd6 {Froewis,G (2439) -Schwabeneder,F (2382) Graz 2017}) 8... Bg4 {"Not correct." (Mamedyarov)} (8... Be7 9. Be2 O-O 10. d4 {is "a bad position for Black." (Mamedyarov)}) ({He suggested Black should go} 8... d4 {but White is still better after} 9. Na4 dxe3 10. fxe3 ({or } 10. dxe3)) ({The best option might be Danny King's suggestion} 8... b5 { to prevent Na4 altogether when} 9. a4 d4 (9... b4 10. Nb1) 10. exd4 Nxd4 (10... cxd4 11. Nxb5) 11. axb5 Bd6 {is actually better Black according to the engine.} ) 9. h3 Bh5 10. Na4 Nd7 (10... Ne4 11. g4 Bg6 12. d3 Qa5+ 13. Nd2 {Georgiadis}) 11. Be2 b5 (11... Be7 12. O-O (12. g4 Bg6 13. Bxg7) 12... O-O 13. d4 { Mamedyarov}) 12. Nc3 Nf6 (12... Nb6 13. g4 Bg6 14. Nxb5 $5 axb5 15. Bxb5 Rc8 16. Ne5 Qd6 17. d4) 13. O-O Be7 (13... Bd6 14. a4 b4 15. Nb1 O-O 16. d4 Ne4 17. Nbd2 {is also good for White.}) 14. a4 Bxf3 (14... d4 15. exd4 cxd4 16. Nxb5 d3 17. Bxd3 Qxd3 18. Nc7+ Kd7 19. g4 Nxg4 20. Nxa8 Nh2 21. Nb6+ Ke8 22. Rxc6 Nxf3+ 23. Kh1 {is an amazing computer line.}) 15. Bxf3 Rb8 16. axb5 axb5 17. Ne2 { White is clearly better.} Qd6 (17... c4 18. d3) 18. Nf4 Nb4 ({The problem with } 18... Ne5 {is} 19. Bxe5 $1 Qxe5 20. Nd3 Qc7 21. Nxc5 Bxc5 22. b4) 19. Ba3 Na6 $6 {Tactically there's a problem with this.} (19... O-O 20. d4 c4) 20. d4 b4 21. Bb2 O-O 22. Bxd5 $1 Nxd5 23. dxc5 Nxc5 24. Nxd5 Rfd8 $6 ({Protecting the knight with} 24... Rfc8 {made more sense but} 25. Nxe7+ Qxe7 26. Qg4 f6 (26... Ne6 27. Bxg7 $1) 27. Rc4 $1 Ne6 28. Rfc1 Rxc4 29. Rxc4 {still gives White an overwhelming advantage.}) 25. Qg4 Bf8 26. Nf6+ Kh8 27. Qf5 g6 (27... gxf6 28. Bxf6+ Bg7 29. Bxd8 Rxd8 30. Rxc5) 28. Ne4+ {With 29.Qxc5 next.} 1-0 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.23"] [Round "2.2"] [White "Navara, David"] [Black "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C80"] [WhiteElo "2741"] [BlackElo "2801"] [PlyCount "88"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5 8. dxe5 Be6 9. Nbd2 Nc5 10. c3 d4 11. Bxe6 Nxe6 12. cxd4 Ncxd4 13. a4 Rb8 14. axb5 axb5 15. Ne4 Qd5 (15... Be7 16. Nxd4 Qxd4 17. Qxd4 Nxd4 18. Be3 Nc2 19. Ra7 Nxe3 20. fxe3 Rc8 {Mazur,S (2459)-Talla,V (2436) Senica 2017}) 16. Nxd4 Nxd4 17. Ng3 ( 17. Nc3 Qc4 18. Be3 Nf5 19. Qf3 Nh4 20. Qh3 Be7 21. Rfd1 O-O {De Firmian,N (2595)-Abdel Megid,M (2370) Luzern 1989}) 17... g6 {"My home preparation." (Mamedyarov)} 18. Be3 Rd8 (18... c5 $6 19. b4) 19. Bg5 Be7 20. Bxe7 Kxe7 21. Qg4 $1 {Missed by Mamedyarov, who immediately errs.} Ne6 $6 ({Navara expected} 21... Rhe8 {and White might only have a slight edge.}) 22. Qh4+ (22. f4 { was also strong.}) 22... g5 23. Qb4+ ({Very strong was} 23. Nf5+ Ke8 {and now} 24. Qh6 $1 Qxe5 25. g4 $1 {as shown by the engine. When looking at this position, Mamedyarov quickly realized he is lost here.}) 23... Qc5 24. Qe4 Qc4 25. Nf5+ Ke8 26. Qxc4 bxc4 27. Rfc1 Rd2 28. Ra8+ Rd8 29. Rca1 $6 {Losing a tempo compared to the game.} ({Initially Navara thought it's not much for White after} 29. Rxd8+ Kxd8 30. Rxc4 Kd7 31. h4 Rb8 {but later he realized that this is much better compared to the game. After} 32. hxg5 Rxb2 33. f4 c5 34. g3 Kc6 35. Ra4 {Navara pointed out a funny self-mate:} Kd5 36. Ne7#) 29... Rf8 $1 {Missed by Navara.} 30. h4 Rxa8 31. Rxa8+ Kd7 32. Ra4 Rb8 33. Rxc4 Rxb2 34. hxg5 c5 35. Rh4 Nxg5 36. f4 Ne6 37. Nd6 Rb4 38. g3 c4 39. f5 Ng5 40. Kf2 Rb2+ 41. Ke3 c3 42. Nxf7 c2 43. e6+ Ke7 44. Rc4 Nxf7 1/2-1/2 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.23"] [Round "2.3"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Georgiadis, Nico"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B51"] [WhiteElo "2753"] [BlackElo "2526"] [PlyCount "111"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nd7 4. O-O a6 5. Bd3 Ngf6 6. Re1 (6. c3 b5 7. a4 c4 8. Be2 Bb7 9. axb5 axb5 10. Rxa8 Bxa8 11. Na3 Bxe4 12. Nxb5 d5 13. b3 cxb3 14. Qxb3 e6 {Svidler,P (2753)-Nepomniachtchi,I (2757) Jerusalem 2018}) 6... e6 7. a4 b6 8. c3 Bb7 9. Qe2 Qc7 10. Na3 Be7 11. Bc2 Rc8 12. d3 O-O 13. Bd2 Rfe8 14. Rac1 (14. b4 cxb4 15. cxb4 Qb8 16. Bb3 a5 17. bxa5 bxa5 18. Reb1 Qa8 19. h3 Ba6 {Iordachescu,V (2600)-Sadzikowski,D (2547) Gallipoli 2017}) 14... e5 15. Bb3 d5 16. exd5 Nxd5 ({Svidler preferred} 16... Bxd5 {saying "I have zero hopes of anything at all."}) 17. Qe4 Nxc3 (17... Nf4 $5) 18. Bxf7+ Kxf7 19. Qf5+ Kg8 20. Bxc3 Bf6 21. Nc4 Qc6 22. Ncxe5 Nxe5 23. Bxe5 Qd5 24. Re3 Bxe5 25. Rxe5 Rxe5 26. Qxe5 Qxd3 27. Qe6+ Kh8 28. Re1 h6 (28... Qg6 $5 29. Qd7 Qc6 30. Qe7 {Svidler}) 29. h3 (29. h4 $5 {Svidler}) 29... b5 30. Ne5 Qd5 31. Qg4 Kh7 $6 ({Better was} 31... Rd8 {and after} 32. Ng6+ Kh7 33. Nf4 Qf7 34. axb5 axb5 {it's still unpleasant but probably equal, e.g.} 35. Re5 Rf8) 32. Qg6+ Kg8 33. f3 Qd2 $6 ({ There was actually time for} 33... bxa4 {since} 34. Ng4 {can be met by} Qg5) 34. Qf7+ Kh7 35. Kf1 $1 Qd5 36. Qg6+ Kg8 37. Ng4 Qg5 {Missed by Svidler, so he might have missed it in the earlier line as well.} 38. Qb6 ({Strong was} 38. Qe6+ Kh8 39. Ne5) 38... Qd5 39. Nxh6+ $5 ({Even better was to return to} 39. Qg6 Qg5 {and then} 40. Qe6+ Kh8 41. Ne5) 39... Kh7 40. Ng4 Rf8 41. Kg1 ({ There's no time for} 41. axb5 {as Black was threatening to draw with} Rxf3+ 42. gxf3 Qxf3+ 43. Nf2 Qg2+ 44. Ke2 Qf3+ 45. Kd2 Qxf2+ 46. Re2 Qd4+ 47. Ke1 Qg1+) 41... Qd4+ 42. Kh1 Bxf3 $1 {The best chance.} 43. gxf3 Rxf3 44. Qe6 Qd3 $6 ({ Georgiadis should have tried} 44... Rxh3+ 45. Kg2 Rh5 {when} 46. Qe4+ (46. Kg3 $5 {Svidler}) 46... Qxe4+ 47. Rxe4 Rd5 {is very close to a draw.}) 45. Ne3 $1 { Missed by Georgiadis.} bxa4 46. Kg2 Rf6 47. Qd5 {With the black pawns crumbled, White can easily go for the ending.} Qg6+ 48. Kh1 Rf2 49. Rg1 Qh6 50. Rg3 Qf6 51. Qd3+ Kh8 52. Ng4 Qc6+ 53. Kg1 Rxb2 54. Qd8+ Kh7 55. Qh4+ Kg8 56. Nh6+ { Black is getting mated.} 1-0 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.23"] [Round "2.1"] [White "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B07"] [WhiteElo "2779"] [BlackElo "2842"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "158"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Bf4 c6 5. Nf3 Bg7 6. Qd2 O-O 7. h3 ({Nothing much is} 7. Bh6 Bg4 8. Bxg7 Kxg7 9. Ng5 {½-½ Burdalev,K (2377)-Frolov,A (2406) Prague 2018}) 7... Qa5 8. e5 {A novelty, which does not provide White any advantage.} ({Instead, in an earlier game White opted for the sharp} 8. O-O-O b5 9. a3 b4 10. axb4 {Which also led to complex endgame after} Qa1+ 11. Nb1 Nxe4 12. Qe3 Nf6 13. Qa3 Qxa3 14. Nxa3 {in Yemelin,V (2522)-Utkin,A (2345) St Petersburg 2001}) 8... dxe5 9. dxe5 Nd5 10. Nxd5 Qxd2+ 11. Bxd2 cxd5 12. O-O-O {The opening part did not last long. Straight from the opening a complex endgame arose which probably made some of the chess fans unhappy. But since both players are amazing masters of that part of the game as well, the best is yet to come. [Peter Svidler noted that the endgame is not as comfortable for White as the typical French endgames from e.g. the Vacuum Cleaner variation because his pawn is not on f4 (yet). - PD]} Nc6 13. Bc3 e6 {Not worrying about the light-squared bishop. It will get its chance later.} ({Although} 13... Be6 14. Bb5 Rac8 {was also possible.}) 14. h4 {The position resembles the French defense, but with a strong black bishop on g7. Both players try to play on their flanks.} h6 15. Bd3 Bd7 16. Rhe1 Rfc8 17. Rd2 Rab8 18. Rde2 b5 19. Nd4 ({ If} 19. b3 Bf8) 19... b4 20. Nxc6 Bxc6 21. Bd4 Bb5 $1 {The chance for the bishop had come.} 22. Kd2 (22. Bxa7 $2 {loses material to} Bxd3 23. Bxb8 Bxe2) ({However} 22. Bxb5 Rxb5 23. h5 {looked OK for White.}) 22... h5 {"It's already slightly unpleasant." (MVL)} 23. f4 ({Here and on the next few moves Vachier-Lagrave avoids the capture of the a7 pawn. After} 23. Bxa7 Ra8 { Black will regain the pawn and take control of the open a-file:} 24. Bxb5 ({Or } 24. Bd4 Bxd3 25. Kxd3 Rxa2 26. b3) 24... Rxa7 {In both cases with some small advantage for the world champion.}) 23... Bf8 24. g4 $1 {Once more Vachier-Lagrave searches his chances on the kingside.} (24. Bxa7 Bxd3 (24... Ra8) 25. Kxd3 Ra8 {is again somewhat better for Black.}) 24... hxg4 25. Rg1 ( 25. h5 gxh5 26. Rh1 {"Somehow it felt a bit suspicious." (MVL)}) 25... Bc5 26. Bxc5 Rxc5 27. Rxg4 Kf8 28. Rh2 ({More precise in order to hold the balance was } 28. h5 Bxd3 29. Kxd3 gxh5 30. Rh4 Ke7 31. f5 exf5 32. Rxh5 {with likely draw. }) 28... Bxd3 29. Kxd3 {We are entering the most exciting part of the game, a four-rook complex endgame.} Rc4 $1 {This is the thing. The white rook is pinned and experiences difficulties in maneuvering. MVL had missed this.} 30. h5 gxh5 31. Rxh5 Ke7 32. Rgh4 {A second inaccuracy after which Carlsen completely takes over the initiative.} (32. Rh6 $1 {was strong with the idea to release the g4 rook and resume the kingside assault. For example} a5 33. Rf6 a4 34. Rg7 Rf8 35. f5 exf5 36. Rxf5 Re4 37. Rf6 Rxe5 38. Ra6 {when again the most likely outcome would be the draw.}) 32... Rg8 $1 {The white king is danger, so MVL needs to part with material.} 33. f5 $1 {In activity we trust! One cannot allow passive defense in the rook endgame.} Rg3+ 34. Kd2 Rg2+ 35. Kd1 (35. Ke3 exf5 36. Rxc4 dxc4 37. Rxf5 Rxc2 38. Kd4 b3 {is "resignable" according to MVL.}) 35... Rcxc2 36. f6+ Kd7 {Moving away from the danger zone.} (36... Ke8 37. Rxb4 {would have been easier to defend.}) 37. Rxb4 a5 ({Black has winning chances with all rooks on the board.} 37... Rxb2 $2 {would lead to a position where it is even White to fights for the win after} 38. Rxb2 Rxb2 39. Rh7 Ke8 40. Rh8+ Kd7 41. Rf8) 38. Rb8 $1 {Vachier-Lagrave activated his rooks in return and is ready for a perpetual.} Rcf2 39. Ke1 Kc6 $1 {The king takes care of himself.} ({After} 39... d4 40. Rhh8 d3 {White starts the perpetuum mobile} 41. Rhd8+ Kc6 42. Rbc8+ {with a draw as the king has nowhere to hide.}) 40. Rc8+ ({Here} 40. Rhh8 {just pushes the black king towards the white pawns (or the white king).} Kc5) 40... Kb5 41. Rh7 d4 {With the cruel intention to turn this pawn into a queen by force. This requires desperate measures by the French GM.} 42. Rg8 $1 Re2+ ({Once more} 42... Rxg8 $2 43. Kxf2 {is plain wrong for Black.}) 43. Kf1 ({Similar was} 43. Kd1 Rgf2) 43... Rgf2+ 44. Kg1 Rf4 ({A quicker win was} 44... Rc2 45. Rxf7 Rfe2 46. Kh1 d3 47. Rd7 d2 48. f7 Re1+ 49. Rg1 Rcc1 {(MVL)}) 45. Rxf7 Rxe5 {More and more pawns leave the stage. But this does not relief White's problems. His king is weak, constantly in danger of getting mated, the d-pawn is a monster and the black rooks are doing whatever they want.} 46. Rc7 {Trying an attack again.} ({Here's an eternal mating threat:} 46. Rd8 $4 Rg5+ 47. Kh2 Rh4#) ({MVL would be happy to get rid of the d-passer at once. However, after} 46. Rd7 {some neat intermediate moves allow Carlsen a chance to win a pawn with} Kc6 $1 47. Rxd4 ( 47. Rgd8 $4 Rg5+) 47... Rxd4 48. f7 Rf5 49. f8=Q Rd1+ $1 ({Not the immediate} 49... Rxf8 50. Rxf8) 50. Kg2 Rd2+ 51. Kg3 Rxf8 52. Rxf8 Rxb2 {when Black should be able to convert.}) 46... Rxf6 ({MVL mentioned} 46... d3 {here.}) 47. Rb8+ Ka6 ({The black should be careful too} 47... Ka4 $4 48. Rc4#) 48. Rc6+ Ka7 49. Rg8 Rf7 $1 {Saveguarding the king. There is also a threat-put the rook behind the d-pawn and push it.} 50. Rg6 ({After} 50. Rd6 Re1+ 51. Kg2 e5 { the pawn duo should win.}) 50... Re1+ {Chasing the king to a dangerous position.} 51. Kg2 d3 52. Rd6 Re2+ 53. Kh3 d2 ({Also interesting was} 53... Re3+ 54. Rg3 (54. Kg4 e5 {intending Rf7-f4-d4}) 54... Rh7+ 55. Kg2 Re2+ 56. Kg1 d2 57. Rgd3 Rc7 58. Rxd2 Rc1+ 59. Rd1 Rxd1+ 60. Rxd1 Rxb2 {but these makes White's life is easier and} 61. a3 {might well be a draw.}) 54. Rg8 Kb7 $1 { “At this point I was about to give up but then I saw there were some chances. Not even some chances, probably major chances." (Carlsen)} 55. Rgd8 {Finally the d-pawn leaves the board. Two more left and the draw will be there.} (55. b3 Kc7) 55... d1=Q (55... Rff2 $2 {allows perpetual} 56. R8d7+) 56. Rxd1 Rxb2 57. Re1 {Trying to reduce the material to the max.} ({Perhaps White should have at least for once tried to defend passively with} 57. R1d2 Rxd2 58. Rxd2 Kc6 { Would he hold, is another question.}) 57... Rf6 58. Rd6 Rxa2 59. Kg3 ({Instead } 59. Rdxe6 Rxe6 60. Rxe6 Rb2 {is a tablebase win for Black.}) ({However} 59. Rb1+ Kc7 60. Ra6 {would have kept reasonable drawing chances for White.}) 59... Rb2 60. Re5 Rb3+ $1 {One more of those little nasty checks that somehow miraculously turn White's position into a hopeless one. No sourcery here; the king is simply pushed backwards.} (60... a4 $5) 61. Kg2 ({If} 61. Kg4 Rg6+ 62. Kh5 Rg8 63. Rg5 Rh3+ {forces a win after} 64. Kg4 Rxg5+ 65. Kxg5 a4) 61... a4 62. Ra5 a3 {And since the white king is on the second rank, Carlsen will manage to push the a-passer far enough.} 63. Rda6 Rff3 64. Ra7+ ({After} 64. Rxe6 {Black wins with} Rfc3 65. Re2 Kc6 {followed by Rb3-b2.}) 64... Kc6 65. R7a6+ Kd7 {One more king dance.} 66. Ra7+ Kd6 67. R7a6+ Ke7 68. Re5 Rfc3 $1 { A beautiful final touch of a brilliant game.} (68... Rf6 69. Re2 {is less convincing.}) 69. Rexe6+ Kd7 70. Kf2 ({Nothing helps, although Black still has to be very careful:} 70. Re2 Kc7 ({But not} 70... Rb2 $2 71. Rxb2 axb2 72. Rb6) 71. Re7+ ({If} 71. Ra4 Rc6 ({But not} 71... Rb2 $2 72. Rxb2 axb2 73. Rb4) 72. Rf2 Kb7 73. Rf7+ Kb6 74. Ra8 Rc2+ 75. Rf2 Kb7 76. Ra4 Rcb2 $1 ({Once again avoiding a reef} 76... Rxf2+ 77. Kxf2 Rb2+ 78. Ke3 a2 79. Kd3 {with a draw.}) 77. Kf1 Kb6 78. Rf6+ Kb5 79. Ra8 (79. Rfa6 Ra2 $1) 79... Rc3 $1 {and wins.}) 71... Kb8 72. Re2 Rc7 $1) 70... Rb2+ 71. Re2 Rh3 $1 ({Very nice, even though} 71... Kc7 $1 {would have also won.}) 72. Kg2 ({Since} 72. Rxb2 axb2 73. Rb6 { loses to the tactical shot} Rh1 $1 74. Rxb2 Rh2+) 72... Rxe2+ 73. Kxh3 a2 74. Kg3 Kc7 {The king's last dance. Triumphal.} 75. Kf3 Kb7 76. Ra4 Rh2 77. Ke3 Kb6 78. Kd3 Kb5 79. Ra8 Kb4 (79... Kb4 {White resigned as the king will support the passer after} 80. Rb8+ Ka3 81. Ra8+ Kb2 82. Rb8+ Kc1 83. Ra8 Kb1 84. Rb8+ Rb2 {All the black pieces did a tremendous job. Rubinstein would have enjoyed the spectacle!}) 0-1 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.24"] [Round "3.1"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Svidler, Peter"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B94"] [WhiteElo "2842"] [BlackElo "2753"] [PlyCount "52"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 Nbd7 ({For reference on White's 15th move, here's Dubov-Artemiev, Tbilisi 2017:} 6... e6 7. f4 h6 8. Bh4 Be7 9. Qf3 Nbd7 10. O-O-O g5 11. fxg5 hxg5 12. Bg3 Qc7 { and now the same idea} 13. Bb5 $5 {and White won in 41 moves.}) 7. Qe2 ({ Another important move is} 7. Bc4 {e.g.} h6 8. Bh4 g6 9. Qe2 Bg7 10. O-O-O O-O 11. Bb3 Qc7 12. Kb1 Rb8 13. f4 e5 14. fxe5 dxe5 15. Nf3 b5 {Nepomniachtchi,I (2751)-Korobov,A (2678) Poikovsky 2018}) 7... h6 8. Bh4 g6 9. f4 Qc7 ({In his 2015 Najdorf book, Parimarjan Negi had} 9... e5 10. fxe5 dxe5 11. O-O-O Qc7 12. Nb3 {as his main line. It still is, and Svidler knew that, but since Carlsen was playing quite fast, he felt it was time to deviate.}) 10. O-O-O {Around here Svidler started to regret including ...h6, Bh4.} Bg7 11. g4 (11. Kb1 O-O 12. Nf3 e5 13. f5 b5 14. g4 b4 15. Nd5 Nxd5 16. exd5 a5 {Melia,S (2400) -Travkina,A (2287) Riga 2017}) 11... e5 12. fxe5 ({Svidler mentioned} 12. Ndb5 axb5 13. Nxb5 Qc6 (13... Qa5 14. Nxd6+ Kf8 {is the actual refutation}) 14. Rxd6 Qxe4 {and here, listening to these moves blindfold, Carlsen after just a few seconds came up with with the beautiful} 15. Re6+ $1 Kf8 (15... fxe6 16. Nd6+) 16. Re8+ $3 {and White wins.}) 12... Nxe5 13. h3 (13. Nf5 $5) 13... Be6 14. Qf2 Nfd7 15. Bb5 $5 {A move that reminds of the Gothenburg variation, but also, as Anish Giri pointed out, Dubov-Artemiev, Tbilisi 2017! In this case the move is purely positional.} O-O ({Of course not} 15... axb5 16. Nxe6 fxe6 17. Nxb5 { and Black can resign.}) 16. Bxd7 Qxd7 ({Svidler didn't like} 16... Nxd7 17. Be7 Rfc8 18. Nxe6 fxe6 19. Bxd6 Qa5 20. Rhf1 Kh8) 17. Nf5 $5 gxf5 18. gxf5 Kh7 ({ After} 18... Bc4 19. f6 Bh8 20. Qf4 Ng6 21. Qxh6 Qe6 22. Rhg1 Bxf6 23. Bxf6 Qxf6 24. h4 Qg7 25. Qg5 Qe5 26. h5 {was Carlsen's intention. He called it "horrible" for Black.}) 19. Rhg1 Bh8 (19... Rg8 20. Rxg7+ $1 Rxg7 21. Bf6 { is promising for White.}) 20. Bg3 ({Carlsen spent most of his time on a third piece sac:} 20. Bg5 $5 hxg5 (20... Bg7 21. f6 $1) 21. Rxg5 Ng6 22. fxg6+ fxg6 23. Qh4+ Kg7 24. Rdg1 {but after} Qf7 $1 (24... Rf6 $2 25. Rh5 Rf1+ 26. Kd2 $1) 25. Qh5 Qf4+ 26. Kb1 Kf7 27. Rxg6 Ke7 {the king runs and now, in order for White not to lose, he needs to play} 28. Rxe6+ Kxe6 29. Qd5+ Ke7 30. Qxb7+ Ke6 31. Qd5+) ({The players didn't see it immediately for White after} 20. Bg5 hxg5 21. Rxg5 Ng6 22. Rdg1 Bg7 {but the computer goes} ({The best chance is probably } 22... Rac8) 23. Rh5+ Kg8 24. f6 $1 Qd8 25. fxg7 Kxg7 26. Qd4+ f6 27. Rhg5 Bf7 28. h4 {and Black won't survive this.}) 20... Rac8 21. Bf4 Qe7 22. fxe6 fxe6 23. Qg3 Rg8 24. Qf2 Rgf8 25. Qg3 Rg8 26. Qf2 Rgf8 ({Svidler wasn't sure about} 26... Nc4 27. Rxg8 Rxg8 28. Qe2 {when} b5 29. Qd3 Be5 $5 30. Bxe5 Qg5+ 31. Kb1 Qxe5 32. a4 $5 {is probably equal.}) 1/2-1/2 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.24"] [Round "3.3"] [White "Georgiadis, Nico"] [Black "Navara, David"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E62"] [WhiteElo "2526"] [BlackElo "2741"] [PlyCount "78"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. Nc3 d6 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. O-O e5 8. dxe5 dxe5 9. Bg5 Be6 10. Qa4 Qc8 (10... h6 11. Rad1 Qe7 12. Nd5 Bxd5 13. Bxf6 Bxf6 14. cxd5 Nd4 15. e4 Nxf3+ 16. Bxf3 Rfd8 {Edouard,R (2628)-Bacrot,E (2692) Cap d'Agde 2016}) 11. Rfd1 Nd7 12. Nd5 e4 13. Ne1 Nb6 14. Qb3 (14. Qc2 f5 15. Rd2 Kh8 16. Rad1 Ne5 17. b3 c6 18. Nf4 Bg8 19. Be7 Re8 20. Bc5 Qc7 21. Qc1 Qf7 { Akopian,V (2615)-Nijboer,F (2505) Wijk aan Zee 1993}) 14... Bxd5 15. cxd5 Nd4 16. Qe3 Nc4 17. Qxe4 Re8 18. Rxd4 ({Georgiadis didn't like} 18. Qh4 Nxe2+ 19. Kf1 Nxb2 ({but Navara was planning} 19... Nd6 {when} 20. Be3 {is actually quite playable for White.})) 18... Rxe4 19. Rxe4 Nd6 $1 {Now Black is much better but it's not easy to convert the advantage.} ({Georgiadis had expected} 19... Nxb2 20. Rc1 {with good compensation.}) 20. Re3 Bxb2 21. Rd1 a5 { Georgiadis had missed this plan of running with the a-pawn.} 22. Rb3 (22. Re7 Qd8 $1) 22... Bg7 23. Bf4 b5 24. Rc1 Qd7 25. Nd3 b4 26. e4 Nb5 27. e5 (27. Ne5 Qe8 28. Nc6 Nc3 $1) 27... Rd8 {Navara forgot that his a-pawn will be hanging... } (27... Re8 28. d6 Nc3) 28. Nc5 Qe8 $6 ({Black should play} 28... Qf5 {when} 29. Nb7 Re8 30. Nxa5 {can be answered by} Nd4 $1 31. Rb2 g5) 29. Nb7 Rb8 30. d6 $5 {With three minutes on the clock Georgiadis decided to go for complications. } (30. Nxa5 {would have been quite OK for White.}) 30... cxd6 31. Bc6 Qe6 32. exd6 $2 {But this is clearly wrong.} (32. Bxb5 Rxb7 33. Bc4 Qf5 (33... d5 34. Bxd5 $1) 34. exd6 Bf6 35. Rd3 {would have been unclear.}) 32... Nc3 33. Rb2 g5 34. Be3 (34. Bxg5 Nxa2) 34... Nxa2 35. Rxa2 Qxa2 36. d7 Bf6 37. Ba7 Rf8 38. Re1 Qd2 39. Kf1 b3 0-1 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.24"] [Round "3.2"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A04"] [WhiteElo "2801"] [BlackElo "2779"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "63"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 e5 4. e3 Nf6 5. d4 e4 6. Ne5 ({Earlier this year the French GM held the world champion after} 6. d5 exf3 7. dxc6 fxg2 8. cxd7+ Bxd7 9. Bxg2 g6 10. b3 Bg7 11. Qd6 Qb6 12. Qxb6 axb6 13. Bb2 Bc6 14. O-O Ke7 15. Nd5+ Bxd5 16. cxd5 Rhg8 {Carlsen,M (2843)-Vachier Lagrave,M (2789), Grenke/ Baden-Baden 2018 which I annotated as well.}) 6... g6 7. g4 {Vachier-Lagrave remembered that he had looked at this move in the past and thought that leads to rich play, but could not remember much of his analyzes during the game.} h6 8. Bg2 Bg7 9. h3 $1 {The novelty. The idea is to keep all the options open. It certainly poses a ton of practical problems for both the players.} (9. h4 cxd4 10. exd4 d5 11. g5 hxg5 12. hxg5 Rxh1+ 13. Bxh1 Nh5 14. cxd5 Nxe5 15. dxe5 Bxe5 16. Qa4+ Kf8 17. Qxe4 Qe7 {was the sharp course of the game Movsesian,S (2699) -Ponomariov,R (2743) Khanty-Mansiysk 2013}) 9... Qe7 (9... O-O) 10. b3 $1 cxd4 ({Mamedyarov revealed one of his key ideas in the post mortem. If} 10... Nb4 11. a3 Na6 {with the strong threat d7-d6 White prepared the fantastic:} 12. O-O d6 13. f4 $1 O-O 14. Ra2 $1 {Followed by Ra2-f2 with an attack for the piece. "Computer says 0.00 but I like it."}) ({The capture of the central pawn} 10... Nxe5 11. dxe5 Qxe5 12. Bb2 O-O 13. Rb1 Qe7 14. h4 {leads to bad position according to Mamedyarov.}) ({Vachier-Lagrave did not consider} 10... d6 { seriously as it loses a tempo. White is better after} 11. Nxc6 bxc6 12. Qc2 ({ Or} 12. O-O)) (10... Nd8 11. O-O d6 12. f4 {would be similar as the last line.} ) 11. exd4 Nxe5 12. dxe5 Qxe5 13. Bb2 d5 ({On} 13... O-O {Black did not like} 14. Qd2 {For example} Re8 ({And} 14... e3 15. Qxe3 Qxe3+ 16. fxe3 {leads to clear edge for White in the endgame.}) 15. Nd5 {when the queen sacrifice is forced} Qxb2 16. Qxb2 Nxd5 17. Qc1 Bxa1 18. Qxa1 Nf4 19. O-O {but not as sound as Carlsen's sacrifice against Navara.}) 14. Qe2 $1 {MVL had missed this.} (14. Qd2 {can be met with} dxc4 15. Nxe4 Qe6 16. O-O Nxe4 17. Bxe4 O-O) 14... Qe7 ({ After} 14... d4 15. Nb5 (15. Nxe4 {(Mamedyarov) is also good as the d4 pawn will soon disappear from the board.}) 15... O-O 16. Bxd4 Qf4 17. Qe3 {(MVL) Black is in very bad shape.}) ({Here} 14... dxc4 $2 {drops a piece due to the pin} 15. Nxe4 Qe6 16. Nxf6+) 15. cxd5 O-O 16. O-O {Simple and good. The e4-pawn went too far and White will win it in the coming moves.} ({Mamedyarov also considered the long castle-} 16. O-O-O Qd6 (16... Bd7)) 16... Re8 ({ After the game Vachier-Lagrave regretted that he did not follow his original intention:} 16... b6 17. Nxe4 Nxe4 18. Bxg7 Kxg7 19. Qxe4 Qxe4 20. Bxe4 Bb7 { with chances to defend despite the pawn deficit.}) (16... b6 17. Rad1 $5 { (MVL) intending d5-d6 is also strong for White.}) 17. Rfe1 Bd7 ({This was the last chance for} 17... b6 {when the forced line leads to a rook endgame:} 18. Nxe4 Nxe4 19. Bxg7 Kxg7 20. Qxe4 Qxe4 21. Rxe4 Bb7 (21... Rxe4 22. Bxe4 Bb7 23. Rc1 Rd8 24. Rc7 Bxd5 25. Bxd5 Rxd5 26. Rxa7 {which players were inclined to consider more lost than draw for Black.}) 22. Rd4) 18. Nxe4 Nxe4 19. Bxg7 Kxg7 20. Qxe4 Qxe4 ({Black could not find way to improve his pieces after} 20... Qf6 21. Qf3) 21. Bxe4 h5 {"A terrible move, based on oversight" (MVL)} ({Black should have defended with} 21... b6 22. d6 Rac8 23. Bb7 Rcd8 ({Or} 23... Rc2 24. Rxe8 Bxe8 25. Rd1 Bd7 26. a4 Rc3 27. Bd5 Kf8) 24. Rxe8 Bxe8 25. Re1 { although the French GM was not optimistic about his chances here neither.}) 22. gxh5 gxh5 ({Only here did Black realize that his active idea} 22... Re5 23. hxg6 Rg5+ 24. Kh2 Bxh3 {will be refuted with the zwischenzug} 25. f4 $1 { For example} (25. Kxh3 $4 Rh8#) 25... Rh5 26. Kg3 fxg6 27. Bf3 {and White wins. }) 23. h4 $1 {Fixes the pawn on a light square. The rest was easy for Mamedyarov.} Rac8 24. Bf3 Rxe1+ 25. Rxe1 Kf6 ({The passive defense will not help-} 25... Kg6 26. Kh2 {followed by Kh2-g3-h4 and then say Re1-g1-g5 would be soon over.}) 26. d6 ({Not the immediate} 26. Bxh5 Rh8) 26... b6 27. Re7 Rd8 28. Bxh5 Be6 29. Rxa7 Rxd6 30. Kg2 Rd8 31. Bf3 Ke5 32. Ra4 1-0 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.25"] [Round "4.1"] [White "Georgiadis, Nico"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C17"] [WhiteElo "2526"] [BlackElo "2842"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "116"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. e4 e6 {Carlsen noticed that Georgiadis does not have any games in a particular line of the French defense and decided to test his opening knowledge there.} 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 c5 5. a3 Ba5 6. b4 cxd4 7. Qg4 Kf8 8. Nb5 Bc7 {"A bluff." (Carlsen)} ({Instead} 8... Bb6 {"I know this is the strongest move." (Georgiadis)} 9. Nf3 Nc6 10. Bb2 Nge7 11. Bd3 Ng6 12. Qg3 f6 13. Bxg6 hxg6 14. Nbxd4 Nxd4 15. Bxd4 Kf7 {as in Inarkiev,E (2683)-Vallejo Pons,F (2705) Sochi 2017}) 9. Qxd4 ({The world champion knew a recent blitz game of Mamedyarov which went} 9. Qg3 Nc6 10. f4 a6 11. Nxc7 Qxc7 12. Bb2 Nge7 13. Bd3 Nf5 14. Qf2 {and apparently prepared something there, Fedoseev,V (2724) -Mamedyarov,S (2809) Moscow 2018}) 9... Nc6 10. Qc5+ Nge7 11. Nxc7 Qxc7 12. Nf3 b6 13. Qd6 $5 {The bluff did not work well. It is even Georgadis who comes up with an interesting over-the-board novelty.} ({It is interesting that players knew that the correct continuation is:} 13. Qc3 {"with advantage for White" (Carlsen)} a6 14. Bd3 Bb7 15. Bf4 (15. O-O) 15... Rc8 16. O-O h6 17. Rfe1 { Van Haastert,E (2440)-Berelowitsch,A (2549) Belgium 2014}) 13... Qxd6 14. exd6 Nf5 {The pawn is seemingly doomed, but White has foreseen this.} 15. Bf4 f6 16. g4 Nfd4 17. Nxd4 Nxd4 18. O-O-O e5 19. Rxd4 {All of this has been calculated by the young Swiss GM when he opted for the novelty. In return for the exchange he gets the bishop pair, a strong passer and piece activity. The rook on h8 looks particularly ugly.} ({However, it made sense to postpone the capture for a move and use Carlsen's suggestion} 19. h3 $1 {which saves the important pawn. After} Bb7 20. Rxd4 exd4 {White has full compensation for the exchange in many ways:} 21. Bb5 (21. Bg2 $5) (21. h4 $5) 21... a6 22. Bd7 Rd8 23. Be6 {with an interesting endgame ahead.}) 19... exd4 20. Bb5 Bxg4 ({ Carlsen did not consider seriously the cementing move} 20... Be6 {as after} 21. Rd1 {followed by Rd1xd4 "White does not risk to lose."} ({White can also save the g4 pawn, but not with} 21. h3 $6 g5 $1 22. Bg3 h5) ({Better is to save it with} 21. g5 $5)) 21. Re1 g5 {Opening some room for the pieces with tempo.} 22. Bg3 Rd8 {Missed by White.} ({Georgiadis was hoping for} 22... h5 23. d7 Kf7 24. Re8 ({Weaker is} 24. Bc7 Be6) 24... Raxe8 25. dxe8=Q+ Rxe8 26. Bxe8+ Kxe8 { with a draw in the opposite-colored bishop endgame.}) 23. Re7 h5 (23... Rg8 { leads Black nowhere after} 24. Rxh7 Rg7 25. Rh8+ Rg8 26. Rh7) 24. h4 gxh4 25. Bf4 ({The other way to defend was} 25. Bxh4 Rxd6 26. Rxa7 {but then White parts with his main asset.}) 25... Bf5 {Brining the kingside rook out.} ({ Carlsen did not like this move and suggested instead} 25... a5 $5 {to clear he seventh rank out of his pawns, thus not allowing White too many passers. The arising lines are extremely interesting. Most logical seems to bring the king out:} 26. Kd2 {when after the sequence} ({not} 26. Bd3 Rd7) 26... Bf5 27. bxa5 bxa5 28. Bd3 Bxd3 29. Kxd3 Re8 30. Rb7 h3 {both sides have dangerous passers. Play may continue:} 31. Kxd4 $1 Re4+ 32. Kc5 $3 ({But not} 32. Kxd5 {when Black has a study-like win:} Rxf4 33. d7 ({If} 33. Rb8+ Kg7 34. Rxh8 Rf5+ $1 { The neatest solution.} (34... h2 $1 35. Rxh5 Rf5+ {would also do.}) 35. Kd4 h2 36. d7 h1=Q 37. d8=Q Qd1+ 38. Kc3 Rc5+ {and mate comes soon.}) 33... Ke7 34. d8=Q+ Kxd8 35. Rb8+ Kd7 36. Rxh8 Rf5+ $1 37. Ke4 h2 {and the pawn queens.}) 32... Rxf4 ({Objectively best is:} 32... Rc4+ 33. Kb5 Rxf4 34. Rb8+ Kf7 35. Rxh8 Ke6 36. Rxh5 Rxf2 37. Rxh3 Kxd6 {when Black preserves winning chances.}) 33. Rb8+ Kf7 ({Here} 33... Kg7 $2 34. Rxh8 Rc4+ 35. Kxd5 Rxc2 36. Rxh5 { is awkward for Black.}) 34. Rxh8 Rc4+ 35. Kxd5 Rxc2 36. d7 h2 {and it all ends peacefully after} 37. Rxh5 Rxf2 38. Rh7+ Kg6 39. Rh8 Rd2+ 40. Kc6 Rc2+) 26. Rxa7 Rh7 ({The computer suggestion} 26... Rc8 27. a4 Rxc2+ 28. Kd1 {makes little sense for a human being. The d6 passer is left almost on its own. Is the pawn on c2 worth the journey?}) 27. Rc7 Bd7 {A critical moment of the game. Although Georgiadis was in time-trouble already and Carlsen had more than an hour on his clock, it is the world champion who misses an important detail.} ({ From afar Black calculated} 27... Rxc7 28. dxc7 Ra8 29. a4 Ke7 30. Bc6 Rh8 { (rook anywhere)} 31. a5 ({Carlsen's intuition did not fail him. White indeed wins here with the precise:} 31. b5 $1 {when} Bd7 {is met with} 32. Bxd5) 31... bxa5 32. bxa5 {and thought he should be winning with} ({Then it dawned to him that} 32. b5 $1 {is in fact better and he might even lose the game. It might however be still a draw after} Bd7 33. Bb7 Bxb5 34. c8=Q Rxc8 35. Bxc8 d3 { as there are almost no white pawns left alive.}) 32... Bc8) ({On} 27... h3 28. Kd2 {should not change much.}) ({The big question is if Black was winning after:} 27... Kg8 {which intends Rh7-g7. A possible line is:} 28. Bc6 Rg7 29. a4 ({But not the other way round} 29. Bxd5+ Kh8 30. a4 $4 Rxc7 31. dxc7 Rxd5) 29... Rg1+ 30. Kd2 Kh8 31. Bxd5 Ra1 32. Re7 {Prepared Bf4-h6.} (32. Bh6 Rxd6) 32... Rxa4 33. Bh6 h3 34. Bg7+ Kh7 35. Bxf6+ Kg6 36. Be5 Rc8 37. Bb3 Rxb4 38. Rg7+ Kh6 39. Rf7 {Nothing is clear here neither, but the unsafe position of the black king and the limited material on the board should be objectively enough for the first player to survive.}) 28. Bc6 $1 {This is what Carlsen missed.} h3 ({It is too late to revert to the previous line} 28... Bf5 29. a4) 29. Kd2 (29. a4 Rg7 30. Bh6 Bxc6 31. Rxg7 {should also suffice for a draw.}) 29... Rg7 {Forcing matters.} ({After} 29... h2 30. Bxh2 Rg7 31. Bxd5 {the bishops are at least not worse than the rooks.}) 30. Bh6 Bxc6 31. Rxg7 Rxd6 32. Rg5+ $1 {Another neat move by the Swiss GM.} ({Black was hoping to push after} 32. Rg3+ Kf7 33. Rxh3 Kg6 34. Bf4 Re6 {It is the more or less the same position as the game except that the h5 pawn is still alive. And} 35. Kd3 $2 { is not good to} Bb5+ 36. Kxd4 Re4+ {(Carlsen)}) 32... Kf7 33. Rxh5 Bb5 ({ Black cannot keep the h3 passer alive-} 33... Bd7 34. Bf4 Rc6 35. Rh7+ Ke8 36. Rh8+ Ke7 37. Rh7+ Kd8 38. Rh8+) 34. Rxh3 Re6 35. Rf3 {The opposite-colored bishops determine the draw outcome, but Carlsen keeps on trying to squeeze water from stone.} Kg6 36. Bf4 Rc6 37. Bg3 Rc4 38. Rd3 Kf5 39. Rf3+ Ke6 40. Rd3 f5 41. f3 f4 ({Or} 41... Ba4 42. c3) 42. Bf2 Ke5 43. c3 {One more pair of pawns is traded as well as the rooks. Many people would have accepted the draw now, but the world champion found one more resource.} Rc6 $1 44. Rxd4 Rh6 45. Kc1 ({There was another way to the peace:} 45. c4 Bxc4 46. Rxf4 Rh2 47. Ke3 Rxf2 48. Rxc4 Rxf3+ 49. Kxf3 dxc4 50. a4 {(Carlsen) For instance:} Kd4 51. Ke2 c3 52. a5 bxa5 53. bxa5 Kc5 54. a6 Kb6 55. Kd3) 45... Rh3 46. Rd2 Rxf3 47. Bd4+ Ke4 48. Kb2 Rd3 49. Rxd3 Kxd3 50. Bxb6 Ba4 ({Unfortunately for Black, he cannot win the bishop and save his last pawn from the trade at the same time. For example:} 50... Ke2 51. Kb3 f3 52. a4 Bc4+ 53. Kc2 f2 54. Bxf2 Kxf2 55. b5 Ke3 56. b6 Ba6 57. Kb3 ({But not} 57. c4 d4 $1) 57... Ke4 58. Kb4 Kd3 59. Kc5 ( {Or} 59. a5 Kd2 60. Kc5 Kxc3 61. Kxd5) 59... Bb7 60. a5 Kxc3 61. a6 ({The pawn endgame is also a draw:} 61. Kb5 d4 62. a6 Bxa6+ 63. Kxa6 d3 64. b7 d2 65. b8=Q d1=Q) 61... Bxa6 62. Kxd5) 51. Ba7 f3 52. Bg1 Kd2 ({If} 52... Ke2 53. c4 dxc4 54. Kc3 Bb5 55. a4) 53. Ba7 $1 ({"The only thing White should avoid is"} 53. Bd4 Ke2 54. c4 Kd3 $1 {(Carlsen) although even this is a draw after} 55. Bf2 dxc4 56. Kc1 Ke2 57. Bg1 f2 58. Bxf2 Kxf2 59. Kd2) 53... Bd1 54. Bc5 Ba4 55. Ba7 Ke2 56. c4 d4 57. Bxd4 Kd3 58. Ba7 Kxc4 1/2-1/2 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.25"] [Round "4.2"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Svidler, Peter"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E60"] [WhiteElo "2801"] [BlackElo "2753"] [PlyCount "82"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 c6 4. Bg2 d5 5. Qa4 dxc4 6. Qxc4 Be6 7. Qa4 Bg7 8. Nf3 O-O 9. O-O Nbd7 10. Nc3 Nd5 (10... Nb6 11. Qc2 Bc4 12. Rd1 Nfd5 13. e4 Nxc3 14. bxc3 Qc8 15. a4 h6 {Dreev,A (2653)-Izzat,K (2484) chess.com INT 2018}) 11. Rd1 N7f6 (11... Nxc3 12. bxc3 Bd5 13. Qc2 Nf6 14. Ba3 Qc7 {Ushenina,A (2443) -Bodnaruk,A (2446) Sochi 2018}) 12. h3 $6 Qb6 $6 {The only move Svidler played without thinking but he misses a tactic which Mamedyarov noticed right after playing h3.} ({After} 12... Qc8 $1 {White has to play} 13. Nxd5 (13. Kh2 Nxc3 14. bxc3 Ne4 {is the tactic; both f2 and c3 are hanging.}) (13. g4 h5) 13... Bxd5 {and Black has equalized.}) 13. Ne1 Rfd8 (13... Nxc3 $5 14. bxc3 Bd5) 14. e4 Nxc3 15. bxc3 Qb5 16. Qxb5 (16. Qc2 $5) 16... cxb5 17. Ba3 Bf8 18. d5 Bc8 19. Rac1 (19. e5 Nd7 20. f4 Nb6 21. Bc5 {King} Na4 22. Bd4 b6 {Svidler}) (19. Nc2 e5 $1 {and Black is fine.} (19... Nd7 20. Nd4 a6 21. Ne6 {Mamedyarov})) 19... e6 20. d6 e5 21. Nd3 (21. f4 Be6 22. Nf3 Nd7 $1) 21... Ne8 22. Nxe5 Be6 23. Rd2 Bxd6 24. Rcd1 Bc7 25. Nd7 Nd6 26. Nf6+ Kg7 27. Nd5 Bxd5 28. Rxd5 Nc4 29. Bc5 a6 30. f4 Rxd5 31. Rxd5 Bb6 32. e5 ({Svidler was very much worried about} 32. Bd4+ Bxd4+ 33. cxd4 {but Mamedyarov pointed out} Rc8 34. Rd7 Nb6 35. Rxb7 Rc1+ {and Black might just survive, e.g.} 36. Kh2 Nc4 37. e5 Rc2 38. e6 Ne3 39. e7 Rxg2+ 40. Kh1 Re2) 32... Rc8 33. Bxb6 Nxb6 34. Rd6 Na4 35. Bxb7 Rxc3 36. Bxa6 Rxg3+ 37. Kh2 Ra3 38. Bxb5 Rxa2+ 39. Kg3 Nc5 40. Rd4 Ra3+ 41. Kg2 Ne6 1/2-1/2 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.25"] [Round "4.3"] [White "Navara, David"] [Black "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D85"] [WhiteElo "2741"] [BlackElo "2779"] [PlyCount "56"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Nxc3 7. bxc3 c5 8. Be3 Qa5 9. Nd2 (9. Qd2 O-O 10. Rc1 Rd8 11. d5 e6 12. Bg5 f6 13. Be3 Nc6 { Yu,Y (2759)-Svidler,P (2753) Shenzhen 2018}) 9... Bd7 10. Rb1 Ba4 11. Qxa4+ Qxa4 12. Bb5+ Qxb5 13. Rxb5 b6 14. dxc5 {MVL said he "forgot this is better for White."} Nd7 (14... Bxc3 15. Ke2 Bxd2 16. Kxd2 Nd7 17. c6 Nf8 {Melkumyan,H (2620)-Khalifman,A (2632) Moscow 2012}) 15. Ke2 Bxc3 {Navara thought for 43 minutes here because there's a big choice to make.} 16. Nb3 (16. c6 $1 { was probably best:} Nf8 (16... Nf6 17. Nc4 O-O-O 18. f3) 17. Nf3 $5) (16. Rc1 $5) 16... O-O 17. c6 (17. Rc1 $5) 17... Nf6 18. Kd3 Bb2 19. Nd2 Rfd8+ 20. Kc4 Ba3 21. e5 Rac8 (21... Ng4 $5) 22. exf6 Rxc6+ 23. Kb3 Rd3+ 24. Ka4 Bd6 25. Rb3 Rd5 26. Rb5 Rd3 27. Rb3 Rd5 28. Rb5 Rd3 1/2-1/2 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.26"] [Round "5.1"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C77"] [WhiteElo "2842"] [BlackElo "2801"] [PlyCount "133"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. d3 b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 7. c3 d6 8. Bg5 ( 8. Nbd2 O-O 9. Nf1 d5 10. exd5 Nxd5 11. Ng3 f6 12. O-O Be6 {Caruana,F (2799) -So,W (2788) London 2017}) 8... h6 9. Bh4 O-O 10. Nbd2 Be6 11. O-O Bb6 12. Re1 Bxb3 (12... Kh7 13. Bc2 Ne7 14. d4 Ng6 15. Bg3 Re8 16. Nf1 Nh5 {Grischuk,A (2761)-Mamedyarov,S (2800) Paris 2017}) 13. Nxb3 Nb8 14. d4 Nbd7 15. a4 Re8 16. Qc2 Qe7 17. h3 Rab8 18. axb5 axb5 19. Na5 Bxa5 20. Rxa5 c6 21. Ra7 Qe6 22. Rd1 Nf8 ({Not} 22... Ra8 $6 23. d5 cxd5 24. exd5 Nxd5 25. Rxd7 Qxd7 26. Rxd5) 23. Rc7 Rec8 24. Rxc6 Rxc6 25. d5 Qc8 26. dxc6 Ne8 $1 (26... Qxc6 $2 27. Bxf6 gxf6 28. Nh4 {is horrible for Black.}) 27. Be7 $5 Qxc6 28. Nh4 Ng6 29. Nf5 Rb7 30. Bxd6 Rd7 31. Ba3 Rxd1+ 32. Qxd1 Qxe4 33. Ne3 Nf6 34. g3 h5 35. h4 Qc6 36. Bb4 Kh7 37. b3 Qa8 38. c4 bxc4 39. bxc4 Qc6 40. Bd6 Kg8 41. c5 Qe4 42. Qf1 ({ Interesting, and perhaps the last chance for something tangible, was} 42. Be7 $5 Nxe7 43. Qd8+ Kh7 44. Qxe7 Kg6 45. Qd6) 42... Nd5 43. Nxd5 Qxd5 44. Qc1 f6 45. Qc2 e4 46. Kf1 Kf7 47. Qa4 Qd3+ 48. Kg1 Kg8 49. Qa2+ Kh7 50. Kh2 Qd1 51. Qa3 Qd2 52. Qe3 Qd5 53. Qc1 Kg8 54. Kg1 Kf7 55. Qa1 Kg8 56. Qc1 Kf7 57. Qb1 Ne7 58. Bxe7 Kxe7 59. Qb6 Qd1+ 60. Kh2 Qd4 61. Qb7+ Ke6 62. Qc6+ Ke7 63. Kg2 e3 64. Qb7+ Ke6 65. Qc8+ Kd5 66. fxe3 Qg4 67. Qd8+ 1/2-1/2 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.26"] [Round "5.3"] [White "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Black "Georgiadis, Nico"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A18"] [WhiteElo "2779"] [BlackElo "2526"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e6 3. e4 d5 4. e5 d4 5. exf6 dxc3 6. bxc3 Qxf6 7. Nf3 Nc6 8. d4 e5 9. Be2 exd4 10. Bg5 Qg6 11. O-O Be7 ({According to Vachier-Lagrave} 11... dxc3 {which happened in a recent game is more interesting, for example} 12. Bd3 Qd6 13. Re1+ Be7 {as in Dubov,D (2701)-Nakamura,H (2787) Moscow 2018. "But it is a draw," added the Frenchman.}) 12. Bd3 {A novelty, which improves on an earlier game.} ({After} 12. Bxe7 Nxe7 13. cxd4 O-O 14. Bd3 Qf6 15. Qc2 h6 16. Rab1 {White also got a better position in Foglieni,M (2021) -Fantinel,T (2429) Bratto 2016}) 12... Qd6 (12... Qh5 {"is too dangerous for Black" (MVL). The French GM continued the line with} 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 14. Re1 {but was not exactly sure what he would do after} dxc3 {Most likely it would be:} 15. Qa4+ (15. Rb1 $5) 15... Bd7 16. Qb4 Be6 17. Re5 Qh6 18. Qb5+ c6 19. Qxb7 {with strong initiative.}) 13. Bxe7 Nxe7 ({White seriously considered the odd-looking} 13... Kxe7 14. Re1+ Be6 {when} 15. c5 $1 {is strong:} Qxc5 16. cxd4 Nxd4 17. Rc1 { For example} Nxf3+ 18. Qxf3 Qd6 19. Qxb7 Rhc8 20. Qe4 g6 21. Rc6 Qd7 22. Qb4+ Kf6 23. Qc3+ Ke7 24. Bb5 $1 {and White wins.}) 14. cxd4 O-O 15. Re1 {"This is just slightly better for White, a very unpleasant position." (MVL)} b6 ({On} 15... Bf5 16. c5 Qd8 ({Not} 16... Qd7 $2 17. Rxe7) ({But Vachier-Lagrave considered seriously the pawn sacrifice} 16... Qf6 17. Rxe7 ({Now} 17. Ne5 { does not yield White much after} Rad8 18. Bc4 Ng6) 17... Bxd3 18. Rxc7 Be4 19. Ne5 {White is a pawn up, but a strong bishop can sometimes compensate for it.} ({Georgiadis also calculated this line, but missed the little tactics} 19. d5 $2 Bxd5 {from afar.} 20. Qxd5 $4 Qxa1+)) 17. Bc4 {White preserves the advantage.}) 16. c5 Qf6 (16... bxc5 {"is a more serious try" (MVL) when} 17. dxc5 Qxc5 {Here} 18. Re5 {was the forcing line that Vachier-Lagrave considered seriously, but at the end of it} ({Georgiades apparently wanted to avoid the endgame after} 18. Rc1 Qd6 19. Bxh7+ Kxh7 20. Qxd6 cxd6 21. Rxe7 Kg6 {The less pieces (and pawns) the higher the drawing chances in my opinion, but apparently Black did not like to defend this.}) 18... Qd6 19. Be4 Ng6 20. Rb5 Qxd1+ 21. Rxd1 {The rook is trapped and} Ba6 22. Ra5 {is a double attack, but Black has a defense:} Rad8 ({Or even} 22... Be2 23. Re1 Bxf3 24. Bxf3 Rae8 25. Rxe8 Rxe8 26. g3 {although this is definitely big advantage for White thanks to the better minor piece.})) 17. Be4 c6 {A blunder, although the alternative wasn't much better.} ({If} 17... Rb8 18. Ne5 ({Or} 18. Qa4)) 18. cxb6 axb6 19. Qb1 {The double attack nets White a pawn.} Bf5 20. Qxb6 Bxe4 21. Rxe4 Qd6 { A good decision according to Vachier-Lagrave.} ({On} 21... Nd5 {White intended to consolidate with} 22. Qc5 Rfb8 ({There is also the cute line} 22... Qg6 23. Rae1 Rxa2 24. Qxf8+ Kxf8 25. Re8# {(MVL)}) 23. Qc2) 22. Qc5 Qxc5 23. dxc5 Nd5 { Next White consolidates his position.} 24. a4 g6 25. g3 Rfb8 26. Rc4 Ra6 27. Nd4 Rb2 28. Ra3 Kg7 29. Rd3 Ne7 (29... Nf6 {was mandatory according to White when} 30. Rb3 Ra2 31. Rb7 R2xa4 {loses to} (31... Kg8 {is not completely clear. }) 32. Rxa4 Rxa4 33. Ne6+ {(MVL)}) 30. Nf3 Nd5 ({If} 30... Ra2 31. Rd7) ({ However} 30... Ra7 {was a decent defensive try when} 31. Ne5 Ra2 32. Rd6 ({ Therefore White needs to play for a win with something like} 32. Rdd4) 32... R2xa4 33. Rxa4 Rxa4 34. Nxc6 Nxc6 35. Rxc6 {should be a draw.}) 31. Ne5 Rb4 ({ Here} 31... Nf6 {is met with} 32. Rd6) 32. Rxb4 Nxb4 33. Rd7 Kg8 ({If} 33... Kf6 34. Nxf7 Rxa4 35. Nd8 {an White gets closer.}) 34. Nxf7 Ra5 ({White should also win after} 34... Rxa4 35. Ng5 h6 36. Nf7 h5 37. Ng5 Ra1+ 38. Kg2 Rc1 39. Ne6) 35. Ng5 Rxc5 $2 {This hangs a rook but the position was lost anyway.} ( 35... Rxa4 36. Rxh7 {also wins.}) 36. Rd8+ Kg7 37. Ne6+ 1-0 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.27"] [Round "6.2"] [White "Georgiadis, Nico"] [Black "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B92"] [WhiteElo "2526"] [BlackElo "2801"] [PlyCount "78"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be2 e5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. Be3 Be6 9. Nd5 Nbd7 10. Qd3 Bxd5 11. exd5 Rc8 12. c4 O-O 13. O-O Ne8 14. Qd2 (14. f3 g6 15. Kh1 Ng7 16. Bg1 Bg5 17. Rad1 h5 18. Nd2 f5 {Karjakin,S (2782) -Grischuk,A (2766) Paris 2018}) 14... b6 15. Rac1 a5 16. Na1 f5 (16... g6 17. b4 Ng7 18. bxa5 bxa5 19. Bd3 Nc5 20. Bc2 a4 {Carlsen,M (2853)-Grischuk,A (2771) Saint Louis 2015}) 17. f3 (17. f4 $5) 17... f4 18. Bf2 Bh4 19. Bd3 Bxf2+ 20. Qxf2 Nc5 21. Bc2 g6 $5 {"If I play ...g6, I can always play ...g5. If I play .. .g5, I can never play ...g6 anymore." (Mamedyarov)} (21... g5 22. Nb3 Nxb3 23. Bxb3 Ng7 24. Bc2 {was what Georgiadis was hoping for.}) 22. Rfe1 Ng7 23. Be4 Qd7 24. Nc2 Nf5 25. b3 Kh8 26. Rb1 Ng7 ({Mamedyarov wasn't sure of} 26... g5 27. a3 Rg8 28. b4 axb4 29. axb4 Nxe4 30. fxe4 (30. Rxe4) 30... Nh4 31. Qxb6 g4 32. c5 g3 {but Georgadis was completely right when he said: "This looks like mate."}) 27. Na3 Nf5 28. Nb5 Rf6 (28... Ne3 29. Rxe3 fxe3 30. Qxe3 {and White is OK (Mamedyarov).}) 29. a3 g5 30. Nc3 $2 ({White had to take here:} 30. Bxf5 Qxf5 (30... Rxf5) 31. b4 axb4 32. axb4 Nd3 {and now the point missed by Georgiadis:} 33. Qc2 $1 Nxe1 34. Qxf5 Rxf5 35. Nxd6 {Mamedyarov}) 30... Nd4 31. b4 axb4 32. Rxb4 g4 33. Qh4 ({After} 33. Rxb6 {Black has many strong moves, e. g.} g3 (33... Rg8) (33... gxf3)) 33... Nxe4 34. Nxe4 Rg6 35. fxg4 Nc2 36. Rxb6 Nxe1 37. Nf6 Qg7 38. Rxd6 Rh6 39. Qxe1 Rxf6 0-1 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.27"] [Round "6.1"] [White "Navara, David"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D41"] [WhiteElo "2741"] [BlackElo "2842"] [PlyCount "89"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 c5 {Navara said he was a bit surprised about this.} 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. e4 Nxc3 7. bxc3 cxd4 8. cxd4 Bb4+ 9. Bd2 Bxd2+ 10. Qxd2 O-O 11. Rc1 b6 12. Bd3 Ba6 {Here Navara was "out of book." "I remembered this was supposed to be the best here." (Carlsen)} 13. Bxa6 (13. O-O Bxd3 14. Qxd3 Nd7 15. e5 Re8 16. Rc3 Nf8 {Li,C (2725)-Wei,Y (2734) Ningbo 2018}) 13... Nxa6 14. O-O Rc8 (14... Qe7 15. Qe2 Qb7 16. Ne5 Rac8 17. h4 Nb8 18. Nc4 Qa6 19. Rc2 Nd7 {So,W (2788)-Dominguez Perez,L (2739) Saint Louis 2017}) 15. Rxc8 (15. h4 $5 Qd6 (15... h6 $5)) 15... Qxc8 16. Rc1 Qb7 17. Qc2 Nb4 {Navara was surprised that this move "worked."} 18. Qc4 a5 19. a3 b5 20. Qc7 Qxc7 21. Rxc7 Nd3 22. g3 (22. Rc3 Nf4 {and}) (22. d5 exd5 23. exd5 Rd8 24. Nd4 g6 {are equal. }) 22... Rb8 {Navara expected it to finish in a draw but then got surprised about this move.} (22... f5 23. Ng5 b4 24. axb4 axb4 {is equal.}) (22... Ra8 $6 23. Kf1 b4 (23... a4 24. Ke2 Nb2 25. Nd2) 24. Ke2 Nb2 25. axb4 axb4 26. Rb7) ( 22... h6 23. Rc3 Nb2 24. Rb3 Nc4 25. Rxb5 Ra8 26. Rb3 a4 27. Rc3 Nd6 {might also be possible.}) 23. Rc3 {"A winning attempt." (Navara)} (23. d5 exd5 24. exd5 g6) 23... Nb2 24. Ne5 f6 $1 {With this move Carlsen calculated more or less everything that follows.} (24... Nc4 $6 25. Nxc4 Rc8 26. Kf1 bxc4 27. Ke2 Kf8 28. Kd2) 25. Nc6 Ra8 26. Rb3 Nc4 27. Rxb5 a4 28. d5 exd5 29. exd5 Nxa3 30. Rc5 (30. Rb4 Nc2 31. Rb2 a3 ({not} 31... Na3 $2 32. d6 Nc4 33. d7 Nxb2 34. Ne7+ Kf7 35. Nc8) 32. Ra2 Ra6 33. Kf1 Kf7 {is also a draw.}) 30... Kf7 31. Nd4 Ke7 ( {Navara had seen} 31... Ra7 32. d6 Ke8 33. Rc7 Rxc7 34. dxc7 Kd7 35. Ne6 { followed by 36.Nc5+.}) 32. Rc3 Nb1 33. Rc7+ Kd6 34. Nb5+ Kxd5 (34... Ke5 35. f4+ (35. Re7+ Kxd5 36. Re1 Nd2 37. Nc7+ Kd6 38. Nxa8 Nf3+ 39. Kf1 Nxe1 40. Nb6) 35... Ke4 36. d6 a3 37. Re7+ Kd5 38. d7 a2 39. Re8 a1=Q 40. Rxa8 Qxa8 41. Nc7+ Kc6 42. Nxa8 Kxd7 43. Nb6+ {Navara}) 35. Rc1 a3 36. Rxb1 a2 37. Nc3+ Kd4 38. Nxa2 ({Carlsen pointed out a line another drawing that Navara hadn't seen:} 38. Ne2+ Kd3 39. Nc1+ Kc2 40. Ra1 Kb2 41. Rxa2+ Rxa2 42. Nxa2 Kxa2 43. Kg2 Kb3 44. Kf3 Kc4 45. Ke4 Kc5) 38... Rxa2 39. Rb7 Ke4 40. Kg2 g5 41. Rxh7 Kf5 42. Rg7 g4 43. Rh7 Kg6 44. Rh4 f5 45. h3 1/2-1/2 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.27"] [Round "6.3"] [White "Svidler, Peter"] [Black "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A34"] [WhiteElo "2753"] [BlackElo "2779"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "62"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nb4 6. Bc4 Nd3+ 7. Ke2 Nf4+ 8. Kf1 Ne6 9. d3 ({Both games in Georgia went} 9. h4 {One of them was decisive for the match and continued} Nd4 10. d3 e6 11. Bf4 a6 12. Nxd4 cxd4 13. Ne2 Nc6 14. a3 Bd6 15. Bxd6 Qxd6 16. Qd2 Bd7 17. f4 e5 18. f5 g6 {as was annotated here on Chess. com; Svidler,P (2751)-Vachier Lagrave,M (2804) Tbilisi 2017}) 9... Nc6 ({According to Svidler there is nothing wrong with} 9... g6 10. h4 h5 {The Russian GM in fact was astonished that his opponent never used the idea in none of their three games.}) 10. h4 g6 11. h5 ({A predecessor saw:} 11. Be3 Ned4 12. Nd5 Bg7 13. Nxd4 Bxd4 14. h5 Bxe3 15. Nxe3 g5 {Krassowizkij,J (2452) -Clitan,Z (2115) Ditzingen 2017}) 11... Bg7 12. Be3 ({In the press conference players briefly discusses another way to improve, the clever} 12. Qd2 $1 { The idea is to trade everything along the h-file and sneak into the black camp via the h6 square. After} Ne5 ({Perhaps Black needs to proceed with the development with} 12... Bd7 13. hxg6 {and agree to worsen his pawn structure} fxg6 ({As} 13... hxg6 $6 14. Rxh8+ Bxh8 15. Qh6 Bg7 16. Qh7 {is excellent for the first player.})) 13. Nxe5 ({Or the immediate} 13. hxg6) 13... Bxe5 14. hxg6 hxg6 15. Rxh8+ Bxh8 16. Qh6 Bg7 17. Qh7 {the plan is fulfilled and White is definitely better.}) ({White avoided the natural-looking} 12. h6 Bd4 13. Nxd4 Nexd4 {"which only developes the black pieces" (Svidler)}) ({Also interesting was} 12. Nd5 $5 Ned4 13. h6 Be5 14. Nxe5 Nxe5 15. Bf4 {which they both liked a lot for White, although things might not be that clear after} f6) 12... Ned4 13. h6 ({Nothing yields} 13. Nb5 Nxf3 14. Qxf3 Ne5) 13... Bf6 14. Nd5 Bg4 15. Nxf6+ exf6 16. Bxd4 Nxd4 ({Both players saw the tricky:} 16... Bxf3 17. Bxf7+ $1 Kxf7 18. Qb3+ Ke8 {when Vachier-Lagrave believed that best is:} 19. Qe6+ $1 ({Whereas Svidler was tempted by} 19. Bxc5 Bg4 20. Qxb7 Bd7 {although it seems as Black can hold his position together in this line.}) 19... Qe7 20. Qxe7+ Nxe7 21. Bxf6 Rf8 22. Bxe7 Kxe7 23. gxf3 Rxf3 {with winning chances for White.} ) 17. Qa4+ Qd7 ({Black did not want to play the position after} 17... Bd7 18. Qa3 Qe7 ({Although MVL was seriously investigating the line} 18... b5 19. Bd5 $1 (19. Nxd4 bxc4 {seems to work well for Black.}) 19... b4 20. Qa6 Bb5 { Hoping to trap the white queen. Unfortunately for him} 21. Qb7 {creates a double threat and} Bxd3+ {can be met with the key move} 22. Ke1 $1 {Prevents the trade of the queens and wins material for White after say} ({Worse is} 22. Kg1 Ne2+ 23. Kh2 Qb8+ {and Black saves everything.}) 22... O-O 23. Nxd4 cxd4 24. Qxa8 {and White should win.}) 19. Nxd4 cxd4 20. Qb3 {With the queens on, White should be better.}) ({Svidler expected} 17... Ke7 18. Nxd4 Qxd4 19. Qb3 { but Vachier-Lagrave calculated that he will lose a pawn after} Rab8 ({It seems as Svidler's intuition was correct though as Black has the strong resource} 19... b5 $1 {When White cannot capture anything:} 20. Bxf7 $2 {drops a piece to } (20. Qxb5 $2 {leads to decisive attack for Black after} Rhb8 21. Qc6 Rxb2) ({ And} 20. Bxb5 a6 21. Bc4 Rhb8 22. Qc3 Rxb2 23. Qxd4 cxd4 {regains the pawn with advantage for Black.}) ({Best would be} 20. Bd5 Be6 21. Bxe6 fxe6 { with equality as} 22. Qxb5 $2 Rhb8 {does not work again.}) 20... c4) 20. Bxf7 Rhd8 21. Bd5 {and dismissed the line.}) 18. Qxd7+ Bxd7 19. Nxd4 cxd4 20. e5 ({ Correct was} 20. Ke2 Ke7 21. Rhc1 Rhc8 22. Bd5 (22. a4 f5) 22... Be6 {(MVL, Svidler) with a likely draw.}) 20... fxe5 21. Re1 f6 22. f4 Rf8 23. Kg1 Ke7 24. fxe5 f5 25. Rh4 f4 ({White was hoping to torture his opponent in the line:} 25... Be6 26. Bxe6 Kxe6 27. Rxd4 Rfd8) 26. Re4 g5 27. Rh5 (27. Rh1 Rf5 28. Kf2 Bc6 {is clearly better for Black.}) 27... Rf5 {Missed by Svidler. Now he thought for about twenty minutes in order to repair the damage. However...} 28. g4 ({Perhaps White should have tried} 28. Rxd4 Rxe5 29. Rd5 Rxd5 30. Bxd5 Kf6 31. Bxb7 Rb8 32. Be4 Bf5 {although Black's edge is indisputable here.}) 28... fxg3 29. Rg4 Raf8 30. Rhxg5 {Svidler realized that he had missed something else, a mate...} ({From afar the Russian GM thought that he forces a draw with } 30. Rgxg5 Rf1+ 31. Kg2 {but spotted at the last moment that} R1f2+ $1 { is a forced mate-} 32. Kxg3 (32. Kg1 Bc6 $1 33. Rxg3 Rf1+ 34. Kh2 Rh1#) 32... R8f3+ 33. Kh4 Rh3#) ({Neither does} 30. Rxg3 {help after} Bc6 31. Rgxg5 Rf1+ 32. Kh2 R8f2+ 33. Kg3 ({Or} 33. Kh3 Rh1+ 34. Kg3 Rg2+ 35. Kf4 Rf1#) 33... Rg2+ 34. Kh4 Rh1#) 30... Rf1+ 31. Kg2 Bc6+ (31... Bc6+ {White resigned due to} 32. Kxg3 Rg1+ (32... R8f3+ {would also do as White needs to part with the rook in order to avoid mate:} 33. Kh2 R3f2+ 34. Kh3 (34. Rg2) 34... Rh1+ 35. Kg3 Rg2+ 36. Kf4 Rf1#) 33. Kh2 Rh1+ 34. Kg3 Rf3+ 35. Kg2 Rxd3+ 36. Kf2 {And now the rook returns to f3 with the following maneuver:} Rd2+ 37. Kg3 Rg2+ 38. Kf4 Rf2+ 39. Kg3 Rf3+ {to win the bishop as well.} 40. Kg2 Rc3+) 0-1 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.29"] [Round "7.2"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B90"] [WhiteElo "2842"] [BlackElo "2779"] [PlyCount "97"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. f3 e5 7. Nb3 Be6 8. Be3 h5 9. Qd2 Nbd7 10. Nd5 Bxd5 11. exd5 g6 12. Be2 (12. O-O-O Nb6 13. Kb1 Nbxd5 14. Bg5 Be7 15. Bd3 Rc8 16. Rhe1 O-O 17. h3 b5 18. g4 h4 19. Bxh4 Nf4 {Vidit,S (2707)-Korobov,A (2678) Poikovsky 2018}) 12... Bg7 13. O-O a5 $5 {"I tried a little experiment in the opening that was a little dubious but gave plenty of play." (MVL)} 14. a4 O-O 15. Bb5 (15. Nc1 Nc5 16. c3 Qc7 17. Rd1 Kh7 18. Ra2 Ng8 19. Bb5 e4 20. f4 Ne7 {Palekha,A (2421)-Kovchan,A (2536) Serpukhov 2003}) 15... Qc7 16. c4 b6 17. h3 Nc5 18. Nxc5 bxc5 19. Ra3 Nh7 20. Rb3 f5 21. Bc6 ({ In hindsight, Carlsen suggested} 21. Qe1) 21... Rab8 {"I think this was a miscalculation but still it's not so simple." (Carlsen)} (21... Ra7 22. Qe1 { was "terrible" according to MVL.}) 22. Rb5 f4 23. Bf2 e4 24. Qc2 $1 {Missed by MVL. "I was counting on that from far away and I was very optimistic about my chances for sure." (Carlsen)} Qe7 (24... e3 25. Be1 {attacks a5 and g6.}) 25. Qxe4 Qxe4 26. fxe4 Ng5 27. Re1 Nf7 28. Rb1 Ng5 29. Rxa5 $2 {"Basically I just missed that the d3-square existed, which is pretty unforgivable." (Carlsen)} ( 29. Bh4 $6 Nxe4 30. Be7 f3 {MVL}) (29. Be1 f3 $5 30. h4 Bd4+ 31. Kf1 Nxe4 32. Rxb8 fxg2+ 33. Kxg2 Rxb8 34. Bxa5 Rb3 {and Black is OK. "Long variation, wrong variation," - Carlsen.}) 29... Rb3 30. Rb5 Rd3 {"Here I was terrified. It's coming apart." (Carlsen)} 31. Re1 ({Carlsen really wanted to play} 31. b4 Nxe4 32. bxc5 {but he thought} Rd2 {was very strong. However, it's not completely clear after} 33. cxd6 Rxf2 34. Re1 Rxg2+ 35. Kxg2 f3+ 36. Kh1 Ng3+ 37. Kh2 f2 38. Rbb1) 31... f3 (31... Bd4 {is also interesting (MVL).}) 32. h4 Nf7 ({ Engines point out that} 32... Rd2 $3 {was a winning move here, and MVL did consider it. However, after} 33. hxg5 fxg2 34. Be3 {it's very hard for humans to find the quiet} Rc2 $3 {when Black wins beautifully. As soon as he was told Rc2 is the winning move, MVL saw why:} ({MVL looked at} 34... Bd4 {but the simple} 35. Rb3 {just wins}) 35. Bd7 (35. Ra5 Rf3 $1) 35... Be5 $1 36. Bh3 Rf1+ 37. Rxf1 Bh2+ $1 38. Kxh2 gxf1=Q+ {Amazing stuff.}) 33. a5 Ne5 34. a6 Rd2 35. a7 fxg2 (35... Rxf2 36. Kxf2 Ng4+ 37. Kf1 Nh2+ 38. Kf2 Ng4+ {is just a draw.}) 36. a8=Q ({Also interesting was} 36. Rb8 Nf3+ 37. Kxg2 Nxe1+ 38. Kf1 Rdxf2+ 39. Kxe1 Kh7 $1 40. Rxf8 Rxf8 41. a8=Q Rxa8 42. Bxa8 {but Carlsen felt his bishop was "so terrible" that this could well be lost for White, although a study-like draw might still exist after} Bf6 43. e5 Bxh4+ 44. Ke2 Be7 45. b4 ( 45. e6 g5 46. Kf3 Kg6) 45... dxe5 46. bxc5 Bxc5) 36... Nf3+ 37. Kxg2 Nxe1+ 38. Kf1 Rdxf2+ 39. Kxe1 Rxa8 40. Kxf2 Rf8+ 41. Ke2 Rf4 42. b4 cxb4 (42... Rxe4+ 43. Kf3 Rxc4 44. bxc5 {is an obvious draw (MVL).}) 43. c5 Be5 44. cxd6 Bxd6 45. Kd3 Kf7 46. Rb6 Bc5 ({"I'm not really in danger after} 46... Rxh4 {" - MVL. "But you're not really in danger of winning either!" - Carlsen.}) 47. Rb5 Bd6 48. Rb6 Bc5 49. Rb5 1/2-1/2 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.29"] [Round "7.3"] [White "Georgiadis, Nico"] [Black "Svidler, Peter"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B90"] [WhiteElo "2526"] [BlackElo "2753"] [PlyCount "56"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e6 {Svidler spent eight minutes on this move...} 7. g4 h6 8. h4 e5 {...and 18 minutes on this one. Svidler said that when this line in fashion and he played it as White, he tried all kinds of moves but not h4.} ({He also looked at} 8... d5 {quite deeply.}) 9. Nf5 g6 (9... Nc6 10. Bc4 Be6 11. Bb3 h5 12. gxh5 Bxf5 13. exf5 Qd7 {Kobalia,M (2677)-Inarkiev,E (2707) Konya 2012}) 10. Nxh6 (10. Bg2 d5) 10... Bxh6 11. Bxh6 (11. g5 Ng4 12. gxh6 (12. Bc1 Qb6 {was what Svidler had calculated.}) 12... Nxe3 13. fxe3 Rxh6 14. Qf3 Be6 15. O-O-O Nc6 16. h5 Qg5 { Kurmann,O (2456)-Fier,A (2573) Basel 2013}) 11... Bxg4 12. f3 ({Svidler expected} 12. Qd2 Nc6 13. Bg5 Nd4 14. Bg2 Bf3 15. Kf1 {and now} Qd7 ({not Svidler's} 15... Qc8 16. Bxf3 Nxf3 17. Qxd6) 16. Bxf6 Bxg2+ 17. Kxg2 Qg4+ 18. Kf1 Qf3 19. Rh2 Qxf6 20. Nd5 Qd8 {is equal.}) 12... Bxf3 13. Qxf3 Rxh6 14. O-O-O (14. Bc4 Nbd7 15. O-O-O) 14... Nc6 15. Bxa6 (15. Qf2 Nd4 16. Bh3 Nh5 17. Nd5 Ng3 18. Rhf1 Nxf1 19. Rxf1 f5 {Boemelburg,H-Kosmol,H Germany 1996}) ({ Svidler thought} 15. Bc4 Nd4 (15... Rc8 $5) 16. Rxd4 exd4 17. e5 {was strong but after} dxc3 (17... dxe5 18. Ne4 g5 19. Rf1 $1) 18. exf6 {he might have missed} Rh5 $1 19. Qxb7 d5 20. Bd3 Rb8 21. Qc6+ Kf8 22. Qxc3 Rb6 {and it's not clear if White has enough compensation.}) 15... Rxa6 16. Rhf1 ({Georgiadis suggested} 16. Rdf1 {but Svidler had spotted} Nb4 $3 {during the game:} 17. a3 d5 18. axb4 dxe4 19. Qe3 Ra1+ 20. Nb1 Rh5) 16... Nd4 17. Rxd4 (17. Qxf6 Qxf6 18. Rxf6 {is good for Black but he should avoid} Rxh4 $6 (18... Ne6 $1 { Georgiadis.}) 19. Rdf1 Rh7 20. Nd5 Rxa2 21. Kb1 Ra5 22. Rxd6 Rh2 23. Nc7+ Ke7 24. Rdf6) 17... exd4 18. Nd5 Rxa2 $1 19. Nxf6+ Kf8 20. Kb1 Ra5 ({The engine says} 20... Ra7 {is more accurate.}) 21. Qf4 Kg7 22. b4 Rb5 23. Nd5 (23. Kc1 $5 ) 23... f5 $1 {Now everything works for Black.} 24. exf5 Rxd5 25. f6+ Kh7 26. Qe4 Rhh5 27. Qe6 Qf8 28. Qd7+ Kh6 0-1 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.29"] [Round "7.1"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Navara, David"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E10"] [WhiteElo "2801"] [BlackElo "2741"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "135"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. e3 c5 5. Nc3 a6 6. cxd5 exd5 7. Be2 Nc6 8. O-O cxd4 9. Nxd4 Bd6 ({Navara did not like} 9... Bc5 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Qa4) 10. b3 ({Instead} 10. Nf3 O-O 11. b3 Be6 12. Bb2 Qe7 13. Qd3 Rfd8 14. Rac1 Ne5 15. Qd4 {was the course of the game Grigoriants,S (2563)-Matlakov,M (2694) Tallinn 2016 }) 10... Be5 11. Nxc6 {A novelty.} (11. Ba3 Nxd4 12. exd4 Bd6 13. Bxd6 Qxd6 14. Bf3 {Biljanic,L (2322)-Todorovic, N (2100) Nis 2013}) 11... bxc6 12. Bb2 h5 ({ Black can also play something normal like} 12... O-O) ({or} 12... Bf5 {with a typical, slightly better position for White thanks to the isolated pair of pawns on c6 and d5.}) 13. f4 $1 Bb8 ({From afar Navara calculated the line} 13... Bd6 14. Na4 Ng4 15. Qd4 ({but then he saw both} 15. Qc1 $1) ({and} 15. Qc2 $1 {which are very unpleasant for Black to say the least.}) 15... Qh4 16. h3 Qg3 17. hxg4 hxg4 18. Qxg7 Rh2 {The Czech GM thought that at least he is not losing here. Indeed,} 19. Qg8+ $2 {would be mate to the white king after} ( {However White can fight for the advantage with the only move:} 19. Rf2 Qh4 20. Qh8+ Qxh8 21. Bxh8 Rxh8) 19... Bf8 20. Bf3 Qh4) 14. Na4 Ba7 15. Bd4 {Now Mamedyarov fixes the isolated pawns and also his advantage.} Bg4 16. Bxg4 hxg4 17. Rc1 Qd6 18. Qc2 (18. Nc5 $5 {was also interesting.}) 18... Bxd4 19. exd4 O-O {The best way to part with the pawn.} ({On} 19... Rc8 20. Rfe1+ Ne4 { White has the tactical resource} 21. Nb6 Rc7 22. Nxd5 $1) 20. Qxc6 Qa3 21. Qc2 Rac8 22. Qb2 Qxb2 23. Nxb2 {Navara believed that he has enough compensation for a pawn here but this is hardly the case.} Rxc1 ({The Czech GM suggested instead:} 23... Rfe8 {when something passive like} 24. Rxc8 ({However} 24. Nd3 {makes things much harder for Black and in order to stay in the game he has to find some non-trivial resources:} Rxc1 25. Rxc1 Re2 26. Nb4 a5 27. Rc2 Re1+ 28. Kf2 g3+ $1 29. hxg3 ({Of course not} 29. Kxe1 $4 gxh2) 29... Re4 30. Nd3 Ng4+ { although White's chances are superior here as well.}) 24... Rxc8 25. Nd3 Rc3 26. Rd1 a5 {would indeed promise Black compensation.}) 24. Rxc1 Re8 25. Kf1 $1 {Missed by Black. Mamedyarov sacrifices the pawn back but increases the activity of his pieces and maintains the better pawn structure. His queenside potential passers are particularly dangerous.} ({He was probably hoping for either} 25. Na4 Re2) ({or} 25. Rc2 g3 $1 26. hxg3 Ng4 27. Nd3 Re4 {when things are not clear at all.}) 25... Re4 26. g3 Rxd4 27. Ke2 g5 ({Navara regretted that he did not do this a move later:} 27... Re4+ 28. Kd3 g5 29. fxg5 Nd7 { when Nd7-e5 comes with a tempo.}) 28. fxg5 ({Back was also worried about} 28. Rc6 {but hoped he can survive after the tactical line:} Ne4 29. Nd3 gxf4 30. gxf4 g3 31. hxg3 Nxg3+ {"when I do not lose material at once" (Navara). If} 32. Ke3 ({Best is} 32. Kd2 Kg7 {when Navara foresaw the trick:} 33. Rxa6 $2 ({ However} 33. b4 $1 {preserves White's winning chances.}) 33... Ne4+ 34. Ke3 Rxd3+ 35. Kxd3 Nc5+ 36. Kd4 Nxa6 37. a4 {with a draw.}) 32... Re4+) 28... Ne4 29. Nd3 Nxg5 30. Nf2 $1 {Also missed by Navara. The knight is working perfectly from here.} Rb4 31. Rc5 ({Here stronger was:} 31. Rc6 $1 {when Black cannot save all his pawns:} Ne4 ({Or} 31... a5 32. Ra6 Rb5 33. Nxg4) 32. Rxa6 Nxf2 33. Kxf2 {in comparison to the game White is a valuable tempo ahead.}) 31... Ne4 {The best chance is the rook endgame. Very often the weaker side can save themselves down a pawn or even two.} 32. Ra5 Nxf2 33. Kxf2 Rb6 34. Rxd5 Rh6 35. Ke3 $1 {Excellent decision. Rook endgames are never won with passive play.} ({After} 35. Kg2 Rc6 36. Rd2 Rc3 {(Navara) Black should indeed survive.} ) 35... Rxh2 36. Ra5 f5 37. Rxa6 Rg2 38. Kf4 Rf2+ 39. Kg5 Rf3 40. Kh4 $1 { Keeping the things together on the kingside and gaining time to advance the passers on the other wing. With careful play White should win now.} Kf7 41. b4 Ke7 42. b5 Kd7 43. Ra7+ Kd6 44. Rf7 Rf2 45. b6 Rxa2 46. Rxf5 Rb2 47. Rh5 ({ Mamedyarov could have won faster with the simple} 47. Kxg4 Ke7 48. Kh5 Rxb6 49. g4 Rb8 50. g5 {(Navara). The pawn has passed the equator and the frontal defense does not work:} Rh8+ 51. Kg6 Rg8+ 52. Kh6 Rh8+ 53. Kg7) 47... Rb4 48. Rh8 Ke5 49. Rb8 Kf6 50. Kh5 Kg7 51. Kg5 {White is winning here as well (unless the tablebase will prove me wrong), but he has to be careful for some things. In particular, he should never push his pawn to the seventh rank as then even if he wins the g-pawn it will be a theoretical draw.} Kf7 52. Rb7+ Ke8 53. Kh4 Kf8 54. Kh5 Ke8 55. Rb8+ Kf7 56. Kg5 Kg7 57. Rb7+ Kf8 58. Kf6 Ke8 59. Rb8+ ({ Easier would have been} 59. Re7+ Kf8 (59... Kd8 60. b7) 60. Rf7+ Kg8 61. Rb7 Rb3 62. Kg6 Kf8 63. Rf7+ Ke8 64. b7 {When Black cannot avoid the rook trade after:} Rb6+ 65. Kg7 Kd8 66. b8=Q+ Rxb8 67. Rf8+ Kc7 68. Rxb8 Kxb8 69. Kf6) 59... Kd7 60. Kg5 Kc6 61. Kh5 Re4 62. Rg8 Kxb6 63. Rxg4 Re3 64. Rg7 Kc6 65. g4 Kd6 66. g5 Ke6 67. Kg6 Rg3 68. Ra7 1-0 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.30"] [Round "8.3"] [White "Navara, David"] [Black "Georgiadis, Nico"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E52"] [WhiteElo "2741"] [BlackElo "2526"] [Annotator "Hess, R"] [PlyCount "102"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e3 Nf6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Bd3 b6 7. O-O Bb7 8. cxd5 exd5 9. Ne5 (9. a3 Bd6 10. b4 a6 11. Qb3 Qe7 {is another popular variation.}) 9... Nbd7 10. f4 c5 {Georgiadis has experience in this line, having played it against former 2700+ GM Igor Kovalenko. The result (a loss) had nothing to do with the opening, which in fact secured him quite a decent position.} 11. Ne2 { Navara deviates from that game.} (11. Bd2 Ne4 12. Rc1 Rc8 13. Be1 Nxe5 14. dxe5 Bxc3 15. bxc3 f5 16. Qh5 Qd7 17. Rd1 Qe6 18. Qe2 Rcd8 {Kovalenko,I (2702) -Georgiadis,N (2485) Riga 2015}) 11... cxd4 ({English legend Michael Adams obtained a better position, before eventually losing, against Fabiano Caruana: } 11... c4 12. Bf5 g6 13. Qa4 gxf5 14. Qxb4 Ne4 15. a4 f6 16. Nf3 Nb8 17. Qe1 Nc6 18. Bd2 Kh8 {Caruana,F (2787)-Adams,M (2744) Wijk aan Zee 2016}) 12. exd4 Bd6 13. Ng3 Ne4 (13... g6 {is sensible, preventing the knight from hopping to f5. But at what cost? Georgiadis clearly did not want to weaken his dark squares and welcome an eventual f4-f5 push.}) 14. Nf5 Ndf6 15. Qf3 {Novelty.} ( 15. g4 Bc8 16. Ne3 Bxe5 17. fxe5 Ne8 18. Qf3 Bb7 19. b3 Ng5 20. Qg2 f6 21. Nf5 Qd7 22. Bxg5 fxg5 23. e6 Qc7 24. Rac1 {1-0 (24) Vaisser,A (2540) -Hohler,P (2218) Kamena Vourla 2012}) 15... Bc7 (15... Bc8 {gives White the two bishops, but it saves precious time. White is probably best off playing} 16. Ne3 { when Black is happy to return his bishop to b7, since the bishop on c1 no longer can develop.}) 16. Be3 Nd6 17. Rac1 Nfe4 (17... Nxf5 $6 {plays into White's hands.} 18. Bxf5 Ne4 19. Qh3 {is scary for Black, who has to consider sacrifices at every turn. For example} g6 (19... h6 20. Ng4 {with the threat of Nxh6} Bc8 21. Bxe4 Bxg4 (21... dxe4 22. f5 f6 23. Nxh6+ gxh6 24. Qg4+ Kh8 25. Qh5 {with a crushing attack.}) 22. Qxg4 dxe4 23. f5 Qd6 24. f6 Qxh2+ (24... g6 25. Qh4 h5 26. g4 {is straightforward.}) 25. Kf2 g6 26. Rh1 Qd6 27. Rxc7 $1 {distracting the queen and leading to a very direct checkmate down the h-file.} ) 20. Nxf7 $1 Rxf7 21. Be6 Qe7 22. f5 {sees White crashing through.}) 18. Nxd6 {Black breathes a sigh of relief, as his position immediately becomes far more stable.} (18. Nxg7 $1 Kxg7 19. f5 {deserves serious attention [Navara did look at it - PD], though without a clear knockout blow such a sacrifice is risky. Some crazy lines have engine backing.} f6 (19... Nf6 20. Qg3+ Kh8 21. Bg5 { is simple. The queen is overloaded and White's attack is overwhelming.}) 20. Qh3 fxe5 (20... Kg8 21. Bh6 Qe7 22. Rf4 Nf7 23. Rxe4 dxe4 24. Bc4) 21. Bh6+ Kh8 22. Bxf8 {should be better for White, who has rook and pawn (and attack) for two minors. Essential to so many lines is that the bishop on c7 lacks protection.}) 18... Bxd6 19. f5 Rc8 20. Rce1 f6 21. Ng6 {This move has more bark than bite, since Black can ignore it.} Re8 (21... hxg6 $2 22. fxg6 Re8 23. Qh5 {may not lead to mate, but the attack rages on with White winning the no less than the g7 and f6 pawns.}) 22. Nf4 Bxf4 23. Bxf4 Qd7 24. Qd1 {No longer dictating the action, Navara opts for a tactical sequence to defend his overextended f5 pawn.} (24. Be3 Bc6 {with the idea of trading bishops on b5 is strong. Black would love nothing more than to have a strong knight versus a relatively weak bishop ending.} (24... Qa4) 25. Qe2 Re7 {with doubling to follow.}) 24... Qxf5 25. Bb8 Qe6 ({If Georgiadis wanted to secure an advantage without any risk, he could have played} 25... Qd7 26. Bxa7 Bc6 27. Bxb6 Rb8 28. Bc5 Rxb2 {The main reason Black would refrain from playing this sequence: the upside does not appear as high as the game continuation, where that bishop is trapped.}) 26. Bxa7 Ra8 27. Qb3 Qf7 (27... Rxa7 $2 28. Rxe4 $1 dxe4 29. Bc4 { nets White a queen for a rook and bishop.}) 28. Qxb6 Re6 29. Qa5 Bc6 30. Rxe4 $6 (30. Bxe4 {saves the bishop, but White goes down no less than a pawn.} dxe4 31. d5 Re5 32. Qb6 Bxd5 33. Bb8 Re6 34. Qd4 Qb7 {and a2 falls.}) 30... dxe4 31. Bc4 Rxa7 32. Qc5 Rc7 (32... Rd7 {was a winning move, with fantastic geometry allowing Georgiadis to bring home the full point.} 33. d5 Qh5 $1) 33. Rc1 e3 34. b4 $2 (34. d5 {saved Navara, who would restore material equality by force.} Bxd5 35. Qxd5 Kh8 36. Re1 Rxc4 37. Qxc4) 34... e2 35. Re1 Kh8 {A completely understandable move, avoiding all checks on the diagonal. However, Black had much better.} (35... Rc8 $1 {was the winning idea. Now Black can safely retreat his bishop to d7, defending both rooks at the same time.} 36. Rxe2 (36. d5 Re4) 36... Bd7) 36. b5 Qe7 $2 {In timetrouble Geogiadis throws away the entire advantage.} (36... Bxb5 37. Qxb5 (37. Bxe6 Rxc5 38. Bxf7 Rf5 {is decisive.}) 37... Qe8 $1 {kept Black well ahead. Georgiadis would keep his extra material because of the threat of the queen trade.}) 37. Bxe6 {Now major trades happen, resulting in an easy draw.} Qxc5 38. dxc5 Bxb5 39. Bg4 Rxc5 40. Bxe2 Ba4 41. Rb1 g6 42. Rb4 Rc2 43. Bd1 Rc1 44. Rxa4 Rxd1+ 45. Kf2 Rd2+ 46. Kf3 Kg7 47. Ra7+ Kh6 48. a4 Ra2 49. a5 Kg5 50. a6 h5 51. Ra8 Kf5 1/2-1/2 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.30"] [Round "8.1"] [White "Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime"] [Black "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C82"] [WhiteElo "2779"] [BlackElo "2801"] [PlyCount "84"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5 8. dxe5 Be6 9. c3 Bc5 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. Bc2 Nxf2 12. Rxf2 f6 13. Nf1 {Not the main line. "I just knew it was an interesting move." (MVL)} (13. exf6 Qxf6 (13... Bxf2+) 14. Qf1 $1 Bg4 15. Kh1 Bxf2 16. Qxf2 Rae8 17. Qg3 Ne5 18. Bd1 {Smyslov, V-Botvinnik,M Moscow 1943}) 13... Bxf2+ 14. Kxf2 fxe5 15. Kg1 Qd6 16. Ng3 {New. } (16. Ng5 Bf5 17. Bb3 Ne7 18. Ne3 Rad8 19. Bd2 c5 20. Nxf5 Nxf5 21. Qe2 h6 22. Ne4 Qb6 23. Be3 Rf7 {Darga,K-Larsen,B Copenhagen 1953}) 16... h6 17. Qe1 Bg4 18. Nh4 e4 19. h3 (19. Nxe4 {fails to} Rae8) 19... Bd7 20. Be3 {MVL thought this was a serious try for an advantage.} ({After} 20. Nxe4 Rae8 21. Be3 Rxe4 22. Bxe4 dxe4 23. Rd1 Qe6 24. Qg3 {Black is OK.}) 20... Qf6 ({Here Mamedyarov saw that} 20... g5 {fails to} 21. Nxe4 $1 dxe4 22. Rd1 Qf6 (22... Qe6 23. Bb3) (22... Qe7 23. Ng6) 23. Rxd7 gxh4 24. Bxe4 {and White is winning.}) 21. Nh5 Qe5 (21... Qf7 22. Nf4 g5 $6 (22... Ne7) 23. Nxd5 $1 Be6 {and now White has the nice move} 24. c4 $1 bxc4 25. Nc3 gxh4 26. Qxh4 {with a clear advantage.}) 22. Nf4 ({MVL didn't like} 22. g4 Be8 {but in the analysis he saw that} 23. Ng3 { might be better for White.}) 22... Rxf4 23. Ng6 Rf1+ 24. Kxf1 Qf5+ 25. Nf4 g5 26. Qg3 Kh7 27. Ke2 gxf4 28. Qxf4 Qxf4 29. Bxf4 {MVL had calculated all this but he had underestimated} Rg8 $1 30. Kf2 (30. g4 h5) 30... Rf8 31. Ke3 Ne7 32. Bxc7 Nf5+ 33. Ke2 b4 34. Bf4 ({Just in time MVL noticed} 34. g3 Nd4+ $5 35. cxd4 Bb5+ 36. Kd2 Rf2+ 37. Kc1 Rf1+ 38. Bd1 e3 39. Kc2 e2 40. Bxe2 Rxa1 41. Bxb5 axb5) 34... bxc3 (34... Bb5+ 35. Kf2) 35. bxc3 Nh4 36. g3 Ng2 37. c4 Nxf4+ 38. gxf4 Rc8 39. Rd1 Rxc4 40. Bb3 Ba4 41. Rxd5 Bxb3 42. axb3 Rc3 1/2-1/2 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.07.31"] [Round "9.1"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E65"] [WhiteElo "2801"] [BlackElo "2842"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "113"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. Nc3 d6 6. Nf3 c5 7. O-O Nc6 8. e3 { A rare line.} ({The symmetrical position after} 8. dxc5 dxc5 9. Bf4 Nd4 { is allowing White a chance to play for a win without much risk, but with not too may chances either, Matlakov,M (2718)-Jones,G (2640) Wijk aan Zee 2018}) ({ The main line runs} 8. d5 Na5 9. Nd2 {as Carlsen has played recently:} a6 10. Rb1 Rb8 11. b3 b5 {Carlsen,M (2853)-Nakamura,H (2787) chess.com INT 2016}) 8... d5 $1 {"Very good move." (Mamedyarov) "White just has to look for equality there." (Carlsen)} ({Another top game saw fascinating action after:} 8... Bd7 9. b3 cxd4 10. exd4 a6 11. a4 Rc8 12. Re1 d5 13. c5 Bg4 14. h3 Bxf3 15. Bxf3 e6 16. Rb1 Nxd4 17. Qxd4 Ne4 18. Rxe4 Bxd4 19. Rxd4 Qf6 {Nepomniachtchi,I (2721) -Wang,H (2735) Beijing 2013}) 9. cxd5 Nxd5 10. Nxd5 Qxd5 11. Ne5 Qd6 {The main point behind the timely d6-d5 is that White cannot include his dark-squared bishop into the action. Had the central pawn remained on its initial position White would have had a chance to trade on c6 followed by Bc1-f4! with a tempo. Now, the bishop simply suffers.} 12. Nc4 ({In a predecessor Black quickly got the initiative after:} 12. Nxc6 bxc6 13. dxc5 Qxc5 14. Qf3 Ba6 {Mader,L (1880) -Caliebe,N (1427) Erfurt 2017}) 12... Qc7 13. d5 (13. dxc5 Rd8 14. Qa4 Bf5 { is excellent for Black thanks to his strong bishops.}) 13... Rd8 {Here and on the next move Black could have played Nc6-e5 if he "wanted draw" (Mamedyarov)} (13... Ne5) 14. Bd2 Nb4 {"I am not burning bridges yet, I still have a very safe position." (Carlsen)} (14... Ne5) 15. Bxb4 cxb4 16. Rc1 a5 {The black bishop pair can be a huge asset whenever the game opens, but for the time being Carlsen needs to finish the queenside development.} 17. a3 bxa3 18. bxa3 a4 19. Qd3 Bf5 {"A massive, massive oversight" (Carlsen)} ({Instead the world champion suggested} 19... Bd7 20. d6 exd6 21. Ne5 {"I guess Black is marginally better, although it should be drawish" (Carlsen)}) ({Or} 19... Ra6 $5 {to which he did not like} 20. Rb1 $6 {with the same idea as in the game} ( 20. Qb1 {might be better} Bd7 21. Rfd1) 20... Bd7 ({However, it seems as Carlsen have missed the strong maneuver} 20... Rc6 $1 21. Rfc1 Rc5 {followed by b7-b5 and Black takes over the initiative.}) 21. d6) 20. e4 Bd7 21. Qe3 { Missed by the world champion. "Maybe I just overestimated my position." (Carlsen)} Ra6 22. e5 $1 {The central pawn mass comes into motion and the black pieces cannot co-ordinate themselves.} b5 23. d6 Qb8 24. dxe7 Re8 25. Rfd1 Rxe7 26. Qc5 Qf8 ({From afar Black missed} 26... Rae6 27. Bd5 {"with a win" (Carlsen), for example} Rxe5 28. Nxe5 Rxe5 29. Bxf7+ $1) ({"Maybe I should have played"} 26... Qd8 {(Carlsen) But then there is} 27. Qxb5 $1 { (Mamedyarov)}) ({Perhaps Carlsen had to go into passive defense with} 26... Bf8 ) 27. Ne3 $1 {Missed by White. "Then I am completely busted." (Carlsen) The threat Ne3-d5 forces Black to give up a pawn.} Be6 28. Qxb5 Raa7 29. Nd5 Bxd5 30. Rxd5 Reb7 31. Qd3 Rb8 32. h4 (32. f4 $5) 32... Qe8 33. Qd4 Qe7 34. f4 Bf8 35. Kh2 {It is not only the extra pawn which makes White's positon so good. Look at the powerful centralization that he has!} Rab7 36. Qxa4 {Safe approach, especially in respect to the tournament situation. A draw would be most likely enough for Mamedyarov for the overall win, therefore he takes away any risk.} ( {Objectively he would do better to keep the queens on the board. Strong was:} 36. Rd6 $1 {heading for an attack with the opposite-colored bishops. For example:} Rc7 ({Or} 36... Rb2 37. Kh3 $1 {when the f7 pawn will be soon reached-} Ra2 38. Bd5 Rxa3 39. Rf6) 37. Rxc7 Qxc7 38. Rc6 Qe7 ({If Black keeps the a4 pawn} 38... Qa5 $1 {then} 39. e6 fxe6 40. Qd7 Qf5 41. Rc7 {with decisive attack.}) 39. Bd5 Qxa3 40. Bxf7+ {The attack should decide.}) 36... Qxa3 37. Qxa3 Bxa3 38. Rcd1 {A nasty endgame for Black occurred. Without the rooks the opponents will immediately agree to a draw. With them, White will organize threats against the black king.} Be7 39. Kh3 Rc7 ({Normally Black will be happy to trade as many pawns on the kingside as possible, but} 39... h5 {exposes the h5 pawn after} 40. f5 gxf5 41. Rf1) 40. h5 $1 {The way that Mamedyarov mounts pressure during the game is impressive.} gxh5 {Trading the pawn, which could have come to h6 with mating threats.} ({After} 40... g5 41. Rd7 Rxd7 42. Rxd7 Kf8 {there is} 43. f5 $1) (40... Kf8 {was passive defense was the other way to try and hold.}) 41. f5 f6 42. e6 Rb3 (42... Kf8 $5) 43. Rd7 Rbc3 44. Ra1 Kg7 ({The trade is impossible-} 44... Rxd7 45. exd7 Rd3 46. Ra8+ Kg7 47. Bc6 Rd6 48. Ba4 Rd4 49. Re8 Kf7 50. Bb3+) 45. Ra8 Kh6 46. Re8 Bb4 {It is not clear how can White improve further. If the bishop can find a good spot, he would be winning, but it is not easy.} 47. Rb8 ({If} 47. Rh8 Be7 48. Be4 h4 $1 {with the idea} 49. Kxh4 Rxd7 50. exd7 Rc4 {with a draw.}) 47... Be7 48. Be4 R3c4 49. Bd5 R4c5 50. Be4 Rc4 51. Bd5 R4c5 52. Rb7 Rxd7 {Now he can.} 53. Rxd7 Ra5 54. Bc6 ({The rook endgame after} 54. Rxe7 Rxd5 55. Rf7 Rxf5 56. e7 Re5 57. Rxf6+ {is a draw.}) 54... Ba3 55. Rf7 {So far Carlsen had defended perfectly and came very close to he draw.} Re5 ({Black should have gone for} 55... Rxf5 56. e7 Bxe7 57. Rxe7 Rc5 58. Bf3 f5 {and during the post mortem the players were not sure about the evaluation, but Carlsen believed it should be draw.}) 56. Kh4 $1 {Depriving the black king of the g5 square. "I realized, that was it" (Carlsen)} (56. Rxf6+ {was the only move the world champion was calculating and it should be defendable after} Kg5 57. Rf7 Bd6) 56... Bc1 $2 { Only this is the crucial mistake. Apparently, Carlsen dismissed the position a tad too early.} ({The line} 56... Re2 57. Rxf6+ Kg7 58. Rf7+ Kh6 59. g4 Rh2+ 60. Kg3 {should win for White.}) ({However,after} 56... Bc5 $1 57. Rxf6+ Kg7 58. Rf7+ Kh6 59. Bf3 ({It is important that White cannot bring his pawns into motion:} 59. Bd7 Bd6 60. f6 Kg6) 59... Be3 {followed by Be3-g5+ Black seems to build sort of a fortress. For example} 60. g4 ({Or} 60. Bd1 Bg5+ 61. Kh3 Re3 62. Kg2 h4) 60... Bg5+ 61. Kg3 h4+ 62. Kg2 Re3 {The draw seems the correct result here.}) (56... Bb4 $1 {is similar to 56...Bc5.}) 57. e7 1-0 [Event "Biel SUI"] [Site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2018.08.01"] [Round "10.2"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Georgiadis, Nico"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B20"] [WhiteElo "2842"] [BlackElo "2526"] [Annotator "Bojkov, Dejan"] [PlyCount "97"] [EventDate "2018.07.22"] 1. e4 c5 2. Na3 {Obviously trying to get his opponent as quickly as possible out of book. Carlsen had never tried this before, at least according to Megabase.} ({True, in a blitz game he had put something on a3:} 2. a3 Nc6 3. b4 cxb4 4. axb4 Nxb4 5. d4 d5 6. c3 Nc6 7. exd5 Qxd5 8. Na3 Bf5 9. Nb5 {in Carlsen,M (2837)-Inarkiev,E (2689) Riadh 2017}) 2... g6 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. c3 d5 5. exd5 Qxd5 6. Bc4 Qe4+ 7. Kf1 Be6 {Georgiadis turned out to be well prepared here as well and quickly equalized.} 8. Qa4+ {A novelty.} ({A predecessor saw: } 8. Bb5+ Bd7 9. d4 Nf6 10. Bd3 Qd5 11. Bc4 Qh5 12. Nb5 Na6 13. Be3 cxd4 14. Nfxd4 {but Black was doing well here too, Meister,J (2517) -Friedrich,W (2253) Berlin 2013}) 8... Nd7 9. d4 Ngf6 10. Bg5 ({After} 10. dxc5 O-O 11. Be3 { Black has a choice between} Rad8 {fighting for the initiative.} ({Or} 11... Rac8 {in order to return the pawn. For example} 12. Re1 Bxc4+ 13. Nxc4 Qd3+ 14. Kg1 Ne4 {and Black seems perfectly fine.})) 10... Bxc4+ 11. Qxc4 Qd5 {Playing it safe.} ({Instead the natural} 11... O-O {was leading to a more complex game. White can win a pawn with:} 12. Re1 Qf5 13. Rxe7 $6 {but that allows Black too much and} Nd5 14. Re1 cxd4 15. cxd4 Rfe8 {gives him plenty for a pawn.}) 12. Re1 e6 {An accurate move.} ({White would get a tiny little bit of an advantage after} 12... Qxc4+ 13. Nxc4 cxd4 14. Nxd4 Nd5 15. Ne3) 13. Bxf6 Nxf6 14. Qb5+ ( {Perhaps} 14. dxc5 {was a better try, for example} Rc8 15. Re5 Qd7 16. g3 O-O 17. Kg2 {although the white knight on a3 is still somewhat awkwardly placed.}) 14... Nd7 ({Not} 14... Qd7 $2 15. Qxc5) 15. Ne5 a6 {Once again very solid play. } ({Although Georgiadis could have snatched the knight at once:} 15... Bxe5 $1 {If now} 16. Rxe5 ({And risked to grab a pawn with} 16. dxe5 Qxa2 17. Rd1 O-O-O {as} 18. Nc4 {is strongly met with} Nxe5 $1 19. Qxc5+ (19. Rxd8+ Rxd8 20. Nxe5 $4 Qb1+ 21. Ke2 Qe4+ 22. Kf1 Rd1#) 19... Nc6 20. Nd6+ Kb8 {where Black should stop the initiative with accurate play. White's problem is that he cannot use his kingside rook.}) 16... a6 $1 17. Rxd5 axb5 18. Rg5 b4 $1 {where the black pieces are better prepared for the opening of the game.}) 16. Qc4 ({The world champion avoids} 16. Qxd7+ Qxd7 17. Nxd7 Kxd7 18. Nc4 Kc6 {with equality.}) 16... Nxe5 ({The other capture was also OK-} 16... Bxe5 17. dxe5 Qxc4+ 18. Nxc4 {since after} b5 {White cannot hold his knight on the central outpost} 19. Nd6+ Ke7 {because of the threat Nd7xe5!}) 17. dxe5 Rd8 18. Qxd5 Rxd5 19. f4 { An endgame emerged where the bishop on g7 does not seem great. Georgiadis however makes sure this is not the case.} g5 $1 ({Also good was} 19... Ke7 20. Nc4 b5 21. Nd6 g5 $1) 20. fxg5 Ke7 {The black pieces are much better prepared for the battle. Georgiadis plays for a win.} ({Weaker was} 20... Rxe5 21. Rxe5 Bxe5 22. Nc4 Bf4 23. h4 Ke7 24. Ke2 {with equality.}) 21. h4 Rxe5 ({It also made sense to postpone the capture for a move:} 21... b5 $5 22. Rh3 Rxe5 23. Rxe5 Bxe5 {with slight advantage for Black.}) 22. Rxe5 Bxe5 23. Ke2 b5 24. Nc2 Rd8 (24... f6 $5) 25. Ne1 c4 $1 {Black has posted all his pawns correctly on the light squares. Thus, they are not obstructing his bishop and they help it restrict the white knight. The b5-b4 break is always in the air.} 26. Nf3 Bg7 27. Nd2 h6 {Once again playing for a win.} ({If he wanted a draw, Black could have chosen say} 27... Rd3 28. a4 Rg3 29. Kf2 Rd3) 28. Ne4 {The world champion is also trying his best.} ({Instead} 28. a4 hxg5 29. hxg5 Rd5 30. axb5 axb5 31. Ne4 b4 {would have seen everything disappearing with a draw.}) 28... hxg5 29. hxg5 Rd5 30. a3 a5 31. Re1 Be5 $1 {Open the road for the black king. It is heading to g6. Once it gets there, the g5 pawn will suffer.} ({It does not make much sense to open the queenside with} 31... b4 {After} 32. axb4 axb4 { Black will be happy to see} 33. cxb4 $2 ({However} 33. Ra1 {would cause problems along the open file. Ironically, the pawn which is in danger is the one on c4. For example} bxc3 34. bxc3 Re5 35. Ra7+ Kf8 36. Kf3 Rf5+ 37. Kg4 Be5 38. g3 Kg7 39. Ra4 Rf1 40. Rxc4) 33... Bxb2) 32. g3 Kf8 33. Kf3 Kg7 34. Kg4 Kg6 {Black threatens Be5-c7-d8 to win the pawn, therefore the next move is forced.} 35. Rf1 {But now the rook is busy and Black can revert back to the b5-b4 breakthrough idea.} Rd3 ({Perhaps the immediate} 35... b4 36. axb4 axb4 37. Rf3 Rd1 {was better, with chances for a win.}) ({Here} 35... Bc7 {is met with} 36. Rf6+ Kg7 37. g6 $1) 36. Rf3 Rd1 37. Rf2 Rd5 ({The other option was the rook endgame after} 37... Re1 38. Nf6 Re3 39. Nh5 Re4+ 40. Nf4+ Bxf4 41. gxf4 e5 42. Rf1 {Then Black can win a pawn with} a4 (42... exf4 43. Rxf4 Re2 44. Rf6+ Kg7 45. a4 $1) 43. Rf2 exf4 44. Rd2 f3+ 45. Kxf3 Re5 {but I am not sure how good his winning chances are.}) 38. Nd2 {Carlsen changes the position of his knight and finally gets some relief for his g5 pawn.} Bc7 39. Nf3 Bd8 40. Nh4+ Kg7 { would have split the point.} 41. Nf3 Bb6 {Once again trying to beat the champion!} 42. Re2 Bc7 43. Re4 Bd6 ({Safer was to allow the trade allong the fifth rank with} 43... Bb6 {Then} 44. Re5 Rxe5 45. Nxe5 Be3 {preserves winning chances for Black. For example:} 46. a4 ({Or} 46. Nc6 a4 47. Kf3 Bxg5 48. Nd4 Bc1 49. Nxb5 Bxb2 50. Ke3) 46... bxa4 47. Nxc4 Bc1 48. Nb6 Bxb2 49. Nxa4 Bc1) 44. Rd4 $1 {Finally, White manages to get rid of the active black rook. He is more or less safe now.} Rxd4+ 45. Nxd4 b4 46. a4 (46. axb4 {would be a draw after} axb4 47. cxb4 Bxb4 48. Nf3 Ba5 49. Ne5 c3 50. bxc3 Bxc3) 46... b3 $4 { An tragic finish of an excellent game.} ({Georgiadis could have made a draw with either} 46... bxc3 47. bxc3 Bc7) ({Or} 46... Bc7 47. Nf3 Bd6 48. Nd2 bxc3 49. bxc3 Be5 50. Nxc4 Bxc3) 47. Nf3 {Now he loses both his pawns on the light squares.} Ba3 {would promote his b-pawn. But this is not the case-} ({If} 47... Kg6 48. Nd2 Bc7 49. Nxc4 Bd8 50. Ne5+ {is most accurate} ({Or} 50. Nd2 Bxg5 51. Nxb3) 50... Kg7 51. Kh5 {and White should win.}) 48. bxa3 b2 49. Nd2 1-0